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Thread: Who studies rosacea?

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    Default Who studies rosacea?

    This might be a stupid question, but I am wondering...who, if anyone, is currently studying rosacea (and trying to find new treatments for it)? I guess I'm just clueless as to how all that works. Any insight is welcome.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kfranke View Post
    This might be a stupid question, but I am wondering...who, if anyone, is currently studying rosacea (and trying to find new treatments for it)? I guess I'm just clueless as to how all that works. Any insight is welcome.
    It's definitely not a stupid question. I think as its seen as a cosmetic and therefore there's so little money put into scientific research, which is such a shame.

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    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
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    In some cases, the science of rosacea is currently being researched at a much higher level than I could ever discuss meaningfully. For example, Frank Powell, The Charles Institute of Dermatology, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland, probably is the most involved, long term, researcher and speaker. He is one of the authors of https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/...1111/bjd.16540 (2018), which discusses the use of live demodex (which is news to me) to test for an immune response – this is extremely complicated research, but it’s great that there are people who have the knowledge and resources to do all this.

    You may want to read research from the University of Maynooth, Kildare, Ireland, (Niamh O’Reilly and Noreen Lacey), and from North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (Megan S. Thoemmes) – they have done very high quality, intensive studies that are practical and easier to comprehend, at least for me. You could Google these names and find several interesting research papers, or O’Reilly’s PhD thesis.

    However, I find that articles by Fabienne M.N. Forton, Dermatology Clinic, Brussels, Belgium, are always the best because they’re more understandable, as he relies more on logical reasoning and observations, at least from my point of view. Here’s an example from 2018: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6001808/

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    The Plewig textbook is one of the few which discusses the variety of off licence medicines options that are used in practice by dermatologists with a specific interest in rosacea:
    https://www.amazon.co.uk/ACNE-ROSACE...s=books&sr=1-5

    Advanced Dermatologic Therapy II is good on a similar theme (there are two editions, and the older is pretty out of date now - 1987):
    https://www.amazon.com/Advanced-Derm.../dp/0721682588 - This book is recommended by Professor Frank Powell as the best advice on treating flushing conditions at least at the time he wrote his textbook 'Rosacea: Diagnosis and Management'
    https://www.amazon.com/Rosacea-Diagn...s&sr=1-1-fkmr0

    A lot of the value in these books is covering practical research based on case studies and significant experience of the authors, as there are few high quality clinical trials that have led to meaningful treatment options in rosacea, but quite a lot of practical experience about what works amongst a limited group of expert dermatologists and related clinical specialities such as neurology.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Busby View Post
    In some cases, the science of rosacea is currently being researched at a much higher level than I could ever discuss meaningfully. For example, Frank Powell, The Charles Institute of Dermatology, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland, probably is the most involved, long term, researcher and speaker. He is one of the authors of https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/...1111/bjd.16540 (2018), which discusses the use of live demodex (which is news to me) to test for an immune response – this is extremely complicated research, but it’s great that there are people who have the knowledge and resources to do all this.

    You may want to read research from the University of Maynooth, Kildare, Ireland, (Niamh O’Reilly and Noreen Lacey), and from North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (Megan S. Thoemmes) – they have done very high quality, intensive studies that are practical and easier to comprehend, at least for me. You could Google these names and find several interesting research papers, or O’Reilly’s PhD thesis.

    However, I find that articles by Fabienne M.N. Forton, Dermatology Clinic, Brussels, Belgium, are always the best because they’re more understandable, as he relies more on logical reasoning and observations, at least from my point of view. Here’s an example from 2018: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6001808/
    Wow. Thank you! That last one is VERY interesting. I get P&P's as part of my rosacea symptoms, and they undoubtedly contribute to the redness and vascular activity beneath the skin. Luckily, I can keep them mostly at bay with ZZ cream, but the thing is, I never really stop needing it; if I cease treatment, they start returning pretty quickly. And it's so odd how I never had this problem up until about 3 or 4 years ago. This was also when I started getting more redness and flushing than I'd ever had before. What triggered it? Is there a way to stop it? How does one go about eradicating this problem permanently? All questions worth considering. I really wish there was more research being done on rosacea, but it's good to know that at least some people out there give a ****.

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    I'd like to know how many people have committed suicide with rosacea. Because frankly I'm sick of this **** and everyday I feel like I'm getting closer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by aafdup View Post
    I'd like to know how many people have committed suicide with rosacea. Because frankly I'm sick of this **** and everyday I feel like I'm getting closer.
    Hello Aafdup

    Sorry to hear the rosacea is causing you so much frustration and/or depression. In terms of the link between psychology and rosacea, there has been some research done in Australia by a professor of clinical psychology showing that methods to help feel calmer can practically help with reducing flushing etc. Some people also find the anti-depressants medications that can help with flushing concurrently also help with anxiety and/or depression. Sometimes when rosacea makes you feel most down, it can be hardest to identify what practical steps could improve things.

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    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
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    As Tom Busby and antwantsclear have demonstrated, there are rosacea sufferers who begin thinking about rosacea rather seriously and have done investigative research and SHARED this information with fellow rosacea sufferers. When you get inside your own rosacea box and center all your anxiety and stress all by yourself this only contributes to sadness, frustration, stress and anxiety. If that is your case, then seeking help is a sign that you are not alone and can see outside your rosacea box you have created, which is a good thing. If you can step one more step and begin SHARING what you learn about rosacea that can help another rosacean who is also suffering, you are one step further in relieving some of of the damage done inside your rosacea box. There is more happiness is SHARING than in creating and climbing into your rosacea box. That is what RF is about. That is why you read this post. Now take that step yourself.
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    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Busby View Post
    In some cases, the science of rosacea is currently being researched at a much higher level than I could ever discuss meaningfully. For example, Frank Powell, The Charles Institute of Dermatology, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland, probably is the most involved, long term, researcher and speaker. He is one of the authors of https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/...1111/bjd.16540 (2018), which discusses the use of live demodex (which is news to me) to test for an immune response – this is extremely complicated research, but it’s great that there are people who have the knowledge and resources to do all this.

    You may want to read research from the University of Maynooth, Kildare, Ireland, (Niamh O’Reilly and Noreen Lacey), and from North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina (Megan S. Thoemmes) – they have done very high quality, intensive studies that are practical and easier to comprehend, at least for me. You could Google these names and find several interesting research papers, or O’Reilly’s PhD thesis.

    However, I find that articles by Fabienne M.N. Forton, Dermatology Clinic, Brussels, Belgium, are always the best because they’re more understandable, as he relies more on logical reasoning and observations, at least from my point of view. Here’s an example from 2018: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6001808/
    Tom,
    A recently released Russian Study has some new information on demodex. Fabienne M.N. Forton, MD is a female (maybe you mistyped?). Here is an interesting interview with Powell/Forton:
    https://youtu.be/WnnbwHWSHTQ
    Last edited by Brady Barrows; 26th April 2019 at 01:44 AM.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    Tom,
    A recently released Russian Study has some new information on demodex. Fabienne M.N. Forton, MD is a female (maybe you mistyped?). Here is an interesting interview with Powell/Forton:
    https://youtu.be/WnnbwHWSHTQ
    One of the issues that has not really been addressed in the literature on rosacea is killing mites on the scalp, which is a great site for them to live given they choose places where there are hair glands to live. Rosacea sufferers regularly say they use tea tree shampoos etc, as do I, to try to control mites on the scalp, but there is little research it seems into how to control scalp based mites. There is always a strong risk that if you only treat the scalp or you only treat the face the mites just migrate from one area to the other, ready to pounce back to the treated area when treatment stops. I think this is particularly relevant for the ears which are often directly in contact with the hair, and a popular site for mites to live in. Do you do anything to treat scalp based mites?

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