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Thread: Clarithromycin is a very safe medication for rosacea

  1. #1
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    Default Clarithromycin is a very safe medication for rosacea

    Group,

    After a physician erroneously stated that clarithromycin is dangerous to the heart, many rosacea sufferers have stopped taking this excellent rosacea medication. Many have emailed me to question whether the information passed on was correct. It is not true. Cardiologists routinely use our popular clarithromycin in patients predisposed to heart attacks, angina and even strokes. Please dont worry yourself.

    Antibiotics such as Clarithromycin and Azithromycin are used as first line medications to help prevent heart attacks associated with inflammation or infection.

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    (1) NEW YORK, Mar 11 (Reuters Health) - Treatment with antibiotics may reduce the risk of heart attack and chest pain in some patients with heart disease, according to the results of a new study.

    In a study of 148 patients who experienced a heart attack or an episode of severe, heart-related chest pain, those who took a 3-month course of the antibiotic clarithromycin were 41% less likely to have another cardiovascular "event" during the next year and a half than patients who received an inactive (placebo) pill.

    "Antibiotics seem to be a beneficial option" for patients with coronary heart disease, the study's lead author, Dr. Juha Sinisalo of Helsinki University Central Hospital in Finland, told Reuters Health.

    Inflammation plays a role in both heart attacks and unstable angina, a type of heart-related chest pain that occurs when a person is at rest. Recently, more and more attention has been paid to the idea that infections may contribute to this inflammation.

    Based on the potential link between infections and the inflammation involved in heart disease, investigators have tried to find out whether clearing infections with antibiotics can benefit heart disease patients. So far, the results of these studies have not been conclusive.

    Unlike other studies that tested the effectiveness of short-term antibiotic treatment, Sinisalo's team evaluated the effects of a 3-month course of the antibiotic clarithromycin. The study included patients who had had a severe heart attack or unstable angina. The findings will be published in the April 2nd issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

    Patients treated with the antibiotic were 41% less likely to have another heart attack, unstable angina or other type of cardiovascular event. The apparent beneficial effect of clarithromycin began while patients were taking the drug, but this effect did not diminish after the patients stopped taking it.

    The researchers suspect that most of the benefits were due to clarithromycin's antibacterial effect. They note that a bacterium called Chlamydia pneumoniae, which is targeted by clarithromycin, can produce inflammation in blood vessels. But the authors point out that clarithromycin may have affected other infections, too. In addition, the antibiotic has a direct anti-inflammatory effect, which could have accounted for some of the benefits, they note.

    SOURCE: Circulation 2002;105.

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    (2) DALLAS, March 12 – An antibiotic prolonged life and reduced risk of future heart attacks in people hospitalized for heart attack or unstable angina, according to a report in today’s rapid access issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association.

    The antibiotic clarithromycin significantly lowered risk of death or serious cardiovascular events compared to those given a placebo. Clarithromycin is typically prescribed for respiratory infections.

    “Patients with acute heart attacks or severe angina seem to benefit from treatment with a macrolide antibiotic,” says lead author Juha Sinisalo, M.D., of Helsinki University Central Hospital in Helsinki, Finland. “The most likely mechanism of action is clarithromycin’s antibacterial effect.”
    Infections are one cause of inflammation, and inflammation plays an important role in the development of coronary heart disease. Increasing evidence from animal and human studies indicates that several infections such as Chlamydia pneumoniae are associated with coronary heart disease.

    Although the apparent advantage of clarithromycin likely stems from its antibacterial power, the drug may do double duty in coronary heart disease patients. Clarithromycin also has an anti-inflammatory action that is independent of its effect on bacteria, he says.

    “There are only two ways to prove the connection between infections and coronary artery disease: vaccinations and antibiotic therapy,” says Sinisalo. “Vaccinations to prevent heart disease are not available. Therefore, we conducted this study to find out if suppressing infections would decrease the rate of new heart attacks.”

    Researchers have published results from only a few studies that have tested antibiotics for patients with a high risk of heart attack. Trials in patients with stable heart disease have yielded differing results. In a previous randomized study, a macrolide antibiotic was used for one month to treat people with acute coronary problems. The antibiotic seemed to show some benefit when compared to a placebo, but that advantage disappeared within six months.

    Sinisalo and his colleagues studied 148 patients, ages 18 to 80, who were admitted to nine hospitals in different parts of Finland between September 1998 and December 2000. These patients had either a serious heart attack or severe chest pain.

    The team randomized 74 patients to receive the antibiotic and 74 to get a placebo. Each participant received one 500 milligram tablet of clarithromycin or an identical-looking placebo daily for 85 days. Neither the patients nor the researchers knew who was receiving the drug or the placebo.

    Age, gender and cardiovascular risk factors were similar for both groups. There was also no significant difference between the two groups in the use of antibiotics during the study other than the one used in the trial.
    During the three-month treatment, 11 of the antibiotic patients and 19 of the placebo patients died or suffered a nonfatal heart attack or unstable angina. Although these findings show a benefit to patients receiving clarithromycin, the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant.

    Sinisalo says one reason for that result is that the number of patients in the trial was too small to show a significant benefit at only three months. The patients were followed for an average of 555 days after hospitalization, with follow-up times ranging from 138 to 924 days.
    At the end of the study, 16 of the clarithromycin patients and 27 of the placebo patients had died, or suffered a nonfatal heart attack, unstable angina or a stroke. That difference was statistically significant. “The action of clarithromycin seems to be long-lasting,” says Sinisalo.

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    (3) Role of inflammation in heart attacks

    In recent years, the role of inflammation in heart attacks and heart disease has been extensively studied. Atherosclerosis, the disease of the coronary arteries that commonly causes heart attacks, used to be defined solely as the build–up of fatty plaque inside the arteries. Today, however, studies have shown that atherosclerosis is at least partly an inflammatory disease. This theory holds that the arterial walls become inflamed, which further contributes to the build–up of plaque. In fact, inflammation is being linked to a wide variety of diseases, often as a contributing factor to their severity.

    This evolving understanding of the role of inflammation opens up new diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities for preventing and treating heart attack. Physicians can measure the degree of inflammation in the body by tracking inflammatory markers in the bloodstream. Two such markers are C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL–6).

    Studies show higher levels of both CRP and IL–6 with increasing age, body mass index, blood pressure and exposure to tobacco smoke. CRP may actually damage blood vessel walls and increase plaque formation. High levels of IL–6 are associated with excess alcohol intake, diabetes and lack of exercise. High levels of interleukin–18, an immune system protein, have been shown to signal inflammation and risk for heart attack and stroke. Blood clots may also occur in response to inflammation caused by the rupture of unstable, fatty plaque. Blood clots can block arteries and increase the risk for heart attack.

    New studies have found that high levels of CRP in women with high blood pressure may increase their risk of heart attack. Data from the Women’s Health Study, an ongoing trial of nearly 30,000 women in the United States, has shown that when a woman has both high blood pressure and high levels of CRP, her risk of having a heart attack increases by as much as eight times. The combined risk factors also increase the risk for stroke.

    Current recommendations from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) support limited use of a new test to check for CRP. The highly sensitive C–reactive protein (hs–CRP) test is not recommended for general screening, but may be helpful in certain situations. In people with a history of coronary disease, for example, the test may be useful in assessing the likelihood of recurrent heart attacks.

    Research has also found a relationship between another group of inflammatory markers and heart attacks in non–smoking, non–diabetic men with normal blood pressure and normal lipid levels. An 18–year study in Sweden found that the risk for heart attack in the group increased as the level of inflammatory markers increased. The inflammatory makers identified in the study were alpha1–antitrypsin, haptoglobin, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen and orosomucoid.

    Treating people at risk for heart attack with anti–inflammatory medications has also been studied. Research has found that clarithromycin, an antibiotic medication often prescribed for respiratory infections, may reduce the risk of heart attack or other cardiovascular event. This finding, however, is limited to patients with a particular heart rhythm disorder, while other studies have found no benefit to short–term clarithromycin therapy in patients with acute coronary syndrome who were at high risk for heart attack.

    Researchers looking into the relationship between infection and heart disease have also explored the benefit of influenza (flu) vaccinations for people who have had heart attacks. Results have been mixed. One study with first–time heart attack patients found that the flu vaccine did not alter the incidence of a subsequent heart attack. A different study with patients hospitalized for either heart attack or angioplasty and placement of stents found that a flu vaccine reduced the risk of mortality for up to one year.

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    still the FDA issued an alert. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10402945/
    I know the FDA is afraid of holding back information after Vioxx and may start alerting the public everything no matter what basis theyve gotten.
    The age range of heart patients in the study was 18 to 85 which may not be so good, however, a study performed on more than 4000 patients does warrant further studies.
    The claims made earlier this year on another board were based on no evidence. I think clarithromycin got confused with erythromycin, something that may happen to anybody
    http://rosacea.ii.net/news/2005/12/t...n-same-as.html

    BTW, also some other anti-inflammatories like itraconazole are suspected to affect the heart in rare cases , it wont hold me back of taking 4 weeks of 200 mg daily only 3 months after clarithromycin. I dont think that anything will happen, but Im not so confident that taking all those drug is just good for the body. They are good for something and bad for other things. We only know of some of the actions but not all. Next year some Danish researchers might be ready to publish some very interesting findings regarding back pains. Perhaps socalled modic changes giving back pains can be cured by taking a 3 month course of antibiotics...if this is true it will be a major breakthrough

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    Quote Originally Posted by fanta
    still the FDA issued an alert. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/10402945/
    I know the FDA is afraid of holding back information after Vioxx and may start alerting the public everything no matter what basis theyve gotten.
    The age range of heart patients in the study was 18 to 85 which may not be so good, however, a study performed on more than 4000 patients does warrant further studies.
    The claims made earlier this year on another board were based on no evidence. I think clarithromycin got confused with erythromycin, something that may happen to anybody
    http://rosacea.ii.net/news/2005/12/t...n-same-as.html

    BTW, also some other anti-inflammatories like itraconazole are suspected to affect the heart in rare cases , it wont hold me back of taking 4 weeks of 200 mg daily only 3 months after clarithromycin. I dont think that anything will happen, but Im not so confident that taking all those drug is just good for the body. They are good for something and bad for other things. We only know of some of the actions but not all. Next year some Danish researchers might be ready to publish some very interesting findings regarding back pains. Perhaps socalled modic changes giving back pains can be cured by taking a 3 month course of antibiotics...if this is true it will be a major breakthrough

    Boy the FDA does not make it easy. The study clearly shows no difference between sugar pill (placebo) and biaxin -- so, I am not quite sure why they include the study or even discuss it?

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    why did the British Medical Journal then publish the study? I reckoned that the researchers expected no effect or a positive effect, but somehow got surprised

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    here is an article from the Danish Medicines Agency. It seems a bit too early to say anything conclusive. One thing is sure though, you dont drop dead if you are having a healthy heart. The question is whether clarithromycin is risky for a subgroup of heart patients, nothing else. Erythromycin should probably be more a concern of ours

    http://www.dkma.dk/visUKLSArtikel.asp?artikelID=7597

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    Yes. That's great fanta.

    It would be more helpful if you posted a study correlating heart disease and cow fat.

    I simply do not understand why you persist with these straw-grasping assertions about standard supplements and medications. It's not helpful. That's it, man. You just confuse people that are actually trying to learn and deal with this disease.

    I applaud your perpetual disinformational postings and petty sniping.

    You are a true asset to the online rosacea community.

    /hangs gold medal 'round fanta's neck
    35 year-old male
    Erythmatotelangiectatic rosacea & Ocular
    20 + laser treatments.
    Toleraine Soothing Light Facial Fluid for moisturizer. I don't use a special cleanser. Clonidine daily; klonopin sometimes.
    BEST and CURRENT TREATMENT I use: Low-Level Red Light Therapy LED array.
    Please feel free to PM me with your low-level red light therapy (LLRLT) questions. I'm happy to help if I can.

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    what misinformation? the FDA has issued an alert for clarithromycin, thats a fact. Furthermore Vioxx was once standard, was that any guarantee for anything? Antibiotics have increased world's health in fighting infection and inflammation, no doubt about that. However, its not necessarily healthy to take aziethromycin 500mg, clarithromycin 500 mg, tetracyclin 2000mg, doxycyclin 200 mg for long periods of time..thats not standard by any means. Some may just be forced to do this, particularly if they are harsh to their skin ..using harsh acne treatments, something we see time after time on these rosacea boards. I think its necessary to have a holistic view on things and I dont think we can be 100% sure about anything.
    At the end of the day, the human body doesnt like to be stressed to much by anything. Life long dependency of drugs should be avoided, thats why I prefer isotretinoin cause it works for some time after you discontinue it. With clarithromycin its like 1 week and you are back where you started.
    I take 200 mg doxycyklin now, my derm wants me to settle with 3 days, I think it will be 14 days..but I have to dose down after some weeks or Ill hurt my body and eventually trigger other chronic diseases...I need to find a way out of this madness, so I hope low dose isotretinoin will work better next time.

    BTW, one of your drugs may hurt your little fella

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    Edited out by the fanta

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    Senior Member IowaDavid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by fanta
    I take 200 mg doxycyklin now, my derm wants me to settle with 3 days, I think it will be 14 days..but I have to dose down after some weeks or Ill hurt my body and eventually trigger other chronic diseases...I need to find a way out of this madness, so I hope low dose isotretinoin will work better next time.
    I would like to see some sort of documentation that explains this "triggering" of "other chronic disease" from antibiotics.

    My problem with your posts is that you tend toward sensationalist assertions and expansive claims that have no real backing through studies.

    What I mean: Fine, if Vioxx gives its useers a 2 or 3% higher risk of heart disease, that is that company's responsibility to disclose that.
    So, studies for Biaxin, or Ester-C?

    Your posts, on the otherhand, have a tone that strikes me as analgous to tabloid journalism. I'd daresay you have some odd semi-pathological fear of supplements and pills. Because you really don't make sense much of the time. And your posts are supported, for the most part, on quicksand bases.

    Go about your business, man. I'd like nothing more for you than to find a solid, reliable treatment program so you would leave these forums, or help us all along to recovery.

    Otherwise, I would please ask you to stop throwing out your BS and confusing people that are new to these forums that really would benefit from treatment modalities that have been studied for rosacea.
    35 year-old male
    Erythmatotelangiectatic rosacea & Ocular
    20 + laser treatments.
    Toleraine Soothing Light Facial Fluid for moisturizer. I don't use a special cleanser. Clonidine daily; klonopin sometimes.
    BEST and CURRENT TREATMENT I use: Low-Level Red Light Therapy LED array.
    Please feel free to PM me with your low-level red light therapy (LLRLT) questions. I'm happy to help if I can.

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    sure you can trigger chronic diseases from antibiotics, in particular in your stomach and bowel, everybody knows that. Try read whats written on the boxes of drugs you take, you are obviosuly too young to understand that side effects indeed are real.
    Ester C can be taken with tetracyclines, but its written on the box not to take it with calcium or medicine and supplements containing calcium. Ester C is a supplement containing calcium so why the hell should I take it together with it when its contraindicated???? whats that big deal? Taking too much tetracycline per day is a problem cause it might accumulate in your bones. Also, it may be a problem to renal function if you take too much of it. Colitis and Steven Johnson Syndrom is something real people get from overusing antibiotics. Also there may be a problem with building bacterial resistance. If you have helicobacter pylori bacteria in your stomach you will have a harder time getting rid of it now after overusing clarithromycin big time. There are many different possibilities but clarithromycin is the safest, cheapest and best drug for that purpose. Many believe that stomach ulcers are just a minor problem, its not. You need to be monitored for the rest of life after elimination of helicobacter, sorry!
    I think its correct to take drugs when there is necessity, but dont support overuse of drugs. I honestly dont understand why you keep on using LED lamps when they are bad for rosacea...that fooling around, resulting in overuse of clarithromycin to keep down the produced inflammation.

    You have won the first prize in idiotic rosacea treatment and ignorance ](*,)

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