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Thread: Cerave SA Smoothing cleanser New to the UK

  1. #1
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    Default Cerave SA Smoothing cleanser New to the UK

    Ok Guys it’s early days but I seem to be having success with Cerave SA Smoothing cleanser.
    Just come back from derm and he was struggling to find the SD only a bit on the forehead.
    And the rosacea seems to be improved aswell. I have to say I was pleased to find someone so knowledgeable on both problems in the UK .
    He’s given me some advice on the rosacea and Sd treatment.
    Which I’m going to try.
    Plus dumping all drugs and going for acupuncture seems to be helping for me .
    Last edited by Rubydo1; 29th August 2019 at 03:53 PM.

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    Senior Member johnabetts's Avatar
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    Nothing special is revealed in the ingredients list, apart from some incompatibles and an ingredient banned in cosmetics:

    Purified Water, Cocamidopropyl Hydroxysultaine, Glycerin, Sodium Lauroyl Sarcosinate, Niacinamide, Gluconolactone, Sodium Methylcocoyl Taurate, PEG-150 Pentaerythrityl Tetrastearate, Salicylic Acid, Ceramide 6-II, Ceramide 3, Ceramide 1, Hyaluronic Acid, Cholesterol, Sodium Benzoate, Zea Mays (Corn) Oil, Disodium EDTA, Sodium Lauroyl Lactylate, Cholecalciferol, Phytosphingosine, Xanthan Gum, Carbomer, Sodium Hydroxide

    It contains niacinamide (as does Dermadexin and numerous other products), salicylic acid (a very old established ingredient in skin products). I am uncertain of the compatibility of these two items. It also contains sodium benzoate (will react with salicylic acid but not form anything of concern, merely slightly change the functionality of the two materials) and carbomer (with sodium hydroxide). It is most likely that the sodium hydroxide is present to neutralise the acidic nature of the carbomer to allow it to properly form a gel but, at the same time, it can react with the salicylic acid and interfere with the gel formation. Gluconolactone hydrolyses in the presence of water to form gluconic acid - nothing wrong with that per se but it is another ingredient that reacts with basic materials.

    An important point is that cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) is item 335 in the list of ingredients banned for use in cosmetic products in Europe (including, for the time being at least, the UK). COSING (ANNEX II, Last update: 13/08/2019 LIST OF SUBSTANCES PROHIBITED IN COSMETIC PRODUCTS). I am not intimating that there is anything wrong or dangerous about a small amount of this ingredient in a product, merely that it contravenes the current European Regulations.
    Last edited by johnabetts; 2nd September 2019 at 10:01 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnabetts View Post
    Nothing special is revealed in the ingredients list, apart from some incompatibles and an ingredient banned in cosmetics:

    Purified Water, Cocamidopropyl Hydroxysultaine, Glycerin, Sodium Lauroyl Sarcosinate, Niacinamide, Gluconolactone, Sodium Methylcocoyl Taurate, PEG-150 Pentaerythrityl Tetrastearate, Salicylic Acid, Ceramide 6-II, Ceramide 3, Ceramide 1, Hyaluronic Acid, Cholesterol, Sodium Benzoate, Zea Mays (Corn) Oil, Disodium EDTA, Sodium Lauroyl Lactylate, Cholecalciferol, Phytosphingosine, Xanthan Gum, Carbomer, Sodium Hydroxide

    It contains niacinamide (as does Dermadexin and numerous other products), salicylic acid (a very old established ingredient in skin products). I am uncertain of the compatibility of these two items. It also contains sodium benzoate (will react with salicylic acid but not form anything of concern, merely slightly change the functionality of the two materials) and carbomer (with sodium hydroxide). It is most likely that the sodium hydroxide is present to neutralise the acidic nature of the carbomer to allow it to properly form a gel but, at the same time, it can react with the salicylic acid and interfere with the gel formation. Gluconolactone hydrolyses in the presence of water to form gluconic acid - nothing wrong with that per se but it is another ingredient that reacts with basic materials.

    An important point is that cholecalciferol (vitamin D3) is item 335 in the list of ingredients banned for use in cosmetic products in Europe (including, for the time being at least, the UK). COSING (ANNEX II, Last update: 13/08/2019 LIST OF SUBSTANCES PROHIBITED IN COSMETIC PRODUCTS). I am not intimating that there is anything wrong or dangerous about a small amount of this ingredient in a product, merely that it contravenes the current European Regulations.
    Well it’s being sold in Europe and the UK now so maybe they changed the ingredients.
    It’s helped my skin so much. Husband is using it now aswell. And his skin has gone lovely and
    Clear and soft and his redness is fading. And I have hypersensitive skin and this is so gentle.
    I’ve literally tried everything on the market even moo goo,Kalme, the Ordinary, you name it I’ve tried it.
    My skin looks good well apart from the white heads but I’m 4 days into to using soolantra and apparently normal. But SD and major spots being kept a bay .
    Isn’t vit D good for skin didn’t Tom say something about that . Or might someone else .
    Last edited by Rubydo1; 5th September 2019 at 08:53 PM.

  4. #4
    Senior Member johnabetts's Avatar
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    The ingredients list I posted above was quoted from the Cerave website https://www.cerave.co.uk/our-product...thing-cleanser

    I have checked today and it still states that the product contains cholecalciferol.

    I am not suggesting that there is anything dangerous or undesirable in this ingredient being present in a cosmetic product. In fact, after spending a very large number of years in the cosmetic industry, the proscription of vitamin D has always struck me as rather odd. Whilst it is true that vitamin D is toxic in large quantities, so are a lot of other things!

    I am pleased the product works for you.

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    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
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    Yes johnabetts, the EU's position on the cosmetic use of cholecalciferol makes no sense to me either -- it's a common food additive in milk in many countries. Apparently if you spilled milk on your skin the EU says you'd have to wash it off? There's some kind of mistake in their assessment.

    Here's a research article that measured skin moisture before and after using a cream with cholecalciferol, and found favorable results: https://www.researchgate.net/publica...f_Xerotic_Skin . The cream applied had a daily dose of 4,000IU of cholecalciferol. This dose is the same amount recommended for daily dietary intake of Vitamin D for adults.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Busby View Post
    Yes johnabetts, the EU's position on the cosmetic use of cholecalciferol makes no sense to me either -- it's a common food additive in milk in many countries. Apparently if you spilled milk on your skin the EU says you'd have to wash it off? There's some kind of mistake in their assessment.

    Here's a research article that measured skin moisture before and after using a cream with cholecalciferol, and found favorable results: https://www.researchgate.net/publica...f_Xerotic_Skin . The cream applied had a daily dose of 4,000IU of cholecalciferol. This dose is the same amount recommended for daily dietary intake of Vitamin D for adults.
    Thanks Tom, I’m not saying it’s perfect but it’s the only thing I’ve found I can use.
    It’s the closest I’ve come.

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    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
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    Hi Ruby, actually I'm saying that topical Vitamin D is very effective -- it removes excess keratin. I've been using 4,000 IU topically for almost 3 months now, and the last bits of excess keratin are almost gone. My skin is softer and more flexible than it's ever been.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Busby View Post
    Hi Ruby, actually I'm saying that topical Vitamin D is very effective -- it removes excess keratin. I've been using 4,000 IU topically for almost 3 months now, and the last bits of excess keratin are almost gone. My skin is softer and more flexible than it's ever been.
    Yeah Iíve bought a few bottles as I think they are just trialling it at the moment. As you canít get it everywhere. Knowing my luck they will probably discontinue it Lol

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