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Thread: Question for Tom Busby about a comparison of Soolantra with Cetaphil

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    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
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    Default Question for Tom Busby about a comparison of Soolantra with Cetaphil

    Tom,
    Please post your two cents on a comparison of the inactive ingredients in Soolantra with Cetaphil. I have done some of the work for your expertise and would appreciate your insight and comments on this subject. This came up with a poster at Reddit who doesn't want to be quoted or referred to, but the poster basically said that the statement by Galderma found here:

    "Soolantra Cream combats inflammatory lesions of rosacea with a formulation designed for tolerability, utilizing CetaphilŪ Moisturizing Cream as the basis for the vehicle." Soolantra mechanism of action (MOA)

    is basically not true, that the basis for the vehicle in Cetaphil is Petrolatum, while Soolantra doesn't contain any Petrolatum and there are very few ingredients that each of these share. So I have made a detailed list of all the ingredients in a google sheet in alphabetical order for your thoughts on this subject and really appreciate your taking the time to offer any insight on this?
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    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
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    Hi Brady, I reworked your chart to show the differences and similarities (attached). Soolantra cream comparison.pdf

    It's difficult to make any broad statements about these products because first I'd want to know how much oil is used. I suspect that the amount of oil is very low, about 1-2%, in both products.

    My reasoning is first, that both products are thickened with polymers, so they're likely to feel similar, and in my opinion, slightly sticky or tacky. Therefore, you see the silicone ingredients, which are employed to reduce the sticky feel. Otherwise, there no reason to use silicones, and if you used more oil you could thicken the cream without using silicones at all. However, from a manufacturing point of view, oil is very expensive and polymers are very cheap, so polymer-plus-silicones is the solution to make a cheap base for the ivermection.

    The biggest problem with both these products is that silicone ingredients must be washed off with sulfate-surfactants, which are harsh in my opinion and a poor plan for rosacea because of the inflammation associated with it.

    Considering the extremely high price-point for Soolantra, a more gentle, aesthetic cream would be appropriate in my opinion.

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    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
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    Thanks Tom. Again I am impressed with your expertise on subjects like this. So basically, when Galderma says that Soolantra is "utilizing CetaphilŪ Moisturizing Cream as the basis for the vehicle" this is basically correct?

    PS
    I found the inactive ingredients in one brand of horse paste and would appreciate your comments.
    Last edited by Brady Barrows; 4th April 2019 at 06:45 AM.
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    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
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    Galderma probably says that it's using Cetaphil Cream because that's what its patents and clinical trials used as a base cream. There could be problems with using another base cream, from an FDA regulatory point of view, or from a patent point of view, but I'm not sure.

    There's no doubt that the actual base cream in Soolantra is not Cetaphil Cream, but on the other hand, it's roughly equivalent to the extent that they use a polymer-plus-emulsion cream.

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    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Busby View Post
    Galderma probably says that it's using Cetaphil Cream because that's what its patents and clinical trials used as a base cream. There could be problems with using another base cream, from an FDA regulatory point of view, or from a patent point of view, but I'm not sure.

    There's no doubt that the actual base cream in Soolantra is not Cetaphil Cream, but on the other hand, it's roughly equivalent to the extent that they use a polymer-plus-emulsion cream.
    Thanks for the clarification. I knew you would be the best source to answer such a question.
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    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
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    Tom,

    Just discovered another quandary and need your expert opinion on one particular inactive incredient in Soolantra, dimethicone. Someone at Reddit points out an article published in the Tropical Medical Health by Hermann Feldmeier that concludes, "Dimeticones are a family of compounds with a physical mode of action, targeting an Achilles heel of ectoparasites." I found another article that state dimethicone is a pediculocide. I did find this article that says "dimethicone lotion is not an insecticide and instead kills lice by suffocation," which may explain it.

    Dimeticone redirects to Polydimethylsiloxane
    . Dimethicone redirects to Polydimethylsiloxane.

    The Wikipedia article on Polydimethylsiloxane says it is used in medicine "in over-the-counter drugs as an antifoaming agent and carminative" with no mention of it being used as an insecticide or kills parasites.

    Do you think that dimethicone has anything to do with killing the mites?
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    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
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    Perhaps dimethicone is an old fashioned treatment for head lice, because like you, I can't find a reliable reference for using it as a miticide or arachnicide or insecticide. With lice, sometimes treatments are called any of these 3 terms. "Mite" is an old-fashioned English word, "arachnid" is the scientific term, and "insect" is just plain wrong, for referring to head lice or demodex.

    Watch out too for chemical names, as there are silicones that are oil soluble, water soluble, and not soluble in either oil or water.

    And, I can't find the recommended concentration for treating head lice with dimethicone -- if, ,for example, it's 15%, that would be far too messy to be cosmetically acceptable for trying it on the face.

    From my personal point of view in formulating, I like only water soluble silicones, because some of them wash out easily with water, but still provide some "slip" (ease of combing hair, or detangling). The other silicones just sit there on the skin or on the hair, and don't do anything useful from an aesthetic point of view.

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    Dimethicone doen't have any biocidal properties. The mode of action on the treatment of headlice is to prevent the adhesion of lice and the louse eggs on to the hair shaft.

    Headlice produce a strongly adhesive mucus secretion to stick their eggs (nits) to hair. Dimethicone prevents this adhesion and also interferes with the 'foothold' that the adult lice have on the scalp.

    Dimethicone is not immediate acting and requires several days for its effect to be apparent. It requires thorough combing of the hair after use to remove loosened lice and nits.

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    Dimethicone was also the main ingredient (first in list) in the Dermalogica Close Shave Oil, no longer available. I have no signs of rosacea in my shaving area - only on the ears and nose, where clearly I didn't apply the shaving oil. The point with a shaving oil is, assuming you shave every day or two, it is very easy to fully cover the area on a very regular basis.

    I also thought Soolantra cream had good moisturising properties when I used it. Unfortunately it seemed to stop working on killing mites
    after a while, and I've had longer term success with Zhongzhou cream.
    Last edited by antwantsclear; 10th April 2019 at 04:20 PM.

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    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
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    Thanks Tom, johnabetts, and antwantsclear for all your input on the dimethicone question.
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