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Thread: Reliant on fans?

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    Default Reliant on fans?

    Is anyone else super reliant on a fan during the day / while sitting down? Anytime I do any serious work, reading, coding, etc. I need to have my ceiling fan on and a smaller fan on my desk pointed right at me. It's like my nervous system can't handle reading a book or mental stimulation without some airflow, otherwise I'll flush. I can read outside fine or even just standing up lmao.

    It sucks but it's the only way to cope. Meanwhile, my sister, who has rosy cheeks/rosacea but no flushing, sits in front of a heater all day, which would give me a panic attack + flushing.
    Last edited by beherenow; 20th January 2021 at 04:40 AM.

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    I have a fan on at some point nearly every day.
    Ive got one in the lounge,bedroom and a couple of hand held ones.

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    I've been known to have the air con on in Winter........Fans in our joint are virtually 24/7, drives the Mrs nuts lol

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    Quote Originally Posted by beherenow View Post
    Is anyone else super reliant on a fan during the day / while sitting down? Anytime I do any serious work, reading, coding, etc. I need to have my ceiling fan on and a smaller fan on my desk pointed right at me. It's like my nervous system can't handle reading a book or mental stimulation without some airflow, otherwise I'll flush. I can read outside fine or even just standing up lmao.

    It sucks but it's the only way to cope. Meanwhile, my sister, who has rosy cheeks/rosacea but no flushing, sits in front of a heater all day, which would give me a panic attack + flushing.
    My flushing is very sensitive to wi-fi so if I was coding without the computer being on the ethernet I would certainly flush - similarly if I was reading on a wireless device. I do have an air conditioner which is very helpful but the activities you suggest don't necessarily provoke my flushing when reading old fashioned books or using a wired computer - Apple devices are some of the worst for people who are sensitive to EMF fields.

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    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
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    Are you aware of A PRACTICAL UNDERSTANDING OF ROSACEA
    PART 1:
    HEAT REGULATION AND THE
    WARM ROOM FLUSH PHENOMENON
    By Colin Dahl
    ???
    Brady Barrows
    Blog - Join the RRDi



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    Quote Originally Posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    Are you aware of A PRACTICAL UNDERSTANDING OF ROSACEA
    PART 1:
    HEAT REGULATION AND THE
    WARM ROOM FLUSH PHENOMENON
    By Colin Dahl
    ???
    Has anyone on this thread found it effective?

    I do worry that my reliance on fans / cool environments has made me more sensitive. I no longer live on the east coast so I don't have to deal with the drastic change in temperature environments, which sucked quite a bit at the time. Heated rooms are my kryptonite.

    However, almost 90% of my flushing, is my overactive nervous system. My house is usually ~71 degrees. It's usually just the slightest bit of stress, anxiety, embarrassment, overfocus, etc. that triggers me. Getting deeply into a book and I need a fan. I'm even wary about important phone / video calls, I usually have a fan on or take a beta blocker. Beta blockers have been the only saving grace. I'd take it every day if I wasn't concerned about hair loss and tolerance.

    It's always sitting down by the way too, kinda strange.
    Last edited by beherenow; 4th February 2021 at 06:53 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by beherenow View Post
    Has anyone on this thread found it effective?

    I do worry that my reliance on fans / cool environments has made me more sensitive. I no longer live on the east coast so I don't have to deal with the drastic change in temperature environments, which sucked quite a bit at the time. Heated rooms are my kryptonite.

    However, almost 90% of my flushing, is my overactive nervous system. My house is usually ~71 degrees. It's usually just the slightest bit of stress, anxiety, embarrassment, overfocus, etc. that triggers me. Getting deeply into a book and I need a fan. I'm even wary about important phone / video calls, I usually have a fan on or take a beta blocker. Beta blockers have been the only saving grace. I'd take it every day if I wasn't concerned about hair loss and tolerance.

    It's always sitting down by the way too, kinda strange.
    Yeah I've found the warm room syndrome helpful. For example, I wear a hat over my ears outside - this stops them becoming very cold outside and then rebounding. However, you may well need to take medications consistently to control the blood flow effectively - as well as beta blockers, there are alpha blockers, hydroxychloroquine, gabapentin etc. But you could try just a day without using your phone and wi fi and see if it improves - the warm room syndrome idea and medicines wouldn't work well for me if I didn't avoid wireless technologies which are terrible for my flushing (especially ears).

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    Senior Member laser_cat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by antwantsclear View Post
    My flushing is very sensitive to wi-fi so if I was coding without the computer being on the ethernet I would certainly flush - similarly if I was reading on a wireless device. I do have an air conditioner which is very helpful but the activities you suggest don't necessarily provoke my flushing when reading old fashioned books or using a wired computer - Apple devices are some of the worst for people who are sensitive to EMF fields.
    very interesting (I'm a coder too) - i should try this as an experiment

    I've learned I'm very light sensitive. So right now I was trying to just find a zinc sunscreen to block out UV, blue light, infra, etc. I think a delayed reaction, not obvious.

    Do screens affect you?

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    Quote Originally Posted by beherenow View Post
    Has anyone on this thread found it effective?

    I do worry that my reliance on fans / cool environments has made me more sensitive. I no longer live on the east coast so I don't have to deal with the drastic change in temperature environments, which sucked quite a bit at the time. Heated rooms are my kryptonite.

    However, almost 90% of my flushing, is my overactive nervous system. My house is usually ~71 degrees. It's usually just the slightest bit of stress, anxiety, embarrassment, overfocus, etc. that triggers me. Getting deeply into a book and I need a fan. I'm even wary about important phone / video calls, I usually have a fan on or take a beta blocker. Beta blockers have been the only saving grace. I'd take it every day if I wasn't concerned about hair loss and tolerance.

    It's always sitting down by the way too, kinda strange.
    Yes, excessive cooling makes me more sensitive over time. I know some people have to do it. The pain, heat, flushing are just too much otherwise. So they live a limited life at home where they can control the temp. I know they've played with temps a lot and understand that this is the best situation for them. I have to control temp to a large degree - but mostly in the sense it needs to be a constant temp. I'm very sensitive to change. Without medication, I was tempted to make thermostat 60 deg

    I'm so sorry you have this problem. I know it can feel at times too much to deal with.

    Honestly, it sounds like the pros of the beta blocker daily outweigh the negatives. Maybe use rogaine, biotin, collagen powder etc for the hair loss. I understand everyone is different about what side effects they are willing to tolerate, though.
    Last edited by laser_cat; 4th February 2021 at 02:40 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by beherenow View Post

    It's always sitting down by the way too, kinda strange.
    This happens to me too. At my worst I can't sit down for an extended period of time in the evening without flushing. Lying down is the worst, I have to sleep on a wedge pillow which helps.

    Once I stand up and walk around the flushing lessens. It seems to be related to my posture or perhaps bad circulation, the blood just pools or gets stuck in my face or ears if I'm not literally forcing it down with gravity by standing up.

    I also have to have some form of airflow always like an open window but for me it can't get too cold as that would trigger rebound flushing later. I'm best when the temperature is stable. Cold weather is the worst for me. I have thermometers in every room and I've noticed if the temperature drops below 63 degrees during sleep I will most definitely have a bad evening flushing.

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