Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: How to prevent overheating at night?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Indiana, USA
    Posts
    176
    Country: United States

    Default How to prevent overheating at night?

    Hi all,

    Quick question to anyone who may have advice. These days, the main cause of my flushing is overheating while sleeping. It doesn't happen every night, but when it does, the blood vessels in my face become extremely dilated, and needless to say, this depresses me, as I've been improving so much with my last laser treatment. I don't want to erase the progress I've made with nightly flushing that could (probably) be prevented.

    So...any tips for keeping cool at night?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    678

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kfranke View Post
    Hi all,

    Quick question to anyone who may have advice. These days, the main cause of my flushing is overheating while sleeping. It doesn't happen every night, but when it does, the blood vessels in my face become extremely dilated, and needless to say, this depresses me, as I've been improving so much with my last laser treatment. I don't want to erase the progress I've made with nightly flushing that could (probably) be prevented.

    So...any tips for keeping cool at night?
    The most immediate and easiest thing you can do is to try a cooling pillow, e.g. a Chillmax JML pillow. The best brand of these, Chillow, has unfortunately gone out of business. These do make your pillow a bit cooler. Various cooling pillow are available on Amazon - I always sleep with one, as they are quite helpful.

    A more expensive and radical option is installing air conditioning in the room.

    Medications that reduce flushing can be helpful if taken before bedtime, such as clonidine or moxonodine, mirtazapine, hydroxychloroquine, pregabalin or gabapentin.

    Demodex mites are most active at night time when it is dark which is one reason why you might be prone to flushing then. You can kill the mites using tea tree oil shampoos and diluted tea tree oil on your face (e.g. dilute with almond oil or grapeseed oil), applying these just before bedtime. Soolantra cream can also kill the mites, as it contains ivermectin, which again it is recommended you apply just before bedtime.

    Another reason is carbohydrate fuelled meals which increase your propensity to flush as the day goes by (e.g. a heavy carbohydrate based meal just before you go to bed is likely to result in flushing in bed as your blood pressure will be raised at bedtime). The British Heart Foundation has said potatoes, for instance, can significantly increase blood pressure. Gluten based carbohydrates such as pasta and bread are worse than potatoes for flushing in my experience. So reducing fast burning sugar/carbohydrate based products can help. Sweet potatoes and squash cause less flushing for me than potatoes or pasta.

  3. #3
    Senior Member laser_cat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    526
    Country: United States

    Default

    Mirtazapine 22.5 mg lets me sleep through the night and lessens the need to elevate my head (lessens flushing overnight). 15 mg would be even better for sleeping I think but 22.5 mg lets me wake up in the morning :p I've been on it over a yr now and it's still working very well.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Indiana, USA
    Posts
    176
    Country: United States

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by antwantsclear View Post
    The most immediate and easiest thing you can do is to try a cooling pillow, e.g. a Chillmax JML pillow. The best brand of these, Chillow, has unfortunately gone out of business. These do make your pillow a bit cooler. Various cooling pillow are available on Amazon - I always sleep with one, as they are quite helpful.

    A more expensive and radical option is installing air conditioning in the room.

    Medications that reduce flushing can be helpful if taken before bedtime, such as clonidine or moxonodine, mirtazapine, hydroxychloroquine, pregabalin or gabapentin.

    Demodex mites are most active at night time when it is dark which is one reason why you might be prone to flushing then. You can kill the mites using tea tree oil shampoos and diluted tea tree oil on your face (e.g. dilute with almond oil or grapeseed oil), applying these just before bedtime. Soolantra cream can also kill the mites, as it contains ivermectin, which again it is recommended you apply just before bedtime.

    Another reason is carbohydrate fuelled meals which increase your propensity to flush as the day goes by (e.g. a heavy carbohydrate based meal just before you go to bed is likely to result in flushing in bed as your blood pressure will be raised at bedtime). The British Heart Foundation has said potatoes, for instance, can significantly increase blood pressure. Gluten based carbohydrates such as pasta and bread are worse than potatoes for flushing in my experience. So reducing fast burning sugar/carbohydrate based products can help. Sweet potatoes and squash cause less flushing for me than potatoes or pasta.
    Thank you for the tips. I've been shopping around for Chillows, but I don't know which brand to invest in...there seem to be mixed reviews for all of them. Any recommendations?

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Indiana, USA
    Posts
    176
    Country: United States

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by laser_cat View Post
    Mirtazapine 22.5 mg lets me sleep through the night and lessens the need to elevate my head (lessens flushing overnight). 15 mg would be even better for sleeping I think but 22.5 mg lets me wake up in the morning :p I've been on it over a yr now and it's still working very well.
    Thank you for the advice. Flushing medications are something I haven't ever really looked into. How, exactly, would you recommend I go about getting something like that prescribed to me in the future? I've never had a dermatologist suggest such a thing before, and I've seen a lot of them in the past few years. It seems a less common approach here in the US. Should I go to my regular family physician, or ask a dermatologist?

    Also, does Mirtazapine have any major side effects? Has it ever caused rebound flushing in your experience? For me that would be an unacceptable side effect.

  6. #6
    Senior Member laser_cat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Posts
    526
    Country: United States

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kfranke View Post
    Thank you for the advice. Flushing medications are something I haven't ever really looked into. How, exactly, would you recommend I go about getting something like that prescribed to me in the future? I've never had a dermatologist suggest such a thing before, and I've seen a lot of them in the past few years. It seems a less common approach here in the US. Should I go to my regular family physician, or ask a dermatologist?

    Also, does Mirtazapine have any major side effects? Has it ever caused rebound flushing in your experience? For me that would be an unacceptable side effect.
    No rebound flushing.

    Side effects - tiredness, appetite increase (not really increase, but less satiety after eating ... due to its antihistamine effects). both of these are more pronounced at lower doses (and in the beginning). As you move up in dose eg 15 mg -> 45 mg, the norepinephrine effects are more noticeable, which means it is more activating/stimulating. The norepinephrine might facilitate some vasoconstriction / blood vessel stability as well. I found 22.5 mg to work best for me (I would go up higher for the mood benefits etc but going up higher doesn't help me as well for sleep).

    I think any doc could likely rx. Maybe PCP would be best bet. I think my psychiatrist rx'es mine now but my PCP used to.

    Out of all the flushing meds, I think this one would be the best for helping someone get through the night "unflushed". Good luck

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    678

    Default

    Hi Kfranke

    It does seem that quite a lot of the chilling pillow companies go in and out of business. You may find a Chillow available on Ebay, though this company is no longer trading. Otherwise you could purchase a couple of different ones from Amazon and see which you think works best - that's what I did.
    Last edited by antwantsclear; 3rd January 2019 at 11:24 PM.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 17th September 2015, 09:53 PM
  2. Do you know how to prevent blushing?
    By Adamm in forum Similar and co-existing conditions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 22nd March 2012, 08:35 PM
  3. Overheating with exercise (hypothalamus)
    By t3dstrik3r in forum General rosacea questions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 23rd February 2012, 12:27 PM
  4. What happens during the NIGHT?
    By zzguy in forum General rosacea questions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 7th March 2008, 08:38 AM
  5. Please help me prevent Rosacea
    By LittleMiss in forum Newbie questions / Introduction
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 5th March 2007, 08:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •