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Thread: Significant Relief with Retinol Via Cod Liver Oil Gelcaps

  1. #1
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    Default Significant Relief with Retinol Via Cod Liver Oil Gelcaps

    (Please pardon if this is a duplicate of a post I attempted to make on July 26 but cannot find on the Forum.)

    Some years ago, I developed rosacea symptoms over the course of approximately 3 years. These became progressively worse until, in addition to the redness and emergence of spider veins, I also started to experience considerable discomfort/burning on my face.

    In search of relief, I started visiting rosacea forums such as this one. After a few months of viewing numerous forums posts, I stumbled across a single post on the Yahoo Rosacea forum where the writer had recommended dietary retinol. I subsequently learned that cod liver oil was a good source of dietary retinol and purchased a bottle of cod liver oil gelcaps for less than $5.

    I started taking a normal dose of 3 gelcaps and I experienced noticeable relief the first day; i.e., the burning was considerably reduced. Within a week or so, the burning had all but stopped. Occasionally, I would have some discomfort if I was exposed to irritants such as high pollen levels. Initially, these episodes of minor discomfort would occur on average every 2-3 weeks. Over the course of the subsequent months, they became much less frequent.

    The redness of my face diminished significantly in the weeks and months after I started taking cod liver oil, and most of the skin damage on my face was repaired in the years that followed. And there has never been any recurrence of the acute rosacea symptoms.

    My rosacea was probably the result of a deficiency of retinol, a form of vitamin A from animal sources. I don't know if dietary beta carotene (vitamin A from plant sources), would have provided the relief I experienced from cod liver oil/retinol. What I believed happened to me is that due to diet and lifestyle (note: I did not change my diet or lifestyle with the exception of incorporating the cod liver oil), I depleted my store of retinol/vitamin A, a fat-soluble vitamin, over the course of a number of years. As it became more and more depleted, my system revolted.

    This dietary tweak may only benefit a small number of rosacea sufferers (on possibly none). I offer it because having rosacea was a nightmare for me and this simple adjustment to my nutrition put an end to the nightmare. I regret not submitting this years ago, as I believe that it has the potential to help some of those afflicted, and I intend to submit it to other rosacea forums.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
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    Hi Cal, thanks for posting about Vitamin A and cod liver oil.

    What brand did you take, and what dose of each vitamin was in the product you took?

    Cod liver oil is also a good source of Vitamin D, and I wonder if anything in your experience or observations leads you to exclude the additional Vitamin D as an additional factor that treated your skin conditions? For example, perhaps your diet and lifestyle already did (or did not) provide sufficient Vitamin D.

    Vitamins D and A are very tricky to measure for ingestion, because it's hard to determine how much each person needs, because it appears that people absorb vitamins at widely different rates in their digestive systems. Hence, I prefer a topical dose, but that doesn't mean an ingested dose won't work too.

    I ask these questions because I use very low topical doses of Vitamin A and D, and for me, it was the recent addition of topical Vitamin D that resolved my excess keratin (extra layer of skin). For me, I'd added topical Vitamin A about 2 years ago, and while I saw some slow improvement, the recent addition of Vitamin D was a dramatic improvement, in about 30 days. That's why I'd like to know more about your experiences and observations.

    Thanks again for bringing this interesting topic to our attention.

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    I'm also very curious to hear more about this.

    Tom, how much vitamin D do you consume? I've been taking 5000 IU on and off for a few months. I find it so difficult to tell if a supplement is working though, i.e. if I'm taking enough, or if other conditions (such as weather or what mirror / light I'm looking at)
    are the culprit. It's very difficult to measure objectively..

  4. #4
    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
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    Currently, I don't consume any Vitamin D supplements -- I use Vitamin D topically in the lotions I make. Very little Vitamin D travels through the skin barrier, if any, as far as I have been able to determine. I'm using 20,000 IU of Vitamin D topically, full body, once per day. 20,000 IU of Vitamin D is a really tiny quantity, and expressed as a percent, it's 0.005%.

    The problem with Vitamin D supplements is mal-absorption in the gut -- some people absorb very little and some people absorb much more. The range is about a factor of 4, which I believe is why you see a range of recommended doses for taking oral supplements of Vitamin D, from 2,000 IU to 10,000 IU, daily.

    The mal-absorption problem is the reason why I decided to try the topical route, to see what would happen. Apparently, my skin was low on Vitamin D, and has been my whole life, concerning my excess keratin problem.

    I've taken Vitamin D supplements in the past, about 5 years ago, daily for 3 months, with no changes that I could determine. Also I eat well, with plenty of vegetables, milk, cheese, and salmon, and I'm outdoors a lot in the sun. There's no apparent reason for me to be deficient in Vitamin D.

    I've also been using Vitamin A topically, daily, full body, for about 2 years, at 0.05%. The Vitamin A is helpful to skin health, but not so much as Vitamin D, in my case at least. Or, there could be a synergy between Vitamins A and E, which seems likely.

    I'm curious about other's experiences.

  5. #5
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    Default Cod Liver Oil Dose

    Tom,

    The dose I started taking was 3 gelcaps and recommended amount was 2 or 3 gelcaps. This probably represented 100% or less of both Vitamin A and Vitamin D. I would not have started with a dosage larger than 100%, particularly for a supplement new to me. I cannot recall the brand but it was something that I probably got at Rite-Aid and it would not have been a big name.

    Currently, I take periodically (i.e., around weekly) 2 or 3 cod liver oil gelcaps of the Spring Valley brand that I get at Walmart. Each capsule contains 25% Vitamin A and 34% Vitamin D RDA (Recommended Daily Amount).

    On the matter of ingestion, although my knowledge here is fairly limited, I believe that retinol may offer an advantage over Vitamin A in the form of beta carotene. I recall seeing retinol referred to as "preformed Vitamin A" which you may want to research further.

    Cod liver oil cured me of my rosacea symptoms (not to sound hyperbolic). It may have been the Vitamin D as much or more than the Vitamin A. I just checked and see that Vitamin D is fat soluble as is Vitamin A. The progression of my rosacea symptoms, gradually over a period of 24-36 months, indicates that the vitamin or other factor was depleted over a period of time, and thus, more likely, fat soluble. Still, I lean toward Vitamin A (in the form of retinol, specifically) because I was getting plenty of sun, and assumably Vitamin D, in the years leading up to my rosacea symptoms.

    Although I state that I had rosacea symptoms, I am fairly certain that I had rosacea. I had gone to the doctor (general practitioner, not a specialist) prior to the symptoms becoming acute (i.e., significant discomfort) but nothing specific was diagnosed at that point. At the time (around 2000), I lived in California in a relative "backwater" on the Central Coast (near Morro Bay).

    I was lucky in that my rosacea was attributable to one primary cause, and the cure was a normal amount of a known nutritional element: retinol, cod liver oil, Vitamin A and/or Vitamin D, however you want to put it. Still, it took me research over the course of 3-4 months, and a bit of luck, to come across a resolution. I imagine that many of those with this condition have 2 or more contributing factors. To you I would say: (1) consider adding a modest amount of cod liver oil to your diet (mega-doses are not necessary, based on my experience), and (2) there's a good chance you too can figure this puzzle; i.e., a cure is possible and the damages to you skin can be repaired by your body, mostly or even completely.

    I welcome any other questions that any reader of this might have about my situation. I will mention that I am a 65 year old male in good health currently, and I was in my mid-40s at the height of my personal rosacea crisis. At that time I was otherwise in good health and quite physically active.

    Thanks for your question, Tom.

    Cal



    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Busby View Post
    Hi Cal, thanks for posting about Vitamin A and cod liver oil.

    What brand did you take, and what dose of each vitamin was in the product you took?

    Cod liver oil is also a good source of Vitamin D, and I wonder if anything in your experience or observations leads you to exclude the additional Vitamin D as an additional factor that treated your skin conditions? For example, perhaps your diet and lifestyle already did (or did not) provide sufficient Vitamin D.

    Vitamins D and A are very tricky to measure for ingestion, because it's hard to determine how much each person needs, because it appears that people absorb vitamins at widely different rates in their digestive systems. Hence, I prefer a topical dose, but that doesn't mean an ingested dose won't work too.

    I ask these questions because I use very low topical doses of Vitamin A and D, and for me, it was the recent addition of topical Vitamin D that resolved my excess keratin (extra layer of skin). For me, I'd added topical Vitamin A about 2 years ago, and while I saw some slow improvement, the recent addition of Vitamin D was a dramatic improvement, in about 30 days. That's why I'd like to know more about your experiences and observations.

    Thanks again for bringing this interesting topic to our attention.

  6. #6
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    Thank you so much, Cal. One of the challenges of those suffering here is that when some get better and fade off from the forum - we don't know what may have helped them. Thank you for your kindness and generosity in posting here and on other skin forums. It's very helpful and much appreciated. Best wishes!


    Quote Originally Posted by Cal Wilcox View Post
    Tom,

    The dose I started taking was 3 gelcaps and recommended amount was 2 or 3 gelcaps. This probably represented 100% or less of both Vitamin A and Vitamin D. I would not have started with a dosage larger than 100%, particularly for a supplement new to me. I cannot recall the brand but it was something that I probably got at Rite-Aid and it would not have been a big name.

    Currently, I take periodically (i.e., around weekly) 2 or 3 cod liver oil gelcaps of the Spring Valley brand that I get at Walmart. Each capsule contains 25% Vitamin A and 34% Vitamin D RDA (Recommended Daily Amount).

    On the matter of ingestion, although my knowledge here is fairly limited, I believe that retinol may offer an advantage over Vitamin A in the form of beta carotene. I recall seeing retinol referred to as "preformed Vitamin A" which you may want to research further.

    Cod liver oil cured me of my rosacea symptoms (not to sound hyperbolic). It may have been the Vitamin D as much or more than the Vitamin A. I just checked and see that Vitamin D is fat soluble as is Vitamin A. The progression of my rosacea symptoms, gradually over a period of 24-36 months, indicates that the vitamin or other factor was depleted over a period of time, and thus, more likely, fat soluble. Still, I lean toward Vitamin A (in the form of retinol, specifically) because I was getting plenty of sun, and assumably Vitamin D, in the years leading up to my rosacea symptoms.

    Although I state that I had rosacea symptoms, I am fairly certain that I had rosacea. I had gone to the doctor (general practitioner, not a specialist) prior to the symptoms becoming acute (i.e., significant discomfort) but nothing specific was diagnosed at that point. At the time (around 2000), I lived in California in a relative "backwater" on the Central Coast (near Morro Bay).

    I was lucky in that my rosacea was attributable to one primary cause, and the cure was a normal amount of a known nutritional element: retinol, cod liver oil, Vitamin A and/or Vitamin D, however you want to put it. Still, it took me research over the course of 3-4 months, and a bit of luck, to come across a resolution. I imagine that many of those with this condition have 2 or more contributing factors. To you I would say: (1) consider adding a modest amount of cod liver oil to your diet (mega-doses are not necessary, based on my experience), and (2) there's a good chance you too can figure this puzzle; i.e., a cure is possible and the damages to you skin can be repaired by your body, mostly or even completely.

    I welcome any other questions that any reader of this might have about my situation. I will mention that I am a 65 year old male in good health currently, and I was in my mid-40s at the height of my personal rosacea crisis. At that time I was otherwise in good health and quite physically active.

    Thanks for your question, Tom.

    Cal

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    I've experimented with Nordic Naturals Omega 3 capsules which are supposed to be a good quality source of fish oil. I noticed that they initially caused a flush within the few hours of taking them but the skin does appear less red and strengthened in general when I take them. Due to the flush, particularly if I took them daily, I think the best way for me to take them is maybe twice a week. Overall, I do think this brand helped me but not as a daily intake. It's often suggested it's the histamine in fish oil that causes the flush, and I do take an anti-histamine anyway as I find that helps with foods etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by antwantsclear View Post
    I've experimented with Nordic Naturals Omega 3 capsules which are supposed to be a good quality source of fish oil. I noticed that they initially caused a flush within the few hours of taking them but the skin does appear less red and strengthened in general when I take them. Due to the flush, particularly if I took them daily, I think the best way for me to take them is maybe twice a week. Overall, I do think this brand helped me but not as a daily intake. It's often suggested it's the histamine in fish oil that causes the flush, and I do take an anti-histamine anyway as I find that helps with foods etc.
    Yep me too I have theses in the cupboard I just take one if I havenít had fish for a few days .
    I find Iím alright with salmon but anything to greasy gives me spots.

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    This is an interesting thread, I thought it might be someone trying to advertise something because the OP only has two posts in the forum but he/she hasn't mentioned any brand, so it seems like it is a real success story. I would love to see if more people would say that it helped them after reading this.

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    I may try this.. because why not. Was the Vitamin A as Retinyl Palmitate? That is what this brand shows.. 42% DV, and includes Vitamin D (as Cholecalciferol) 500% DV.

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