Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: I cured my Rosacea - TO Azelaic Acid, Cliradex and Microneedling

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Posts
    3

    Default I cured my Rosacea - TO Azelaic Acid, Cliradex and Microneedling

    First, I want to thank everyone who has shared their rosacea journey on this forum. When I found out I had rosacea, I spent countless hours reading through the discussions here and learned so much about what I was dealing with. I know rosacea is never "cured", just in remission, so I'm being a little clickbaity on my title but my rosacea truly is knocked back 90-95% and after everything I've learned from the forum, I feel compelled to pay it forward and thus, here's my first post.

    I wish I had a before picture but who wants to take a picture of yourself at your worst when you have no idea if you'll ever get better? So, I don't have a photo. But I had subtype 1, 2 and 4. I flared most strongly on my nose and a bit on my cheeks. PP throughout often with the dermodex "tracks" others have described. I've struggled with chalazions on my eyes and had to have several removed surgically in addition to losing lots of lashes.

    I compiled a huge spreadsheet- I enjoy type 2 fun ;) - of all the potential treatments I could find, their purpose, active ingredients, side affects and generic/DIY alternatives, if available.


    Here is what I found worked for me and in chronological order:


    Skincare:
    Cleanser- La Roche-Posay Toleriane Hydrating Gentle Cleanser
    Moisturizer- Cerave Moisturizing Cream or The Ordinary Natural Mosturizing Factors

    Other common gentle skincare products irritated my skin even Eucerin and Cetaphil. La Roche-Posay and Cerave was soothing and helped bring my pp under control. However, if I didn't wash and moisturize my face 2x/day, the pp would start to worsen again.


    Azelaic Acid:
    The Ordinary Azelaic Acid

    TO Azelaic Acid is 10% as opposed to prescription Finacea, which is 15%. The Ordinary version is also less than $8 as opposed to $300+ for the prescription for those of us without very good insurance. The Azelaic acid helped bring down my baseline red about 20% or so but didn't seem to help with flares or skin burning/discomfort.


    Cliradex:

    After reading the forums, it seemed probable that dermodex were a likely contributor to my pp and ocular rosacea. I started with cutting the Cliradex packets in half horizontally, which because of the way they are folded, gives three pieces. I started with just doing my lash line and it stung like a *&^%!. The discomfort has lessened over time and I now scrub my eyebrows, upper lash line, lower lash line with my eyes open and lower lid tugged down, and across my baseline red area of checks and nose. The improvement has been gradual but now I can miss washing/mosturizing my face without an immediate (12-24hr later) pp breakout and some lashes are growing back. I have not had a sty or chalazion since I've started the Cliradex.


    Microneedling:

    And now the controversial one. After having tackled the dermodex (cliradex) and finding a mild anti-inflammatory that worked for me (azelaic acid), I still had baseline redness and flaring from difficult to avoid situations. I have an allergy to the most common antibiotic family used for rosacea so cannot use the topical antibiotic and was concerned with the elevated baseline redness forum users reported from the topical blood flow restrictors. Next are the lasers and pseudo-lasers (aka IPL). I can't find the link on pubmed now (my fault for not saving it) but I saw a reliable study that found that 5% of laser/IPL patients had some kind of atrophic scarring as a result of their procedures. For a spot treatment of telangiectasias, the risk is acceptable to me but for a fuller face treatment on someone with already compromised skin? 1 in 20 is not great odds. So, I kept looking.

    I found a few mentions of microneedling in passing on the websites of cosmetic dermatologists and plastic surgeons as a component of their rosacea treatment plan and a few small but promising studies. I could not find mention of microneedling negatively affecting rosacea except in conjecture. Ie: rosacea is an inflammatory condition; microneedling purposely causes low levels of inflammation to trigger collagen production- ergo microneedling will aggravate rosacea. Unlike lasers and IPL, microneedling is very safe for the general public and generally understood to have a much lower rate of negative side effects or scarring.

    So, I decided to go for it despite not having very much good data. I was not flaring and did not have any active pp at the time of treatment. My face was red and felt tight and windburnt afterwards but it felt more like a sunburn from my younger years than a rosacea burn. The redness faded but the tightness remained for a few days. I peeled about four days later.

    I haven't flared since the treatment and my baseline redness has slowly been fading. Occasionally I'll be in a situation in which I would have flared in the past or my cheeks will tingle and I'll look in the mirror expecting redness and it isn't there. I would estimate that my baseline redness is 90-95% reduced right now. It has not affected the telangiectasias around my nose- rather the vessels are more obvious as they stand out compared to the paler skin. I could see myself doing a KTP laser treatment such as excel v on those in the future.

    It's been about six weeks since my treatment. Three treatments 6-8 weeks apart then yearly maintenance was recommended during my consultation but I'm not sure if I'll do all three. I'll definitely be going at least once more to see if that last 5-10% baseline redness can be taken away.

    So, how exactly did microneedling help my rosacea? Truthfully, I'm not sure. The reasoning behind avoiding it appears sound- why would you induce inflammation for someone suffering from an inflammatory condition? Maybe rosacea is more complicated then can be neatly defined as an inflammatory condition. Or maybe the body's healing process that microneedling induces is different from rosacea inflammation. Or that the induced new collagen did more good to help my rosacea skin than potential harm from the initial inflammatory healing response from the microneedling.

    I'm not trying to suggest that microneedling will work for everyone or that it was without risk. Or that my results have had to the time to demonstrate longevity. But given the lack of information about microneedling and rosacea, I believe my experience so far is a useful piece of anecdata.
    Last edited by southcarolinakelly; 18th April 2019 at 06:13 PM. Reason: grammar

  2. #2
    Senior Member Mistica's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    2,057

    Default

    It's great to hear another successful microneedling story. Thank you for sharing it.

    I too have been following posts on here and randomly on the internet. I've also seen the few studies that have been done.

    I have needled individual telangiectasia in the past with pleasing results. However, using even the slimmest sewing needle is far from ideal.
    I purchased a .5ml dermaroller last year and tentatively rolled a small area of my upper right cheek, which as expected, flushed really badly and even with my usual ice pack application I was not able to fully control the vasodilation. I had to wonder if any beneficial results I might have had were negated by the flushing.

    My upper right cheek is riddled with telangiectasia and it was my hope and intention to reduce them over time with needling.

    I tried another treatment about 3 weeks later, but this time I took an antihistamine a few hours earlier and it did reduce my post treatment flushing somewhat, making it more manageable.
    The only reason I did not continue with treatments is my life became so chaotic due to numerous factors, I wouldn't have had the free time to recover properly.
    I have still not escaped this chaos, but hope to in a few months time.

    That aside, I note that the people who have gained benefits reducing telangiectasia have used a 1m dermaroller.

    I am assuming you had your treatment done in a doctor's office or such.
    Do you happen to know the length of the needle used?

    Personally I wouldn't let anyone touch my face again, not after botched IPL's. Treating myself at home, very carefully, allows me full control.

    I've seen a number of patients who have developed track lines from rolling back and forth, so I follow a treatment plan I found on line where it is necessary to lift the roller from the skin even when going back and forth along the same path, so to speak.

    I just thought I would throw in my minor experience too, as I was once a really severe flusher and such treatments are usually considered counterproductive.
    If I ever get back to microneedling, I will certainly update on the results, or lack of them.
    Previous Numerous IPL.
    Supplements: Niacinamide, Vit K2, low D3, Moderate Dose Vit C, Iodine, Taurine, Magnesium. Very low dose B's. Low dose zinc (to correct deficiency).
    Skin Care: No Cleanser, ZZ cream mixed with Niacinamide gel 4% and LMW HA.

    Treating for gut dysbiosis under specialist care. (This is helping).
    Previous GAPS diet. Testing tolerance of resistant starch.
    Fermented Foods. 2 to 3 days per week, Intermittent fasting -16-18 hours.

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Thank you for sharing your experience Mistica!

    I had my treatment done in a medspa with a technician who has performed microneedling for 15 years. She used 0.5mm on my forehead and 1.0-1.25mm on cheeks, nose, chin and throat. She used a topical lidocaine before the treatment and various cooling gels (I'm unsure of the ingredients here) immediately afterwards. It certainly wasn't inexpensive though- $600 a session.

    She also used a dermapen instead of a roller, which I believe is standard practice for professional settings. I'm a fan of DIY as much as anyone but it seems like the direct up and down motion of a product like a dermapen was less likely to cause scarring than the longer punctures of a roller. I'm not sure if links are okay here? If so, this youtube video (abit made by the manufacturer of dermapen) showed where the "lines" that some people show from rollers come from.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29bWwHzl1ec

    I'm sorry to hear about your IPL damage. It seems to be pushed so much as a low risk, high reward procedure and it just isn't true. I had a consultation recently to talk about having a spot treatment with the Excel V laser to treat the telangiectasias around my nose and the nurse just threw in casually at the end of my consultation that they would do a single pass IPL at the end of the treatment session like it was a presumption. No, thank you!

  4. #4
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    12
    Country: UK

    Default

    Great positive post , its great to read success stories and long may it continue well done !!!

    Tbh I have never heard of microneedling I do now and will be looking into it

    Its the broken capillaries that grate on me , I go to my GP and he has to get up really close and tells me they don't look bad at all unless you have your nose pressed up against a mirror then they are hardly noticeable but what plays on my mind is I had Thermavein last year at a Doctor led clinic she took a picture of my cheeks magnified and told me in no uncertain terms that its going to take 10 + Thermavein treatments to sort my face out and that always sticks in my mind what I see in the mirror people tell me is not a reflection on how other people see me

    Again Thermavein marketed as low risk and the gold standard treatment and in my view it isn't , it didn't resolve any of my cap's and left me with hyperpigmentation that's still taking it time to fade now 9 months on from the procedure and could take between a year and two years to resolve if it does fully resolve anyway something that was sold to my it wouldn't cause but if somebody is jabbing you for 20 mins with a Microwave heated needle all over your face they surely its going to spark a reaction to your face most of the time if you have a inflammatory condition or not , its logical your face is thinking its under attack here and needs to respond - The clinic dismissed it as Rosacea and that's why I had the response I got with no response on the treatment of the cap's but again Thermavein is marketed as for Rosacea

    Electrolysis you start reading up on that and hyperpigmentation is common , shouldn't be used for Rosacea and can even cause a Rosacea reaction and even Sub derm , its basically the same procedure as Thermavein , Thermavein mention none of this and market it as the sure fire way with none of the risk to get cure your skin conditions

    I am looking at a holistic approach , Nobody can honestly say what causes broken cap's anymore then they can say what causes Rosacea and I honestly believe that your body can repair and heal itself from these conditions if its given the right conditions to do so , De stress , proper sleep pattern , the right nutrition , Sun screen etc and want to take charge of whatever I do to my face myself nobody knows my body or skin better then myself

    All I was doing with the Thermavein is sticking a finger in the dam till the next time and all the person doing the procedure was seeing pound signs , and the thought of IPL and laser scares me - I see IPL all over the internet marketed as low risk but when you come on forums and speak to real people there are elements there that really put me off - It seems because its cosmetic some are preying on my insecurity when I am at my most vulnerable .....


    Anyway sorry for going on and will follow your success story with great interest please keep us updated
    Last edited by SpookyMulder; 30th April 2019 at 06:21 PM.

  5. #5
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Posts
    5
    Country: United States

    Default

    Its not a cure until its gone. It can easily can come right back. I wouldn't be so happy until its completely gone for a few years.

  6. #6
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Posts
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by abc_123 View Post
    Its not a cure until its gone. It can easily can come right back. I wouldn't be so happy until its completely gone for a few years.
    Thanks for the positive thoughts and helpful suggestions, sunshine! ;)

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    243
    Country: UK

    Default

    I'm going to see my GP about Azelaic Acid soon.

    I expect they will recommend Finacea @ 15% AA, but The Ordinary brand of AA looks safer.

    Dr Bunting did a video on AA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdYKF4gemm4
    I'm recovering from Mirvaso-induced skin damage. Ask me about it if you are too.

    • Read about my PDL and IPL, with videos.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    826

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by darren1 View Post
    I'm going to see my GP about Azelaic Acid soon.

    I expect they will recommend Finacea @ 15% AA, but The Ordinary brand of AA looks safer.

    Dr Bunting did a video on AA: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HdYKF4gemm4
    I've tried the Ordinary brand of AA - thought it was quite helpful. Zhongzhou cream is more helpful to me. But the Ordinary AA is gentler than the 15% prescription AA and the formulation seems to work quite well. Also the Ordinary version doesn't cost much!

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    243
    Country: UK

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by antwantsclear View Post
    I've tried the Ordinary brand of AA - thought it was quite helpful. Zhongzhou cream is more helpful to me. But the Ordinary AA is gentler than the 15% prescription AA and the formulation seems to work quite well. Also the Ordinary version doesn't cost much!
    One can always buffer the 15% AA with moisteriser, and use every other day. That's what I'll be doing if I get Finacea.
    I'm recovering from Mirvaso-induced skin damage. Ask me about it if you are too.

    • Read about my PDL and IPL, with videos.

Similar Threads

  1. Azelaic acid
    By Carly1981 in forum General rosacea questions
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 21st March 2017, 11:02 PM
  2. Skin and Allergy - FDA approves azelaic acid foam for rosacea
    By RSS News Bot in forum Other News Feeds
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 28th September 2015, 04:00 AM
  3. Skin and Allergy - FDA approves azelaic acid foam for rosacea
    By RSS News Bot in forum Other News Feeds
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 11th August 2015, 05:20 PM
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 25th August 2014, 02:03 PM
  5. Topical Retinoids/Azelaic Acid/Salicylic Acid for Seb Derm?
    By flemmo in forum Similar and co-existing conditions
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 29th November 2007, 05:01 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •