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Thread: Embarassing make-up question (for me at least)

  1. #1
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    Default Embarassing make-up question (for me at least)

    I'm a 24yr old male, very pale (other than the redness, of course), and I'm considering using make-up to cover my ever reddening cheeks. It's embarassing for me, I don't know who to ask really, so, thought I'd post here. What looks the least like cover up but covers the red? I don't have any papules really, just the red. I'm currently saving for a few trips to Scottsdale to see Dr. Soldo, but, until then, I'd like to be able to go out in public. Any help would be appreciated.

    Justin

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    Hmmm, its a difficult one, and i think you can choose to do it one of two ways. You can either go the whole hog and try and disguise completely using a camouflage make-up, such as Dermablend. Or you can minimise the redness using a more general type of make up.

    If your thinking of the Dermablend i would recommend doing a search locally to find someone who specialises in showing people with skin irregularities, such as birthmarks and often rosacea as well, how to apply it expertly to the face. there is nothing to be embarrassed about as these people are used to dealing with all sorts of people with all sorts of problem and because this kind of make-up is oil based it can be tricky to get right.

    On the general make-up front it can be a bit of a minefield as theres so much choice. i was recently recommended a new base by Estee Lauder that primes the skin by minimising rednes/sallowness etc depending on which product you use; http://www.esteelauder.co.uk/trendte...erio_0405.tmpl <----- more info. I haven't tried the primer myself but someone who has used it said its excellent, so might be worth trying. Otherwise theres a green based cream that is supposed to neutralise the red, but if you use too much it can make you look dead

    IMO i think y'd be better off getting the primer by Estee lauder or similar to knock the red back and then get a very light foundation to apply on top. Most foundations are very good nowadays, i think Ivory is normally the lightest and follow the less is more principle.

  3. #3
    Member NoMoreRed!'s Avatar
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    Great post, Sally.

    I was also a lost guy who wanted (wait... I really didn't want to...) to try out makeup. What I did:

    Ordered a lot of samples here: http://store.yahoo.com/skin-etc/jairbasa.html

    So, the shopping list: Samples X*3$
    Sponge 1*4$
    And you maay want this, if you afford it: Handi Brush 1*31$

    Now that you know your color/skin type/whatever, you can order more, here: http://store.yahoo.com/skin-etc/janirambasco.html

    I use this, and it works great. It actually have removed some of mye triggers. I don't blush as easy as before, maybe because I'm more confident with this stuff on. All in all, great stuff.

    Whatever you choose, good luck.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Mermaid's Avatar
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    Hi Justin,

    I see no difference in females and males using makeup. We are not talking about the obvious drag queen look but simply a small way to minimise some of the redness.

    The last thing you should do is to use anything that will actually give you a mask like affect. It will only draw attention to your complexion. The key is to find a colour that closest matches the exact shade of your normal colouring, then you are three quarters of the way there. Through my modelling I actually find it the norm to see men wearing makeup and it looks natural and fabulous.

    Remember you don't want to hide behind it, just to give you a bit of a boost that no one notices. Less is more so start sparingly and go from there. If you would like to try the Dermablend that Sally Ann suggested, just bear in mind that they do include Petroleum or Mineral Oil which some may find irritating. Not saying it won't be good for you but just so you know.

    As for recommmendations, there are so many and you'll have to experiment to see whether you are more comfortable with a liquid, a powder or a cream or whether you will have a reaction to them.

    Many men like to use the tinted sunscreen option. This is often a good way of toning the redness down with Linda Sy's Tinted Zinco being a popular choice. This can be mixed with the untinted Zinco to get the right shade for you.

    I use Cory Cosmetics and when you find the right shade, it really gives a very natural, beautiful look. It is a mineral foundation and great for rosacea. Once you get the hang of using a brush and buffing, then it's a great option and extremely natural. These are available at www.corycosmetics.com

    If you wanted a more sheer look, find a liquid foundation that matches your skin tone and doesn't irritate and mix a few drops into your daily moisturiser. It will give sheer coverage, natural and it may be all you need. I like Sally Ann's suggestion to first use the Estee Lauder primer. I've also heard that Cover Girl Tru blend make a great foundation.

    A fellow male rosacean has had great success with the following. I honestly cannot tell he is wearing anything when I see him, it looks so natural.

    Firstly he applies a sunscreen. Use whatever works for you and then to mattify and get rid of the shine he uses 'Avene Complexion Corrector, Compact Foundation Cream SPF 15'. He uses a colour that exactly matches his normal tone. It gives exceptional coverage without a hint of a mask like appearance. He just looks great.

    Although I have not used it, many people are finding the new Lycogel foundation to be a fabulous option for rosaceans. You can find more info at http://www.lycogel.com/index.html

    Many who have reported being intolerant to foundations have had great success with the Lycogel. Worth a try as you can buy samples of both the Lycogel and the Cory Cosmetics before you buy.

    Anyway if you need more help with application or anything else, just holler.

    Hope this helps.

    Mermaid

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    Mermaid i didn't know you are/were a model! How on earth do you cope with the bright lights and scrutinisation by everyone? it would be my worst nightmare.

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    Thanks everyone! Excellent posts, I definitely have a place to start from now, I'll be trying some out this weekend, in the confines of my apartment of course. No wigs though :p

    Justin

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    Can i suggest you make sure the mirror is on a windowsill where you get good natural light. That way it will tun out much more natural than if you try and put it on in artificial light - even better go out in the garden afterwards with a small mirror and scrutinise yr work. That way yr looking at it in the worst possible light for flaws showing and if it looks good then youve got it cracked! .

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    Senior Member Jordan's Avatar
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    I use tinted ZincO cream. Read about the benefits of applying micronized zinc oxide and dimethicone in Beating Rosacea to your face. It reduces redness by calming the face, keeps heat from building up on the face, and is just slightly tinted so it doesn't leave that white residue on your face, but reduces the redness just a bit more so you look better (not clear) and you don't look like you have an inch of makeup on.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Mermaid's Avatar
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    Hey Sally Ann,

    When I first developed rosacea 3 years ago, it was as if my whole world had just come to a screeching halt. For the first 2 years I became a total recluse. I looked like a mess and I was struggling to understand what had happened to me and what I should do about it.

    After my failed ETS surgery in May 2004, I made a pact with myself that I would do everything in my power to get my life back. I had always been fiercely independant and ambitious, so to have rosacea destroy me both physically and psychologically was unbearable.

    I have had a wide and varied work history. I have modelled for several years now and it was always a fun, frivolous and easy way to make some money on the side. I've never taken it seriously but have earnt some good pocket money as a result. Especially now, I inwardly resent how superficial the industry is and perhaps for that reason, I am even more disinterested in the whole business however, as I am not ready to go back to a 'proper' job, it is convenient.

    After 12 months of completely dedicating myself to gaining remission, I believe that I am almost there, fingers crossed. I have the extreme luxury of not having to work at the moment and I now do some modelling to pay for my IPLs, skincare, supplements, meds etc.

    Modelling branches off into many areas, catwalk, photographic, promotional etc. To answer your question about whether the lights bother me. Well 2 or 3 years ago, I would have said absolutely yes!!! However due to the extreme care that I take with myself and my regular IPLs, my skin actually looks better than it has ever looked. I am always complimented on my complexion. Sadly, the scars of my traumatic experience stop me from fully appreciating the compliments I am once again receiving.

    I am working with a counsellor who specialises in helping those who have chronic or terminal illnessess. She has been a god send for me.

    I know it will be a long time before I feel confident again, no matter how many times people admire me and say so. Rosacea has left me deeply scarred and left me with a very vivid memory of my darkest moments.

    As for being scrutinised, I am used to this because this happens normally in the modelling industry but since rosacea, nothing is ever the same.

    So I thank God that he has restored my looks to the point where my skin has never been so smooth and soft and now I must continue my struggle to gain full remission. My biggest problem is neuropathic pain.

    Anyway, I shall email you personally Sally Ann as I don't want to bore those that would like to further discuss this topic.

    Oh and Justin, Sally Ann has an excellent point about experimenting in the most natural light possible, just skip the lippie and mascara ok ;) Make sure you let us know how you go too.

    Mermaid.

  10. #10
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    Mermaid, thanks for the PM, i am up to my neck in work at the mo so yr'll have to forgive my short reply. i just wanted to say that i think everything youve accomplished is remarkable and i admire yr tenacity in not letting this condition beat you down.

    I forgot to ask viw PM how you think yr rosacea came about? (you can answer that by PM if you wish lol, very rude to go around hijacking peoples threads )

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