Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 16 of 16

Thread: An update from me!

  1. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Posts
    154

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Judworth View Post
    https://dicksonchemist.co.uk/new/contact-us/


    Is it worth contacting the above to see if they will deliver to you?

    J
    You?re so good Judy! I?ll contact them tomorrow. Thank you so much.
    Molly

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,712
    Country: UK

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Momof View Post
    You?re so good Judy! I?ll contact them tomorrow. Thank you so much.
    Molly

    I wish you every success!

    J
    SUFFER FROM NEUROPATHIC ROSACEA & OCULAR ROSACEA SINCE 2002.


    *Vit D3,Theratears Omega 3.



    *LDN since October 2018.

    *REN skincare range. TARTE cosmetics.

    *Tried Clonidine, Moxonidine & Atenolol (None being taken at present ).

    *Yearly IPL treatments until 2009.

    * RLT Journey!" (Sept 09) **Using Britebox Revive..(Stopped ).



    History of Hyperthyroidism (Graves) Lichen Planus (oral)
    PROUD TO BE DIFFERENT






    .

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,712
    Country: UK

    Default LDN info for those interested.

    LDNNow

    "New hope for treating chronic pain without opioids"
    According to some estimates, chronic pain affects up to 40% of Americans, and treating it frustrates both clinicians and patients??a frustration that's often compounded by a hesitation to prescribe opioids for pain.
    A new study from the University of Michigan School of Dentistry confirms that a low dose of a drug called naltrexone is a good option for patients with orofacial and chronic pain, without the risk of addiction, said first author Elizabeth Hatfield, a clinical lecturer in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Hospital Dentistry.
    "We found a reduction in pain intensity and improvement in quality of life, and a reduction in opioid use for patients with chronic pain," said Hatfield, who hopes to initiate a randomized control trial of low dose naltrexone.
    Low doses of naltrexone (0.1-4.5 mg) works by acting on a unique cellular pathway in the nervous system through which it delivers chronic pain relief without opioids, Hatfield said. If patients are working with a physician to treat pain, it's appropriate for them to raise the topic of low-dose naltrexone as a possible alternative.
    Chronic pain is pain that persists for several months, or after the initial injury or trauma has healed, and the way clinicians and scientists think about chronic pain is changing. It's now thought that some chronic pain has more to do with how our body reports pain to the brain, than the actual injury.
    This concept of the nervous system being sensitized is promoted by cells called glial cells. Low-dose naltrexone targets these cells that keep the nervous system sensitized, thereby reducing the pain threshold and the sensitivity of the nervous system over time.
    Traditional pain management has focused on treating the injury or trauma site, but low-dose naltrexone works on the overactive nervous system.
    "Low-dose naltrexone begins to address the cause of pain and not just mask it, which allows us to better target diseases causing chronic pain, as well as potentially consider pain control outside of opioid use," Hatfield said.
    SUFFER FROM NEUROPATHIC ROSACEA & OCULAR ROSACEA SINCE 2002.


    *Vit D3,Theratears Omega 3.



    *LDN since October 2018.

    *REN skincare range. TARTE cosmetics.

    *Tried Clonidine, Moxonidine & Atenolol (None being taken at present ).

    *Yearly IPL treatments until 2009.

    * RLT Journey!" (Sept 09) **Using Britebox Revive..(Stopped ).



    History of Hyperthyroidism (Graves) Lichen Planus (oral)
    PROUD TO BE DIFFERENT






    .

  4. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2021
    Posts
    13
    Country: Ireland

    Default

    Hi Judworth, great to hear you have found a successful treatment! I don't know much about LDN at all. What exactly is the mechanism in which it benefits rosacea? Does it just have an anti-anxiety effect or does it physically prevent flushing? Can you get it without a prescription if it's low dose?

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    1,712
    Country: UK

    Default

    Hello!

    All I know is that it has knocked out my facial nerve pain! The less pain, the less flushing and vice versa.

    We cannot get it here in the UK on the NHS, but I get mine from:
    Dickson Chemist
    35 mitchell arcade
    rutherglen
    scotland, Lanarkshire G73 2LS
    United Kingdom

    I have neuropathic rosacea (pain with or without flushing) sometimes heat flushing and sometimes cold!

    J
    SUFFER FROM NEUROPATHIC ROSACEA & OCULAR ROSACEA SINCE 2002.


    *Vit D3,Theratears Omega 3.



    *LDN since October 2018.

    *REN skincare range. TARTE cosmetics.

    *Tried Clonidine, Moxonidine & Atenolol (None being taken at present ).

    *Yearly IPL treatments until 2009.

    * RLT Journey!" (Sept 09) **Using Britebox Revive..(Stopped ).



    History of Hyperthyroidism (Graves) Lichen Planus (oral)
    PROUD TO BE DIFFERENT






    .

  6. #16
    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Centre, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    5,462

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Judworth View Post
    LDNNow

    "New hope for treating chronic pain without opioids"
    According to some estimates, chronic pain affects up to 40% of Americans, and treating it frustrates both clinicians and patients??a frustration that's often compounded by a hesitation to prescribe opioids for pain.
    A new study from the University of Michigan School of Dentistry confirms that a low dose of a drug called naltrexone is a good option for patients with orofacial and chronic pain, without the risk of addiction, said first author Elizabeth Hatfield, a clinical lecturer in the Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery and Hospital Dentistry.
    "We found a reduction in pain intensity and improvement in quality of life, and a reduction in opioid use for patients with chronic pain," said Hatfield, who hopes to initiate a randomized control trial of low dose naltrexone.
    Low doses of naltrexone (0.1-4.5 mg) works by acting on a unique cellular pathway in the nervous system through which it delivers chronic pain relief without opioids, Hatfield said. If patients are working with a physician to treat pain, it's appropriate for them to raise the topic of low-dose naltrexone as a possible alternative.
    Chronic pain is pain that persists for several months, or after the initial injury or trauma has healed, and the way clinicians and scientists think about chronic pain is changing. It's now thought that some chronic pain has more to do with how our body reports pain to the brain, than the actual injury.
    This concept of the nervous system being sensitized is promoted by cells called glial cells. Low-dose naltrexone targets these cells that keep the nervous system sensitized, thereby reducing the pain threshold and the sensitivity of the nervous system over time.
    Traditional pain management has focused on treating the injury or trauma site, but low-dose naltrexone works on the overactive nervous system.
    "Low-dose naltrexone begins to address the cause of pain and not just mask it, which allows us to better target diseases causing chronic pain, as well as potentially consider pain control outside of opioid use," Hatfield said.
    Nice article. Do you have the citation link to this article, please? Nevermind, I googled it and found it.
    Brady Barrows
    Blog - Join the RRDi



Similar Threads

  1. Update
    By Bob Bear in forum Low level light based therapies
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 19th May 2007, 08:17 PM
  2. MY UPDATE
    By FLYBOY109 in forum General rosacea questions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 15th October 2006, 02:47 PM
  3. My Update....
    By Canada Dude in forum Prescription medications
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 16th September 2006, 05:46 PM
  4. Anyone update?
    By cheesy in forum Topical and oral products (non-prescription)
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 9th July 2006, 11:45 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •