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Thread: Low Dose Clonidine

  1. #1
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    Default Low Dose Clonidine

    I started taking Clonidine 4 weeks ago, only 1 tablet a day - 25mcg at night - about 1hr before I go to bed. This is to stop flushing that happens at night. It is working very well right from the first tablet, but the surprise is it has stopped me flushing from food during the day.
    From reading the forums and old posts here most take it every few hours and at much larger doses. Anyone else had this type of success at this or lower doses.
    I'm even now thinking of reducing it and taking 25mcg once every other day to see if it has the same effect.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mknlvi View Post
    I started taking Clonidine 4 weeks ago, only 1 tablet a day - 25mcg at night - about 1hr before I go to bed. This is to stop flushing that happens at night. It is working very well right from the first tablet, but the surprise is it has stopped me flushing from food during the day.
    From reading the forums and old posts here most take it every few hours and at much larger doses. Anyone else had this type of success at this or lower doses.
    I'm even now thinking of reducing it and taking 25mcg once every other day to see if it has the same effect.

    Never though about Clonidine because I thought it only stops flushing from anxiety related reasons? You say the Clonidine stops you flushing from triggers as well.
    I am trying to decide what to use next and thinking about Clonidine or a Beta Blocker. From reading about Clonidine, wouldn't a dose a day then missing a day be like starting and stopping it continually which could be dangerous?? anyone with experience of this.
    Last edited by Johndlwdbm; 17th January 2020 at 04:05 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johndlwdbm View Post
    Never though about Clonidine because I thought it only stops flushing from anxiety related reasons? You say the Clonidine stops you flushing from triggers as well.
    I am trying to decide what to use next and thinking about Clonidine or a Beta Blocker. From reading about Clonidine, wouldn't a dose a day then missing a day be like starting and stopping it continually which could be dangerous?? anyone with experience of this.
    Clonidine can reduce blood pressure a little though not that effectively, and this effect tends to reduce over time, so it can help with food flushing a bit (e.g. from a heavy carbohydrate load), but it's not as effective as modern alpha blockers like moxonodine. Some people find that they need both an alpha blocker and a beta-blocker, though beta blockers (e.g. propranolol) are more helpful for anxiety-related flushing not other triggers. If you say what your particular triggers are, people may be able to make suggestions for help with those.

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    Quote Originally Posted by antwantsclear View Post
    Clonidine can reduce blood pressure a little though not that effectively, and this effect tends to reduce over time, so it can help with food flushing a bit (e.g. from a heavy carbohydrate load), but it's not as effective as modern alpha blockers like moxonodine. Some people find that they need both an alpha blocker and a beta-blocker, though beta blockers (e.g. propranolol) are more helpful for anxiety-related flushing not other triggers. If you say what your particular triggers are, people may be able to make suggestions for help with those.

    My main triggers are laying down, unavoidably when I sleep at night, this always brings on a big flush and also flushing from after eating. I have found it impossible to avoid the flushing when sleeping. What do you think about clonidine at these doses or even one every other day.
    Searching the forums I came across this
    https://rosaceagroup.org/The_Rosacea...730#post318730
    The poster Souris24 had success using Clonidine when laying down and flushing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johndlwdbm View Post
    My main triggers are laying down, unavoidably when I sleep at night, this always brings on a big flush and also flushing from after eating. I have found it impossible to avoid the flushing when sleeping. What do you think about clonidine at these doses or even one every other day.
    Searching the forums I came across this
    https://rosaceagroup.org/The_Rosacea...730#post318730
    The poster Souris24 had success using Clonidine when laying down and flushing.
    As you say, laying down is the hardest time to avoid flushing. Various forms of cool pads to put under the pillow case can help - what used to be sold as "chillow".

    For my own case of flushing, I have needed a blood pressure medication and anti-inflammatory medication (e.g. hydroxychloroquine). I also take gabapentin. Some people use mirtazapine as the anti-inflammatory.

    A little spray bottle can help to take the flush away:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Higher-Natu...9294823&sr=8-5

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    Quote Originally Posted by antwantsclear View Post
    As you say, laying down is the hardest time to avoid flushing. Various forms of cool pads to put under the pillow case can help - what used to be sold as "chillow".

    For my own case of flushing, I have needed a blood pressure medication and anti-inflammatory medication (e.g. hydroxychloroquine). I also take gabapentin. Some people use mirtazapine as the anti-inflammatory.

    A little spray bottle can help to take the flush away:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Higher-Natu...9294823&sr=8-5
    Tried various chillow pillows without any success, I don't even think heat is the main problem. It is the act of laying down itself, it must increase blood flow to the head in general that sets of a massive flush every night. If I stay up all night to work and don't lay down I will not flush in the night. Do you think Clonidine will help with that, from your experience with it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johndlwdbm View Post
    Tried various chillow pillows without any success, I don't even think heat is the main problem. It is the act of laying down itself, it must increase blood flow to the head in general that sets of a massive flush every night. If I stay up all night to work and don't lay down I will not flush in the night. Do you think Clonidine will help with that, from your experience with it.
    The chillow would be useless to me if I didn't take the medications - you will need to do a combination of things, but yes medications is probably the most important one. Clonidine by itself is unlikely to be effective - moxonodine is a more effective drug - they are both alpha blockers that impact on blood pressure. But you may well need to introduce an anti-inflammatory drug as well which will reduce inflammation in blood vessels and tissues as well- e.g. hydroxychloroquine. To me the combination of moxonodine and hydroxychloroquine is particularly effective.

    Diet is very important as well - no alcohol, no wheat, no rice, limited added sugar.

    How long have you had the nighttime flushing? If it is relatively new, you will probably find it gradually starts to get worse in other parts of your life too over time - nighttime flushing is particularly hard to control when you lie down, but you will probably start to flush in response to other things as the rosacea progresses. Clonidine may help stop this progression a little compared to taking no medicine at all, but it really is not a very effective medication, and its effect tends to reduce over time. There is a study on gabapentin you can show your doctor if they are helpful. How helpful is your current GP/dermatologist?

    If you have bad ear flushing, wearing a hat over the ears outside is VERY important - because they have a very strong flushing function and you get the so called 'warm room syndrome' - they get particularly cold in rosacea outside, then they get very hot inside in warm situations such as touching pillow.
    Last edited by antwantsclear; 19th January 2020 at 09:31 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by antwantsclear View Post
    The chillow would be useless to me if I didn't take the medications - you will need to do a combination of things, but yes medications is probably the most important one. Clonidine by itself is unlikely to be effective - moxonodine is a more effective drug - they are both alpha blockers that impact on blood pressure. But you may well need to introduce an anti-inflammatory drug as well which will reduce inflammation in blood vessels and tissues as well- e.g. hydroxychloroquine. To me the combination of moxonodine and hydroxychloroquine is particularly effective.

    Diet is very important as well - no alcohol, no wheat, no rice, limited added sugar.

    How long have you had the nighttime flushing? If it is relatively new, you will probably find it gradually starts to get worse in other parts of your life too over time - nighttime flushing is particularly hard to control when you lie down, but you will probably start to flush in response to other things as the rosacea progresses. Clonidine may help stop this progression a little compared to taking no medicine at all, but it really is not a very effective medication, and its effect tends to reduce over time. There is a study on gabapentin you can show your doctor if they are helpful. How helpful is your current GP/dermatologist?

    If you have bad ear flushing, wearing a hat over the ears outside is VERY important - because they have a very strong flushing function and you get the so called 'warm room syndrome' - they get particularly cold in rosacea outside, then they get very hot inside in warm situations such as touching pillow.

    I have had the laying down flushing for over 15 years, everyday at night without fail. Throughout the day it is more manageable if I watch what I eat, very strictly, but nothing stops the laying down flush when sleeping. The worse part is the nose swelling this causes even more so than the redness, that is the reason I am looking at clonidine because others have reported success with it stopping swelling also.
    Thanks for pointing out moxonodine, from reading others experiences using it on the forum, it seems it is milder and I don't know how well it would stop the swelling. I'll talk to my doctor, it might be safer to try this first and if it doesn't help the swelling, then try Clonidine.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johndlwdbm View Post
    Never though about Clonidine because I thought it only stops flushing from anxiety related reasons? You say the Clonidine stops you flushing from triggers as well.
    I am trying to decide what to use next and thinking about Clonidine or a Beta Blocker. From reading about Clonidine, wouldn't a dose a day then missing a day be like starting and stopping it continually which could be dangerous?? anyone with experience of this.
    Never had any anxiety problems or flushing in social situations with Rosacea. Clonidine is working for the flushing I have when going to sleep and food related flushing. It stops the swelling I presume because the flushing was causing my swelling, even smaller and subtler flushes caused swelling. I think it's working simply by restricting/regulating the blood flow in general to the extremities and my nose feels colder now.
    I tried a dose of .025mcg once every other day but had a small flush again, now I am back to once a day .025mcg taking it 1 hour before I go to sleep. My GP said to continue this regime for 6 months and to eat as health as possibly to see if the flushing stays in remission after I come off it.

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