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Thread: Oral Ivermectin, getting diagnosed and a prescription

  1. #1
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    Default Oral Ivermectin, getting diagnosed and a prescription

    I've had some questions about taking Ivermectin. It is best to be under a doctors care when taking prescription drugs. You could be one of the few who has a serious allergic reaction to one of the drugs.

    The 2 week combined oral Ivermectin + oral Metronidazole treatment is to treat rosacea and ocular rosacea caused demodex skin mite infestations only. It is not going to help other types of rosacea not caused by demodex skin mites. It is best to be tested for demodex first, to make sure that this treatment could help.

    The Ivermectin is to be taken once a week only. 1 dose of Ivermectin per week during the two week treatment. Take one dose of Ivermectin on day one. Take the second dose of Ivermectin on day 8. Ivermectin should not be taken daily. Ivermectin should be taken on an empty stomach with a large glass of water at least 1 hour before a meal or 2 hours after a meal. The 250 mg oral Metronidazole is taken three times every day for the 2 week period.

    The Ivermectin dose is based on your body weight. 200 micro-grams Ivermectin per Kilogram of body weight. Your doctor can help compute the best, safe dose for you.

    If you are having trouble finding a doctor to test for demodex and prescribe the drugs, the following medical study paper may help. It was published in the May 2013 International Journal of Infectious Diseases - Vol. 17 Issue 5, Pages e343-e347. Try printing out a copy and take it to the doctors appointment with you to show the doctor. The combined 2 drug treatment was tested in a legitimate medical study with proper statistical validation on the test subjects results. It isn't just a kooky, untested treatment somebody posted on the Internet. If your dermatologist or GP/Family doctor will not help - are you having eye problems too? If you are having eye problems (ocular rosacea also known as blepharitis demodex) a knowledgeable opthalmologist may also be able to test and prescribe oral treatment. The younger doctors with more recent education may or may not be more helpful than older doctors who did not learn much about demodex in school.

    Here's the current link: https://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...0197121201315X

    If the link doesn't work try Googling the full paper name: "Evaluation of the efficacy of oral ivermectin in comparison with ivermectin–metronidazole combined therapy in the treatment of ocular and skin lesions of Demodex folliculorum"

    There are several methods for testing for demodex follicularum. All involve collecting a sample and looking at that sample under a microscope. The lab tech tries to count the number of demodex skin mites on the slide. If a larger than normal number of mites appear, then you have demodex follicularum infestation that needs to be treated. Demodex brevis live down in the glands and are harder to diagnose.

    Sample Collection Methods.
    1. Glue on a slide Method to collect a demodex sample:
    - They can put a special sticky glue on a microscope slide. They stick the slide on your face in an area that appears to have demodex activity. Leave the slide there briefly and pull it off.

    2. Skin scraping - they do a light skin scraping to collect the sample.

    3. Eye doctors may pull out some eyelashes to test for demodex.
    Last edited by ElaineA; 11th May 2019 at 01:22 AM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
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    Thanks for the post ElaineA, which I have posted links to your posts in the past that you have written since they are so intriguing. One point you may have missed is that a Russian study reports that scraping with a light microscope is not as reliable as using 'Confocal laser scanning in vivo microscopy'. You inspired me with your post to write one on Oral Ivermectin.
    Brady Barrows
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    Thanks for the post ElaineA, which I have posted links to your posts in the past that you have written since they are so intriguing. One point you may have missed is that a Russian study reports that scraping with a light microscope is not as reliable as using 'Confocal laser scanning in vivo microscopy'. You inspired me with your post to write one on Oral Ivermectin.
    Brady,

    Awesome post on Ivermectin! I learned even more about it from your post. Ivermectin is a great anti-parasitic drug. Oral Metronidazole is not only an antibiotic, its also anti-parasitic. While either drug has been used to treat demodex infestations, the combined treatment with the 2 drugs works even better.

    Oral Ivermectin and Oral Metronidazole have been around for many years. They have a good safety record. Both drugs are on the World List of Essential Medications. Both drugs are available as inexpensive generics.

    Being prescription medications, it is best to be under a doctor's care while taking the medications in case of allergic reactions to the drugs OR possible drug interactions with another medication that you are taking. While these side effects are relatively rare, they do happen. You should not drink alcohol while taking oral Metronidazole - and you should wait 72 hours after taking the last Oral Metronidazole tablet before consuming alcohol.

    Note: The Topical version of Metronidazole (i.e. Metro Gel ) is not effective against demodex. One study even dropped demodex mites into liquid 100% Metronidazole and it did not kill the demodex mites. But Oral Metronidazole is very effective against demodex. Researchers have speculated that the Oral Metronidazole changes something in the body's environment that kills the mites.

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    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
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    Elaine,

    Found this in googling oral ivermectin with reference to scabies which is pertinent to this thread:

    "When doctors in the USA prescribe ivermectin for scabies that is called an "off-label" use. This is not unusual and it is generally legal. Once a drug has been FDA approved for one disease or use, a doctor can prescribe it for any other use they choose to. Read more about "off-label use" in Wikipedia here. Wikipedia says "Off-label use is generally legal unless it violates specific ethical guidelines or safety regulations, but it does carry health risks and differences in legal liability." In other words, if the doctor thinks it is unethical to prescribe ivermectin or that he might get sued for prescribing it, he probably won't." In Depth Information On Ivermectin, MaximPulse, Green Dept
    Brady Barrows
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