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Thread: Weighing options from small to drastic: any advice?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chai View Post
    I would like to try moxonodine because I usevthe clonidine patch to avoid rebound but my skin has a terrible reaction to the patch (gets all red and itchy for awhile). But my gynecologist is the only one who prescribed clonidine and I havenít seen studies if moxonodine and hot flashes so Iím not sure who would give it to me. I guess I can ask the new derm. The ones I have seen before never want to prescribe oral antiflushing meds - one even said she never treats flushing because it just looks like a flattering blush. :P
    Moxnodine and clonidine are both alpha blockers and perform a similar function which would be the justification for your doctor to try moxonodine - Professor Chu dermatologist in London uses it quite a lot as you'll see on the forum, but I'm not aware of it being mentioned in the literature.

    You may need to find a dermatologist with a greater interest in rosacea flushing who is familiar with the range of medications available for treating this off licence. What country are you in? The other option is to find a sympathetic doctor who is willing to try different options with you although they don't have a lot of experience doing so as yet. There is a study of neurogenic rosacea you could show to such a doctor here suggesting various medicines which may work. This study suggests medications such as hydroxychloroquine and gabapentin:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3692271/

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by antwantsclear View Post
    Moxnodine and clonidine are both alpha blockers and perform a similar function which would be the justification for your doctor to try moxonodine - Professor Chu dermatologist in London uses it quite a lot as you'll see on the forum, but I'm not aware of it being mentioned in the literature.

    You may need to find a dermatologist with a greater interest in rosacea flushing who is familiar with the range of medications available for treating this off licence. What country are you in? The other option is to find a sympathetic doctor who is willing to try different options with you although they don't have a lot of experience doing so as yet. There is a study of neurogenic rosacea you could show to such a doctor here suggesting various medicines which may work. This study suggests medications such as hydroxychloroquine and gabapentin:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3692271/
    Thanks! Maybe this new derm will be more flexible in trying things. I also have a very sympathetic psychiatrist but not sure if these meds would be at all in her wheelhouse. I feel like she would prescribe them if I asked and it made any sense for her to do so. Iím in the U.S.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chai View Post
    Do you have any thoughts about doing PDL and then Botox shortly after, or whether it would be better to try Botox first by itself? I have mixed feelings- I could get rid of some underlying redness potentially with PDL but it might interfere with assessing the Botox.
    I don't really have a sense about this. It takes about a wk for me to heal from botox, although that does depend on the number of injections.

    I'm also in the US and btw moxonidine is not available here last I checked. I found an international pharm in Canada that said they could mail it, but didn't pursue it (it would have been out of pocket for me).
    Last edited by laser_cat; 18th June 2019 at 06:31 PM.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by laser_cat View Post
    I don't really have a sense about this. It takes about a wk for me to heal from botox, although that does depend on the number of injections.

    I'm also in the US and btw moxonidine is not available here last I checked. I found an international pharm in Canada that said they could mail it, but didn't pursue it (it would have been out of pocket for me).
    Ah, maybe thatís why no one has mentioned it to me. I assume you need a script for the Canadian pharmacy?

    Hmm, the doctor acted like it wasnít that long a healing process for Botox. I hope itís not a full week! Do you look noticeably weird for a week?

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chai View Post
    Ah, maybe thatís why no one has mentioned it to me. I assume you need a script for the Canadian pharmacy?

    Hmm, the doctor acted like it wasnít that long a healing process for Botox. I hope itís not a full week! Do you look noticeably weird for a week?
    I would have no problem covering with makeup after maybe 4 days (i just personally do not tend to wear makeup). When I have lots of little injections everywhere, downtime is the longest (1 wk). I think this tends to be more effective than fewer injections spaced out. Otherwise, the dilation (I'm guessing neurogenic inflammation) signal can easily spread into untreated areas all the same; eg when I tried just getting upper cheeks injected it did nothing although total downtime was ~3 days. Hopefully that makes sense .. I'm sure everyone is different though

    Yes I had a derm send an rx to an international pharmacy I found.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by laser_cat View Post
    I would have no problem covering with makeup after maybe 4 days (i just personally do not tend to wear makeup). When I have lots of little injections everywhere, downtime is the longest (1 wk). I think this tends to be more effective than fewer injections spaced out. Otherwise, the dilation (I'm guessing neurogenic inflammation) signal can easily spread into untreated areas all the same; eg when I tried just getting upper cheeks injected it did nothing although total downtime was ~3 days. Hopefully that makes sense .. I'm sure everyone is different though

    Yes I had a derm send an rx to an international pharmacy I found.
    Iím botoxed Wow, that was a lot of holes poked in my face. I look pretty scary right now but will see how next day or so goes. Any advice for recovery?

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chai View Post
    Iím botoxed Wow, that was a lot of holes poked in my face. I look pretty scary right now but will see how next day or so goes. Any advice for recovery?
    I just don't touch my face and take ibuprofen for the extra inflammation-induced pain I get. GOod luck!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chai View Post
    Iím botoxed Wow, that was a lot of holes poked in my face. I look pretty scary right now but will see how next day or so goes. Any advice for recovery?
    There is a cream called Skinceuticals Epidermal Repair which is designed for post procedure healing (e.g. after laser) and I've found it to help the healing after botox injections. It is helpful to ask the doctor to try to avoid very vascular areas but instead focus on areas that will block the blood flow to those areas. The most damaged veins (e.g. which may be on your nose commonly in rosacea) tend to be most prone to bruising/damage from the injections.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by antwantsclear View Post
    There is a cream called Skinceuticals Epidermal Repair which is designed for post procedure healing (e.g. after laser) and I've found it to help the healing after botox injections. It is helpful to ask the doctor to try to avoid very vascular areas but instead focus on areas that will block the blood flow to those areas. The most damaged veins (e.g. which may be on your nose commonly in rosacea) tend to be most prone to bruising/damage from the injections.
    Thanks! I will look for that cream, especially since I also plan to try PDL. So far so good- I can cover the few red dots left with light make up and thereís only one spot that looks like itís thinking about bruising but isnít really yet... I canít tell anything yet in terms of flushing.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chai View Post
    Thanks! I will look for that cream, especially since I also plan to try PDL. So far so good- I can cover the few red dots left with light make up and thereís only one spot that looks like itís thinking about bruising but isnít really yet... I canít tell anything yet in terms of flushing.
    PDL is much higher risk than botox treatments. I would see how you do with the botox treatments first. Also, there are several medications you can consider.

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