PRP stands for platelet-rich plasma. Every patient potentially makes their own platelet-rich plasma because his or her blood is used for the procedure.

A blood draw is taken and spun down to concentrate the platelets in the blood. According to one of the top stem cell treatment researchers, most PRP preparations are three to five times as concentrated as the normal blood platelet concentration.

PRP is full of growth factors that cause stem cells to grow rapidly. These growth factors include IGF, VEGF, TGF-beta, PDGF-bb and a lot more. The purpose of these growth factors is to make the bodyís own stem cells work harder and faster.

PRP is full of growth factors that cause stem cells to grow rapidly. These growth factors include IGF, VEGF, TGF-beta, PDGF-bb and a lot more. The purpose of these growth factors is to make the bodyís own stem cells work harder and faster.

PRP has been used for almost a few decades now in dentistry to help dental implants heal, in orthopedics to heal tendons or bones that have been fractured, and in plastic surgery/cosmetic surgery. You can read more about PRP here.

However, the question remains Ö will PRP help improve rosacea?


Before this question is answered, you should know that there is a correlation between rosacea and a stem cell deficiency. Doctors at the Associated Eye Care Clinic in Minnesota reviewed all their records from a 9-year period to find out who had a stem cell deficiency and who didnít.

They found that patients who had the deficiency had been receiving topical medications and rosacea or some other external eye disease such as herpes of the eye, pink eye, edema of the cornea or other eye diseases. They all had also received eye surgery, usually for cataracts. One of the consequences was scarring of the cornea.

Now the doctors who submitted the study to the medical journal concluded that surgical trauma to the limbal stem cells probably made these stem cells more prone to external disease influences and toxicity after long-term topical medications.

The reason why this is brought up here is because this study sheds light on why stem cell treatments or PRP may work or not work in those with rosacea. According to the doctors of this study, thereís a stem cell deficiency in one area of the eye that then spread centrally to the rest of the body, which was seen in rosacea patients.

Thus, if someone with rosacea is getting PRP, which is void of stem cells, the treatment may not work. This patient may need actual stem cells, not just the growth factors that are found in PRP.

People with all forms of acne have scars to deal with from the acne. With rosacea, itís double trouble because there may also be redness that draws attention to the skin condition. Several medical studies have been done on the topic of PRP that have looked at the result of PRP on acne scars.

In the first Chinese study, doctors concluded that PRP is an ideal treatment for facial acne scars with minimal side effects when combined with regeneration technology. Unfortunately we donít know what regeneration technology techniques that the researchers are referring to, but can assume it was most likely some of the different laser techniques that resurface the skin.

The treatment was effective for 91% of the 25 patients and the side effects were minimal. There was no problem with hyperpigmentation, depigmentation or worsening of the acne scars over a six-month period of time. PRP with the regeneration technology was well tolerated and safe and effective.