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Thread: What does it mean if laser treatment doesn't work?

  1. #1
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    Default What does it mean if laser treatment doesn't work?

    Hi,

    Over the last 5 months I've had 4 sessions with a long-pulse (1064nm) laser and 1 with a copper bromide laser, but my skin is worse than when I started. During the long-pulse sessions the doctor says she can see the veins closing up, but once the post-treatment redness and swelling has gone down, they are definitely open and in business.

    Does this tell me anything about my condition or suggest anything else I should try? I don't have the papules / pustules, just the redness - my forehead and cheeks are pink with a darker patch on one side, but the skin just under my eyes is very pale.

    I have been prescribed tranexamic acid pills - no benefit so far but it's only been 3 weeks. There are some side effects so I wouldn't want to take them long-term anyway.

    BTW the principal doctor originally told me that you can repeat the long-pulse laser every 4 weeks but it doesn't matter if you leave it longer - you won't go backwards. Because I travel a lot, I had 2 gaps of about 8 weeks. When I saw him again and said the sessions didn't seem to be helping, he said that was because I wasn't coming regularly every 4 weeks.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sco View Post
    Hi,

    Over the last 5 months I've had 4 sessions with a long-pulse (1064nm) laser and 1 with a copper bromide laser, but my skin is worse than when I started. During the long-pulse sessions the doctor says she can see the veins closing up, but once the post-treatment redness and swelling has gone down, they are definitely open and in business.

    Does this tell me anything about my condition or suggest anything else I should try? I don't have the papules / pustules, just the redness - my forehead and cheeks are pink with a darker patch on one side, but the skin just under my eyes is very pale.

    I have been prescribed tranexamic acid pills - no benefit so far but it's only been 3 weeks. There are some side effects so I wouldn't want to take them long-term anyway.

    BTW the principal doctor originally told me that you can repeat the long-pulse laser every 4 weeks but it doesn't matter if you leave it longer - you won't go backwards. Because I travel a lot, I had 2 gaps of about 8 weeks. When I saw him again and said the sessions didn't seem to be helping, he said that was because I wasn't coming regularly every 4 weeks.
    Hello Sco
    ,
    Unfortunately laser and IPL do not work well for a lot of people with rosacea. Doctors spend a lot of money renting these expensive machines and then need to try to get payback for them. Tranexamic acid has no evidence for its use orally, only as a topical in rosacea.

    Look through the past threads in this section of the forum on lasers, and you'll find many many people who have had problems with these treatments. I think you should find a new doctor that specialises in treating rosacea with medications not laser or IPL. The types of medications that are most likely to help include clonidine, moxonodine, hydroxychloroquine, gabapentin, aspirin, mirtazapine. In fact, these medicines can even help with some of the disimprovement after the lasers. What country are you based in?
    Last edited by antwantsclear; 8th August 2019 at 06:37 AM.

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    I think it depends what rosacea you have. Bruising vbeam has helped my type 1 rosacea, clearing up redness and dampening burning for up to 6 months. It does come back, but I in my case, laser has worked a majority of the time. I think if you have an experienced practitioner, it can be very effective. I'd also argue that medication isn't the route either - these medications reek havoc on your gut microbiome, killing both good and bad bacteria. I think tackling the root cause of the inflmmation through good diet, loweing stress and general healthy practices are the best way to go about things, coupled with laser to reduce the superficial symptoms. Everyone is different however, so there is no blanket cure unfortunately.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Seb91 View Post
    I think it depends what rosacea you have. Bruising vbeam has helped my type 1 rosacea, clearing up redness and dampening burning for up to 6 months. It does come back, but I in my case, laser has worked a majority of the time. I think if you have an experienced practitioner, it can be very effective. I'd also argue that medication isn't the route either - these medications reek havoc on your gut microbiome, killing both good and bad bacteria. I think tackling the root cause of the inflmmation through good diet, loweing stress and general healthy practices are the best way to go about things, coupled with laser to reduce the superficial symptoms. Everyone is different however, so there is no blanket cure unfortunately.
    A good probiotic (symprove) is helpful for rosacea to manage the gut microbiome whether or not you take medications. I also use diet to manage my rosacea but it is not sufficient.

    There are really four ways to manage rosacea that are all worth using: medications; topical solutions; diet and supplements; psychological approaches (e.g. CBT or hypnosis).

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    595 nm is best for destroying veins without damaging other tissues. Longer wavelengths made me worse too. Is there a vbeam specialist near you? I'd look for a doctor who has done thousands of Vbeam treatments himself and owns his own equipment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrlhamcat2 View Post
    595 nm is best for destroying veins without damaging other tissues. Longer wavelengths made me worse too. Is there a vbeam specialist near you? I'd look for a doctor who has done thousands of Vbeam treatments himself and owns his own equipment.
    That's more or less the same as the copper bromide laser I tried (578nm). There was no noticeable effect but I only had one session so maybe I should give it another go. The fact that there is zero discomfort and zero downtime probably came into it as well - I just didn't feel it had done anything. The clinic I was going do doesn't have Vbeam. Although the treatment they recommended hasn't worked, I think the people there are pretty knowledgeable. I know of another clinic that does have Vbeam but have no idea about the staff there. Would you switch for the difference between copper bromide and Vbeam?

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    I'd probably try Vbeam, but only if you trust the practitioner. There are a lot of people out there who shouldn't be treating patients with lasers.

    I'd never heard of copper bromide lasers before, but if you felt nothing during the treatment I agree that's a sign of ineffectiveness. I got a couple Nd:YAG treatments where I didn't feel much, and I got worse or saw no improvement.

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    Btw, you might like topical tranexamic acid instead of the pills. Perhaps the doctor could make a solution for you, or prescribe ampoules for soaking? i would suggest asking if there is a risk of coagulation problems when taken topically.

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    Quote Originally Posted by antwantsclear View Post
    A good probiotic (symprove) is helpful for rosacea to manage the gut microbiome whether or not you take medications. I also use diet to manage my rosacea but it is not sufficient.

    There are really four ways to manage rosacea that are all worth using: medications; topical solutions; diet and supplements; psychological approaches (e.g. CBT or hypnosis).
    normally i would agree with the probiotis idea but i was taking symprove for 3 weeks and my symptoms got worse not better - my face was bright red and constantly flushed... i stopped taking symprove and switched to biolive instead ( different strains of probiotic ) and within 4 days my skin redness had mostly gone . strange huh ?

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    Symprove has had the best results from research studies compared to other probiotics that it works, but everyone's gut is different. Another I've found helpful, but less so, is Solgar Acidiophilus 40 plus.

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