Results 1 to 1 of 1

Thread: Good method to get Climbazole into the CeraVe Moisturizing Cream?

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Posts
    10
    Country: Austria

    Default Good method to get Climbazole into the CeraVe Moisturizing Cream?

    Hello! My Climbazole is beeing shipped to me and my goal is to mix it with CeraVe Moisturizing Cream.

    I found this information here in the forum by the user donmattus:
    Here are some simple ways of dissolving climbazole in a solvent:

    Climbazole dissolves 1 part climbazole in 3 parts isopropanol at 150F
    - some people have successfully added this then to off the shelf products like face washes and shampoos but they need to have sufficient surfactants in them for it to remain within the product otherwise it will precipitate and you won't be able to use it. If your face can take SLS then you could add it to things which have SLS in and it might work. If you have sensitive skin then the isopropanol will not be good for you and nor will SLS.
    - if you read Tom's research he gives a recipe for making your own lotion

    Climbazole dissolves in Benzyl alcohol at 1 part climbazole to 2 parts benzyl alcohol at 21C

    Climbazole dissolves in triethyl citrate (TEC) at 1 part climbazole to 3 parts TEC at 80C

    Climbazole dissolves in pentylene glycol at 1 part climbazole to 3 parts PG at 45C

    Climbazole also dissolves in MCT oil at 96.8C

    - You cannot add these to water as the climbazole will precipitate out - with the exception of PG if the PG is higher than 33%
    - these can be added to your own lotions - see Tom's papers
    - it may be possible to add them to off the shelf products if they have sufficient surfactants but I am not sure about that, some have tried and been successful, others not so much.

    You can add a climbazole / PG solution to your face if your skin can tolerate it - dissolve climbazole in PG and then add water so it is 33% PG

    You can add a climbazole / MCT oil solution to your face and that shouldn't be a problem to your skin but it does make you look oily and so it isn't an attractive look!
    Did you found a method that was working with CeraVe Moisturizing Cream or can you give me an advice?

    Edit: Okay I found this two posts from sejon:
    The problem with the dump-in method is that climbazole will start to clump up and precipitate once it comes in contact with water. So if you add the climbazole & alcohol mixture into the Hada Labo lotion, the climbazole will precipitate, rendering the product useless as a seb derm treatment (this is what happened with me -- but you're of course welcome to try for yourself, so long as it's kept in a transparent bottle so you can observe if precipitation occurs).

    Tom Busby is better positioned to answer your questions, but his workaround to this problem is to create an emulsion. In this approach, you'd pour the climbazole & alcohol in a heated oil (MCT oil or squalane) with an emulsifier and then add this to the water phase. The reason this process works is because the climbazole is trapped within little globules of oil and thereby protected from direct contact with the water. Making a lotion is complicated stuff, but you could make a simple emulsion in the form of a liquid, in which the ingredients are only the climbazole, isoproponal, oil, emulsifier, water, and a preservative. Its consistency wouldn't be much different from the Hada Labo lotion anyway.

    You can also try Decalact Liquid, as an alternative to climbazole, because it's soluble in oil, and there are no precipitation issues to worry about, so it's a lot more user-friendly especially for beginners. It just doesn't get enough mention on this board as climbazole does, but since you're in Europe you can get it quite easily.
    With any product that contains water (all lotions, for instance, including Cerave PM), dumping the isopropanol w/ climbazole into it will result in the climbazole precipitating (i.e. the alcohol is no longer able to keep it dissolved because climbazole has a strong tendency to clump up in the presence of water). The dump-in method for climbazole is generally a bad idea -- even Tom Busby, who pioneered the method, says so, which is why he started to compound his own lotion from scratch.

    The only success story I had with dumpling climbazole was into this salicylic acid toner product, and that's because it contains no water. The only ingredients are denatured alcohol, propylene glycol, glycerin, and salicylic acid. I dumped the isopropanol w/ climbazole into it and kept it in a transparent bottle -- even after several months, no visible precipitation occurred. The downside was the product's high alcohol content, which would be problematic for a lot of people especially with sensitive skin, but in my experience the drying effect of the alcohol was counteracted by the inclusion of glycerin.

    Another problem with dumping into commercial lotions, like Cerave PM, is that you're unable to see if precipitation occurs, because the lotion isn't transparent. Basically, the only way you'd be able to tell if it was a success is if you notice any effect it has on the dermatitis, which would take weeks of applying it with just blind hope.

    If you want a water-based product that keeps the climbazole dissolved, you'd have to commit to making your own emulsion from scratch -- there aren't really any shortcuts.
    Has maybe someone found a solution to this problem yet? Or is it simply impossible to properly add Climbazole in a product with water and/or without surfactants like SLS?

    I just looked over the recipe at the "Review of OTC Treatments for Malassezia skin conditions-final-3.pdf" from Tom Busby on pages 9/10/11 . And I would also go this route, when the only other way is to use pure MCT Oil. MCT Oil for me is okay, but not in really high concentrations ...

    I think i would prefer something not soo so oily, more watery, spray it on my face, let it dry/sit, and then just use / go over with the CeraVe cream. Do you think that would work?

    Maybe something like sejon mentioned:
    Making a lotion is complicated stuff, but you could make a simple emulsion in the form of a liquid, in which the ingredients are only the climbazole, isoproponal, oil, emulsifier, water, and a preservative. Its consistency wouldn't be much different from the Hada Labo lotion anyway.
    Can someone help? Which emulsifier would make the most sense? Does maybe someone have a link to a good tutorial series where they go over the basic I would need to be able to do it myself?
    Last edited by spiritussancti; 4th March 2019 at 01:58 AM.

Similar Threads

  1. Climbazole dump-in method questions
    By aahh in forum Similar and co-existing conditions
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 2nd August 2018, 05:32 PM
  2. Moisturizing cream
    By msullivan-10 in forum Topical and oral products (non-prescription)
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 14th February 2016, 04:05 AM
  3. Cerave Moisturing Cream - Any good?
    By joeldog25 in forum Topical and oral products (non-prescription)
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 24th July 2009, 07:52 PM
  4. CeraVe Moisturizing Lotion
    By polster in forum Topical and oral products (non-prescription)
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 8th August 2006, 12:59 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •