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Thread: Iontophoresis Botox Treatments for Hyperhidrosis

  1. #11
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    I think that is wise Geoff, definately.

    I would never try to suggest that botox is the cure all. Personally I found it to be effective at certain types of flushing, but not all.

    The type that comes on quickly and feels like a rush of warmth across the entire flush zone, this was treated very well. So reactions to mild exercise, hot (thermally) food, blushing etc were all good. Infact, I first noticed the results while tucking into a McMuffin (the steam and warmth always causes me to flushly transiently).

    The type that comes on slower, feels unpleasantly 'prickly', and can last for long periods of time wasnt effected at all. If I sat in the bath to long, drank alcohol, concerntrated on the computer to hard etc were not effected in the slightest.

    Im not an expert on rosacea / flushing triggers, but Id wager that the first example all has atleast something to do with acetylcholine. The former clearly has nothing. That said, I would be VERY happy to wave good bye to either!

    $500 - 700, wow... :?

    Would that be likely to come down if the treatment becomes more popular? Over a grand each year is something few rosaceans would shell out for imo.

    But we're getting a little ahead of ourselves there. Lets prove that the treatment actually does what it says on the tin before we start fretting over the cost


    Geoff, I shall look forward to hearing what kind of response you get to this.

    BB

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Bear
    I think that is wise Geoff, definately.

    I would never try to suggest that botox is the cure all. Personally I found it to be effective at certain types of flushing, but not all.

    The type that comes on quickly and feels like a rush of warmth across the entire flush zone, this was treated very well. So reactions to mild exercise, hot (thermally) food, blushing etc were all good. Infact, I first noticed the results while tucking into a McMuffin (the steam and warmth always causes me to flushly transiently).

    The type that comes on slower, feels unpleasantly 'prickly', and can last for long periods of time wasnt effected at all. If I sat in the bath to long, drank alcohol, concerntrated on the computer to hard etc were not effected in the slightest.

    Im not an expert on rosacea / flushing triggers, but Id wager that the first example all has atleast something to do with acetylcholine. The former clearly has nothing. That said, I would be VERY happy to wave good bye to either!

    $500 - 700, wow... :?

    Would that be likely to come down if the treatment becomes more popular? Over a grand each year is something few rosaceans would shell out for imo.

    But we're getting a little ahead of ourselves there. Lets prove that the treatment actually does what it says on the tin before we start fretting over the cost


    Geoff, I shall look forward to hearing what kind of response you get to this.

    BB


    Did you get improvement to what we call "spontaneous flushes for unknown reasons"?

    If they pass the new BOTOX that has much longer actions (irreversibly binds to the receptor) then the cost would plummet. But that still has a lot of testing for safety sake.

  3. #13
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    Not sure if I get those to be honest Geoffrey. I mean, I do flush sometimes and dont know why, but when I think about it there is usually a trigger involved. For example, I often get delayed reactions to certain triggers, and I used to think that this was spontaneous. But I now I know otherwise.

    Eitherway, I would say that it effected about half of my flushing triggers and half we left normal. Anything that gives you the 'hot under the collar' type feeling was completely sorted (within the test areas).

    So I can imagine that being REALLY helpful to many rosacea suffers who's main problem is flushing and blushing.

  4. #14
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    Bob,

    There is a large scale study being performed in Australia on Botox and facial flushing. They wont reveal anything to me until it is in print. Just know that they are indicating a 60% to 65% response rate. That is all I could get out of them.

    They already performed a pilot study on 15 rosacea sufferers and found it successful enough t now perform a large scale study.

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    Good news, certainly. Shame the tight lipped ozzie's would spill the beans any further.

    Do you know if they are using the injections or the transdermal method (former I expect)?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Bear
    Good news, certainly. Shame the tight lipped ozzie's would spill the beans any further.

    Do you know if they are using the injections or the transdermal method (former I expect)?


    Full face transdermal delivery big guy!

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    Does anyone know if the transdermal delivery of Botox
    would also have any effect on wrinkles?

    Dr Nase?

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    Quote Originally Posted by bethanne
    Does anyone know if the transdermal delivery of Botox
    would also have any effect on wrinkles?

    Dr Nase?

    Great question Bethanne,

    It has a much better effect because needle injections go to far or not far enough and they are injected in a bolus -- which means that you are suppose to lay down for at least 90 minutes to let the drug diffuse laterally along the nerve line (bunt no one does this).

    With iontophoresis you can deliver to the exact level needed in tiny concentrations that dont need to diffuse. This is the fuure of treatment with all Botox application including Frey's syndrome and cluster headaches.

  9. #19
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    Thats great Geoffrey. When can we expect to hear the results of this study?

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Bear
    Thats great Geoffrey. When can we expect to hear the results of this study?

    I have already told everyone else. I really dont feel like repeating myself, so you missed it big guy. No, seriously, I dont know. They emailed me with a confidentiality clause at the end that was half a page long. They are going after the patent for the device, loaded gel, and pulse injection.

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