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Thread: Should type 1 rosacea people use metrogel,soolantra,finacea etc?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mistica View Post
    Perhaps your use of topical lemon juice, followed by sun exposure has resulted in a case of phytophotodermatitis?

    https://www.verywellfamily.com/sun-a...d-match-616635

    I realise you don't have blisters but still the connection is still worth considering.

    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/art...d-risk-factors

    Perhaps the lemon juice+UV interaction was enough to trigger rosacea.

    Have you tried taking antihistamines?

    I second the trial of ZZ cream, heavily diluted. It has anti inflammatory properties.
    I agree lemon juice (and Mirvaso) sound a very aggressive approach - not likely to help.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by antwantsclear View Post
    I highly recommend that you don't take vitamin k - it causes clotting of the blood vessels, which is really not a good idea in type 1 rosacea. I noticed the bad effects of it just taking vitamin k for a few days. Topical vitamin k may be useful but certainly not orally.

    The medicines that are useful, if you go to a dermatologist who is expert in treating rosacea, are clonidine, moxonodine, hyroxychloroquine, gabapentin etc.

    Soolantra may be helpful too.
    Wow really? Thanks for the heads up. I will stop. I thought vitamin K would've been a good thing to take for rosacea because it can heal damaged blood vessels. I was taking a high dose aswell.

    The thing I'm still not sure about is when I've read a small description about soolantra it seems to be a medicine for those with dermodex mites, which I don't think I have because mine was triggered by the sun rather than coming about randomly. Are any of the medicines you just mentioned for blood vessel sun damage?!

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mistica View Post
    Perhaps your use of topical lemon juice, followed by sun exposure has resulted in a case of phytophotodermatitis?

    https://www.verywellfamily.com/sun-a...d-match-616635

    I realise you don't have blisters but still the connection is still worth considering.

    https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/art...d-risk-factors

    Perhaps the lemon juice+UV interaction was enough to trigger rosacea.

    Have you tried taking antihistamines?

    I second the trial of ZZ cream, heavily diluted. It has anti inflammatory properties.
    Yes I thought in the beginning it was Phytophotodermatitis. But I've had this redness now coming up to 8 months. From the articles I've read Phytophotodermatitis quickly fades by itself after a few weeks. Also my skin is red but no pigment change, I haven't got darker skin associated with sun damage. I will say though my skin is now super sensitive to where if I put anything besides cold water it stings and becomes more red particularly moisturisers and serums, I'm not sure if everybody with rosacea has this?

    My only theory at this point is the acid from lemons weakened my skin barrier then the suns uv rays damaged my blood vessels underneath and made them permently dialited.

    I haven't taken antihistamines, I've been trying to avoid the sunlight completely by working at home, which thankfully my job allows me to. I've gone pale, probably my vitamin d is very low from not leaving the house much.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    Adding Mirvaso surely added to your issues as you discovered. Sometimes it is just best to let you skin heal for some days on its own and only apply water, some even say only use distilled water since the chlorine in water is also irritating to sensitive skin. Some have mentioned using pure aloe vera plant cuttings (the gel from the actual plant). You may want to use treatments for burns on your skin and, of course, do a small patch test to see if it irritates the area or actually improves your skin.
    That's the problem I'm debating in my head, if my skin barrier is very damaged do I just stop putting anything on it topically altogether for months? Does the skin barrier heal on its own ? I know you can buy skin barrier creams but every moisturiser type I've used on my skin since then has irritated my face and made it more red and burning.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    Adding Mirvaso surely added to your issues as you discovered. Sometimes it is just best to let you skin heal for some days on its own and only apply water, some even say only use distilled water since the chlorine in water is also irritating to sensitive skin. Some have mentioned using pure aloe vera plant cuttings (the gel from the actual plant). You may want to use treatments for burns on your skin and, of course, do a small patch test to see if it irritates the area or actually improves your skin.
    Like I said in my original post though, I was also looking into getting a v beam/pulse dye laser. But is that a good idea if my skin barrier is damaged or could it make things worse in your professional opinion?

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by LawrenceK View Post
    Like I said in my original post though, I was also looking into getting a v beam/pulse dye laser. But is that a good idea if my skin barrier is damaged or could it make things worse in your professional opinion?
    I am not professional. You will have to ask your physician who administers v beam/pulse dye laser. You can spend some time reading through these posts on laser. What I have noticed that while some may rave about photo dynamic therapy for rosacea, these ones still have to return after some time, months usually, and have followup treatments. Most, if not all, rosacea treatments have to continue, since remission is rare. What you may want to review is the post on nutritional deficiencies in rosacea which may help you in your search. Another post worth considering is when rosacea resists standard therapies.
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  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by LawrenceK View Post
    Like I said in my original post though, I was also looking into getting a v beam/pulse dye laser. But is that a good idea if my skin barrier is damaged or could it make things worse in your professional opinion?
    I am not a professional either but from my personal experience, I think it would be a very bad idea to do laser or anything similar. Those machines wreck the skin barrier so you would have much worse sensitivity afterwards. I started laser with totally normal skin ( just a few broken veins) and I have been left with sensitivity, swelling, flushing, pain and worse broken veins than before as my skin has become so weak.

  8. #18
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    Last edited by Brady Barrows; 18th March 2020 at 04:38 PM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    It seem to be a special type of microscope with a particular light which allows doctors to examine skin better

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    Adding Mirvaso surely added to your issues as you discovered. Sometimes it is just best to let you skin heal for some days on its own and only apply water, some even say only use distilled water since the chlorine in water is also irritating to sensitive skin. Some have mentioned using pure aloe vera plant cuttings (the gel from the actual plant). You may want to use treatments for burns on your skin and, of course, do a small patch test to see if it irritates the area or actually improves your skin.
    I tried today putting raw aloe Vera from plant on my face for about 15 mins then washed it off when it dried, it actually temporarily reduced the redness, however it started to burn and irritate my skin after a few hours.

    Done some reading on various websites as well as old posts from here. And decided to try some products.

    I went shopping today on Amazon, bought a few products from cerave:- the hydrating cleanser & pm facial moisturising lotion. I've seen a lot of people recommending niacinamide so I bought a cream and also 500mg pills.

    Other thing I bought was topical oils, apparently very good for repairing skin barrier, blood vessels, uv damage and creating new skin cells. I got jojoba oil, pomegranate seed oil, safflower oil, avocado oil and grapeseed oil.

    I read this article saying it takes moderate to highly damaged skin from 6 months to a year to heal. Anyway I'll let you know how these products go.

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