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  1. #1
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    Default Is it catching ?

    Both me and my husband got blepharitis last year. I immediately suspected demodex as the normal treatment made both our eyes worse. I went to my old Doctors and said I think I’ve got Rosacea . He said no coz you haven’t got spots. But I kept telling my family I had rosacea and they said no you’ve not got spots. So I said I could feel it coming as skin was super sensitive. I was getting spots but sudecrem was keeping them at bay. Then blam the facial redness of rosacea kicked in and so did my husbands. I kept saying we needed to treat ourselves but everyone thought I was mad. Anyway I asked my new doctor for soolantra and she gave me some aswell as metrogel but I was confused as to what to use. So tried both but couldn’t figure out which was disagreeing with me.

    Anyway went privately and was immediately diagnosed with Rosacea and Seborrhoeic Dermatitis.
    Started Soolantra and so has my husband it seems to be working better for him than me.

    So my Question is ...... Is it catching ? Many say not but why both of us at the same time both started with Blepharitis first then the rosacea.

    We have Dogs but again neither have mange and again it’s not supposed to be from dogs anyway.

    What are your thoughts?

  2. #2
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    We aren't born with demodex. Its believed to be passed to a child by a caretaker. We "acquire" it starting at about age 5 when the oil glands develop. Studies have shown that by age 18 or so most of us have at least a few demodex. A normal healthy immune system keeps the population low and prevents any serious issue with them.

    I had a very serious bout with German Measles and possibly the flu at age 11.5. Instead of the usual 3 days, the measles lasted closer to 10-12 days -that is a known time range and an extreme case. My immune system was likely at rock bottom fighting off the virus. Skin problems started within 6 months to a year. It got worse with every bout of flu after that - fortunately I don't get the flu very often. My husband of many years has never had any serious problems with demodex and has never had rosacea.

    Demodex is transferred between people. But whether a person gets a full blown infestation or not will depend upon how strong their immune system is and how well it works to fight off the mites. They don't know exactly what chemical or enzyme in our skin controls the mite population. Hypochlorous Acid sprays help to kill off the mites and will kill immature mites. The hypochlorous acid in the sprays is a very weak solution. Human white blood cells produce hypochlorous acid to fight infections.

    Allegedly the similar types of demodex species that live on cats and dogs are not transferrable to humans. But some people who got demodex have said that their skin issues started after getting a mangy pet.

    Others have reported that upper respiratory infections, pregnancy, or viral infections like the flu, mononucleosis, etc. occurred in the months before their skin issues started. Were you and your husband sick with any type of illness in the months before the skin problems started?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by ElaineA View Post
    We aren't born with demodex. Its believed to be passed to a child by a caretaker. We "acquire" it starting at about age 5 when the oil glands develop. Studies have shown that by age 18 or so most of us have at least a few demodex. A normal healthy immune system keeps the population low and prevents any serious issue with them.

    I had a very serious bout with German Measles and possibly the flu at age 11.5. Instead of the usual 3 days, the measles lasted closer to 10-12 days -that is a known time range and an extreme case. My immune system was likely at rock bottom fighting off the virus. Skin problems started within 6 months to a year. It got worse with every bout of flu after that - fortunately I don't get the flu very often. My husband of many years has never had any serious problems with demodex and has never had rosacea.

    Demodex is transferred between people. But whether a person gets a full blown infestation or not will depend upon how strong their immune system is and how well it works to fight off the mites. They don't know exactly what chemical or enzyme in our skin controls the mite population. Hypochlorous Acid sprays help to kill off the mites and will kill immature mites. The hypochlorous acid in the sprays is a very weak solution. Human white blood cells produce hypochlorous acid to fight infections.

    Allegedly the similar types of demodex species that live on cats and dogs are not transferrable to humans. But some people who got demodex have said that their skin issues started after getting a mangy pet.

    Others have reported that upper respiratory infections, pregnancy, or viral infections like the flu, mononucleosis, etc. occurred in the months before their skin issues started. Were you and your husband sick with any type of illness in the months before the skin problems started?

    Actually yes we both did have a bad dose of a virus before our eye problems.
    Which I think has damaged my immune system as well as antibiotics.
    I also have tremors and chronic fatigue now with no explanation from Doctors.
    But I’ve read you can’t fix your immune system. I’m taking vitamin B complex and vitamin D at the moment. And come off all prescribed medication.
    Last edited by Rubydo1; 10th October 2019 at 04:56 PM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
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    Default There is still a lot of unanswered questions about demodex mites....

    "Routes of transmission are not fully known but it may occur by direct contact as well as through dust. While the skin of new-borns is free of Demodex folliculorum, colonization of the skin in humans takes place in childhood or early adulthood. Demodex mites are found in representatives of all human races and in all geographical areas.......Demodex mites were originally perceived to be commensals, having a symbiotic relationship with the human host."
    (Lacey et al., 2009)

    ".....Little is known about the transmission of mites among humans. Recent studies find that many symbiotic microbes are passed directly from mother to offspring during breast-feeding or during birth (especially if birth is vaginal), and dogs acquire their Demodex mites as nursing pups. In light of this, the same means of mite transmission seems possible in humans, supported by the fact that in one study, Demodex mites were found in 77% of nipple tissue from mastectomies....."

    "However, because these mites may occur in patches around the body, as in dogs, and all existing collection methods sample just small patches of skin (and even incompletely sample those patches), it is difficult to know to what extent the absence of mites in a sample equates to the absence of mites on the body. Intriguingly, in postmortem studies, mites appear to be present on all adult cadavers. The ubiquity of mites on cadavers might indicate they are universally present on living, adult humans but missed by current sampling methods. Alternately, conditions in which cadavers are found might facilitate colonization by mites and, in doing so, artificially inflate estimates of their incidence......"

    Plos | One
    Ubiquity and Diversity of Human-Associated Demodex Mites
    Megan S. Thoemmes , Daniel J. Fergus, Julie Urban, Michelle Trautwein, Robert R. Dunn

    For more information on the above two sources

    "In the examination of healthy people by light microscopy, Demodex mites were detected in 6 cases (2.8%). Given the ability of the mites to move over the surface of the skin at a speed of 8-16 mm/h, as well as random selection of the study site, this fact does not prove the absence of mites."

    "Demodex folliculorum shows signs of parasitism, while Demodex folliculorum brevis is a saprophyte."

    After 30 days of Ivermectin Treatment there is an INCREASE of demodex mites, however, the treatment improved rosacea in 30 days.

    Dermatol Reports. 2019 Jan 23; 11(1): 7675.
    Clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment of rosacea, complicated by Demodex mites
    Alexey Kubanov, Yuliya Gallyamova, and Anzhela Kravchenko

    For more information on the above source
    Brady Barrows
    Blog ē Join the RRDi



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    "Routes of transmission are not fully known but it may occur by direct contact as well as through dust. While the skin of new-borns is free of Demodex folliculorum, colonization of the skin in humans takes place in childhood or early adulthood. Demodex mites are found in representatives of all human races and in all geographical areas.......Demodex mites were originally perceived to be commensals, having a symbiotic relationship with the human host."
    (Lacey et al., 2009)

    ".....Little is known about the transmission of mites among humans. Recent studies find that many symbiotic microbes are passed directly from mother to offspring during breast-feeding or during birth (especially if birth is vaginal), and dogs acquire their Demodex mites as nursing pups. In light of this, the same means of mite transmission seems possible in humans, supported by the fact that in one study, Demodex mites were found in 77% of nipple tissue from mastectomies....."

    "However, because these mites may occur in patches around the body, as in dogs, and all existing collection methods sample just small patches of skin (and even incompletely sample those patches), it is difficult to know to what extent the absence of mites in a sample equates to the absence of mites on the body. Intriguingly, in postmortem studies, mites appear to be present on all adult cadavers. The ubiquity of mites on cadavers might indicate they are universally present on living, adult humans but missed by current sampling methods. Alternately, conditions in which cadavers are found might facilitate colonization by mites and, in doing so, artificially inflate estimates of their incidence......"

    Plos | One
    Ubiquity and Diversity of Human-Associated Demodex Mites
    Megan S. Thoemmes , Daniel J. Fergus, Julie Urban, Michelle Trautwein, Robert R. Dunn

    For more information on the above two sources

    "In the examination of healthy people by light microscopy, Demodex mites were detected in 6 cases (2.8%). Given the ability of the mites to move over the surface of the skin at a speed of 8-16 mm/h, as well as random selection of the study site, this fact does not prove the absence of mites."

    "Demodex folliculorum shows signs of parasitism, while Demodex folliculorum brevis is a saprophyte."

    After 30 days of Ivermectin Treatment there is an INCREASE of demodex mites, however, the treatment improved rosacea in 30 days.

    Dermatol Reports. 2019 Jan 23; 11(1): 7675.
    Clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment of rosacea, complicated by Demodex mites
    Alexey Kubanov, Yuliya Gallyamova, and Anzhela Kravchenko

    For more information on the above source
    Yes Iíve read this before. Itís the .....

    ďAfter 30 days of Ivermectin Treatment there is an INCREASE of demodex mites, however, the treatment improved rosacea in 30 daysĒ

    That confuses me as ivermectin is supposed to kill the mites

  6. #6
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    Demodex mite conditions are common in dogs and are treated with ivermectin often (e.g. they can get an itching condition of the ears caused by mites). There have been several posts in the past where people believe their rosacea was caused or made worse by demodex mites from dogs. I am always extremely cautious when I am around dogs, and would certainly never have one. I like dogs but it is not worth the risk if you have rosacea to me anyway.

    It is not that dogs will give you mites when you had none (because 95% of adults have them anyway), but that they will very significantly increase the number of mites on your body and face through prolonged contact (it is the larger number of demodex mites which is associated with rosacea, whereas non rosacea sufferers generally have much lower numbers).
    Last edited by antwantsclear; 11th October 2019 at 10:22 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    "Routes of transmission are not fully known but it may occur by direct contact as well as through dust. While the skin of new-borns is free of Demodex folliculorum, colonization of the skin in humans takes place in childhood or early adulthood. Demodex mites are found in representatives of all human races and in all geographical areas.......Demodex mites were originally perceived to be commensals, having a symbiotic relationship with the human host."
    (Lacey et al., 2009)

    ".....Little is known about the transmission of mites among humans. Recent studies find that many symbiotic microbes are passed directly from mother to offspring during breast-feeding or during birth (especially if birth is vaginal), and dogs acquire their Demodex mites as nursing pups. In light of this, the same means of mite transmission seems possible in humans, supported by the fact that in one study, Demodex mites were found in 77% of nipple tissue from mastectomies....."

    "However, because these mites may occur in patches around the body, as in dogs, and all existing collection methods sample just small patches of skin (and even incompletely sample those patches), it is difficult to know to what extent the absence of mites in a sample equates to the absence of mites on the body. Intriguingly, in postmortem studies, mites appear to be present on all adult cadavers. The ubiquity of mites on cadavers might indicate they are universally present on living, adult humans but missed by current sampling methods. Alternately, conditions in which cadavers are found might facilitate colonization by mites and, in doing so, artificially inflate estimates of their incidence......"

    Plos | One
    Ubiquity and Diversity of Human-Associated Demodex Mites
    Megan S. Thoemmes , Daniel J. Fergus, Julie Urban, Michelle Trautwein, Robert R. Dunn

    For more information on the above two sources

    "In the examination of healthy people by light microscopy, Demodex mites were detected in 6 cases (2.8%). Given the ability of the mites to move over the surface of the skin at a speed of 8-16 mm/h, as well as random selection of the study site, this fact does not prove the absence of mites."

    "Demodex folliculorum shows signs of parasitism, while Demodex folliculorum brevis is a saprophyte."

    After 30 days of Ivermectin Treatment there is an INCREASE of demodex mites, however, the treatment improved rosacea in 30 days.

    Dermatol Reports. 2019 Jan 23; 11(1): 7675.
    Clinical picture, diagnosis and treatment of rosacea, complicated by Demodex mites
    Alexey Kubanov, Yuliya Gallyamova, and Anzhela Kravchenko

    For more information on the above source
    The Russian study followed 212 patients and treated with topical Ivermectin (Soolantra). The Egyptian medical study from the 2013 International Journal of Infectious Diseases tested 2 oral treatments: Oral Ivermectin alone vs. the combined therapy of Oral Ivermectin + Oral Metronidazole.

    In the Egyptian study those on oral Ivermectin alone did have a slight increase in mite density after the first treatment. Mite density dropped steadily after that measurement. With the combined oral treatment mite density dropped off steadily and faster than with oral Ivermectin alone. The charts compares the 2 treatments by the decline in mite density in the paper here: https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...0197121201315X

    I have a theory about why the demodex mite density goes up temporarily after the first treatment. None of the treatment kills the mite eggs. It takes the mite eggs a few days to hatch after being laid. That is why at least 2 rounds of oral Ivermectin are recommended. Kill off most of the adults, then wait a week to kill off any mites that hatched. I suspect the number of mite hatchlings that survive may increase after most of the existing adults are dead. There's more food for them to eat, so more hatchlings survive. Until the next round of treatment knocks the hatchilings out, hopefully before they can reproduce.


    The medical trial study comparing demodex treatment using oral Ivermectin only vs. the combined 2 drug treatment with Oral Ivermectin and Oral Metronidazole has charts which show the number of mites measured over time for 120 patients. Its interesting because the mite density during treatment varies by what conditions the patients were diagnosed with. Blepharitis (eyes), perioral (around mouth), skin lesions, etc. Oral Ivermectin treatment alone did show a temporary increase in mite density after the first treatment, then it went down. The Eqyptian doctors didn't see that big increase in mite density after 30 days that the Russians using topical Ivermectin reported.

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