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Thread: Energy Drinks/Building tolerance

  1. #1
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    Default Energy Drinks/Building tolerance

    Hello all,

    I was here years ago under a different name, and while my skin never got better I managed to forget about it (ish) for a time. However, a month or so I was put on sertraline, and around the same time I started drinking energy drinks. I'm fairly sure both were bad for my skin, but while I was willing to quit the sertraline, I stuck with the energy drinks as I don't sleep well and need to feel "awake" to write. (I'm trying to be a novelist. It's pretty much my only purpose in life.)

    As a consequence however my skin has flared up again; I'm getting nose flushes which I haven't had in ages, and just in general I'm much more inflamed and sensitive than before. My question, then, is will my skin eventually learn to endure the energy drinks? I ask, because when I first developed the condition, sugar and chocolate and, well, loads of stuff seemed to aggravate it, but after a while they ceased to have any real effect. Is it possible energy drinks will be like that too? Please say yes, ha ha.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
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    What are the ingredients in your current energy drink? What are the total carbohydrate grams shown on the Nutrition Facts Label? As you have pointed out, in the past, you discovered that "sugar and chocolate seemed to aggravate it." Sugar and carbohydrate are indeed rosacea triggers. According to one source, "Some energy drinks can pack up to 62 grams of sugar-or 15 1/2 teaspoons' worth-per 16-ounce can. That can easily stack up to 250 calories a can-about as much as a 20-ounce bottle of cola."

    One paper on Energy Beverages states, "Moreover, EBs supply an amount of carbohydrate far beyond that recommended for physically active people, which can slow the rate at which fluid is absorbed into the bloodstream or lead to gastrointestinal distress.'

    If you simply used the ingredients in your energy beverage minus the sugar you would probably still get the same effects without the rosacea.
    Last edited by Brady Barrows; 24th March 2020 at 12:13 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ASordidGod View Post
    Hello all,

    I was here years ago under a different name, and while my skin never got better I managed to forget about it (ish) for a time. However, a month or so I was put on sertraline, and around the same time I started drinking energy drinks. I'm fairly sure both were bad for my skin, but while I was willing to quit the sertraline, I stuck with the energy drinks as I don't sleep well and need to feel "awake" to write. (I'm trying to be a novelist. It's pretty much my only purpose in life.)

    As a consequence however my skin has flared up again; I'm getting nose flushes which I haven't had in ages, and just in general I'm much more inflamed and sensitive than before. My question, then, is will my skin eventually learn to endure the energy drinks? I ask, because when I first developed the condition, sugar and chocolate and, well, loads of stuff seemed to aggravate it, but after a while they ceased to have any real effect. Is it possible energy drinks will be like that too? Please say yes, ha ha.
    Hello! It seems you have discovered one of the biggest rosacea triggers: sugar. Even “sugar free” energy drinks are loaded with sugar substitutes and chemicals. Brady is right: there are options that have the natural energy ingredients without the high levels of sugars, colors, preservatives in most of these drinks. My personal favorite is the Citrus Energy Fizz Stick (a single packet you add to a bottle of water) which contains antioxidants, green tea, guarana and ginseng, B vitamins and cane sugar (less than 2 grams). On a side note, when you drink too many stimulants during the day it disrupts your sleep! Which will of course irritate your rosacea- and around and around it goes! Good luck!!

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    im on sertraline as wel.

    Now you say this i have noticed nose flushes

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    Most of energy drinks contains :

    - caffeine
    - taurine
    - niacine
    - B6
    - B12


    Most of these ingredients are there to make it look like : "Eh! Look, I have vitamins so I give energy!"

    Niacin and B12 are known to slightly increase blood flow, but in fact, only caffeine has a real exiting effect.

    Basically, if you just want to get the "awakening" effect, just drink coffee, or take a caffeine supplement.

    Limiting sugar, especially this kind of drink full of bull**** is surely a very good idea for your health in general.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TSW1988 View Post
    im on sertraline as wel.

    Now you say this i have noticed nose flushes
    Yeah, I took it for a week or so but my skin got a lot worse. So I looked it up, and sertraline is a vasodilator. (Spl?) Meaning it dilates the blood vessels, which is the last thing one wants with rosacea. I quit it straight away. Obviously I wouldn't blindly recommend you doing that - I'd only just started it for one - but personally speaking, I didn't want to take the risk of it getting worse. If you think it might be a problem in your case, I'd talk to your doctor. They might well say I'm talking nonsense. God knows it wouldn't be the first time.

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    Thanks for the replies.

    Anyway, yes, I'm well aware of how terrible energy drinks are in terms of sugar. The thing is though, like I said, for the last few years I've been eating loads of sugary stuff with little effect on my skin. This is in contrast to when I first developed rosacea, when almost anything would aggravate it. Which is why I wondered whether it was energy drinks in particular that was bad.

    What I'm thinking now, however, is that either it's the caffeine and not the sugar - I don't drink coffee - or that the few weeks on sertraline, and which is a vasodilator, has severely affected my skin long term, and returned it to bad old days.

    re the caffeine possibility: I've drunk coke and coke zero for years without effect, so I don't think it's that. And yet I tried a can today and my face was inflamed and painful. Which is why I'm worried it's the sertraline, and that I've done damage to my skin without realising. Has anyone had an experience with the drug, good or bad? Or indeed just an opinion either way? Am I crazy for suspecting such a thing. Hell of a coincidence otherwise though.

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    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ASordidGod View Post
    Thanks for the replies.

    Anyway, yes, I'm well aware of how terrible energy drinks are in terms of sugar. The thing is though, like I said, for the last few years I've been eating loads of sugary stuff with little effect on my skin. This is in contrast to when I first developed rosacea, when almost anything would aggravate it. Which is why I wondered whether it was energy drinks in particular that was bad.
    What I'm thinking now, however, is that either it's the caffeine and not the sugar - I don't drink coffee - or that the few weeks on sertraline, and which is a vasodilator, has severely affected my skin long term, and returned it to bad old days.
    re the caffeine possibility: I've drunk coke and coke zero for years without effect, so I don't think it's that. And yet I tried a can today and my face was inflamed and painful. Which is why I'm worried it's the sertraline, and that I've done damage to my skin without realising. Has anyone had an experience with the drug, good or bad? Or indeed just an opinion either way? Am I crazy for suspecting such a thing. Hell of a coincidence otherwise though.
    Let's take caffeine first:
    "Our findings do not support limiting caffeine intake as a means to prevent rosacea.' source

    How much sugar is in a can of coke? 44 grams or 9 teaspoons in a 16 ounce container. Furthermore, the effects of sugar intake is accumulative in the blood increasing insulin and basically you are fueling your rosacea.



    High Sugar Content Leads to Inflammation.

    As for Sertraline (Zoloft), which is a SSRI, many have reported this drug helps reducing flushing. Use the search box and type in 'sertraline' or 'Zoloft' and spend about twenty minutes browsing the different threads on those who use it.
    Last edited by Brady Barrows; 26th March 2020 at 01:06 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ASordidGod View Post
    Yeah, I took it for a week or so but my skin got a lot worse. So I looked it up, and sertraline is a vasodilator. (Spl?) Meaning it dilates the blood vessels, which is the last thing one wants with rosacea. I quit it straight away. Obviously I wouldn't blindly recommend you doing that - I'd only just started it for one - but personally speaking, I didn't want to take the risk of it getting worse. If you think it might be a problem in your case, I'd talk to your doctor. They might well say I'm talking nonsense. God knows it wouldn't be the first time.
    hi,

    tbh i had a red nose before taking sertraline.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ASordidGod View Post
    Hello all,

    I was here years ago under a different name, and while my skin never got better I managed to forget about it (ish) for a time. However, a month or so I was put on sertraline, and around the same time I started drinking energy drinks. I'm fairly sure both were bad for my skin, but while I was willing to quit the sertraline, I stuck with the energy drinks as I don't sleep well and need to feel "awake" to write. (I'm trying to be a novelist. It's pretty much my only purpose in life.)

    As a consequence however my skin has flared up again; I'm getting nose flushes which I haven't had in ages, and just in general I'm much more inflamed and sensitive than before. My question, then, is will my skin eventually learn to endure the energy drinks? I ask, because when I first developed the condition, sugar and chocolate and, well, loads of stuff seemed to aggravate it, but after a while they ceased to have any real effect. Is it possible energy drinks will be like that too? Please say yes, ha ha.
    When you were reacting to food when it first developed, how long did it take you to stop reacting to food and getting nose flushes. I'm surprised that you say food ceased to have an effect.
    Energy drinks I find are the worse trigger for a flush or delayed flush compared to anything in my experience, even compared drinking alcohol and spirits. I doubt it was the Sertraline, I tried it for 4 months years ago and it had no effect on flushing, good or bad.
    Food seems to drive this condition, also complicated with a delayed trigger effect depending on the food..

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