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Thread: Benzyl Benzoate is Working Where All Else Has Failed

  1. #91
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    Very interesting, Sejon! Thank you for sharing!

    May I ask, when you say you mix the flowers of sulphur (btw, do you just buy it off Amazon?) and that it blends easily, do you just add the powder to the cream and thats it?
    And also, hope you heal up fast and are able to live a normal life despite all the wounds
    Last edited by rednessator; 8th April 2019 at 12:23 PM.

  2. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by sejon View Post

    My reaction when using ZZ cream was nowhere near as severe, nor did I develop any cysts or nodules, which, as previously mentioned, leads me to believe that this treatment is killing more deep-seated demodex that the ZZ cream couldn't.
    I remember thinking the same when I first stated to use Nu-Stock. I recall Nu-Stock being the most effective topical I used, which was likely down to its higher sulphur content. I stopped because of the hassle and ease at which it can be taken too far and dry out the skin. Maybe I should consider using Nu-Stock again.

    I also had the theory that precipitated sulphur would be best, but sublimed sulphur would suffice if used at a higher percentage. This would be interesting to test.


    Looking back through this thread this is what I wrote:

    "I think I may have figured out why Nu-Stock is so effective. Whenever you see sulphur mentioned in the literature for any kind of skin condition, the precipitated form is used. OTC options only seem to use sublimed sulphur. The precipitated form has a finer particle size so to get a similar effect sublimed sulphur at a higher percentage must be used. This makes sense given that the best results were only seen in people who used Nu-Stock at a higher percentage."

    "Maybe the harsh treatment of Nu-Stock is required to target D. brevis immediately and effectively. As mentioned, precipitated sulfur can better penetrate skin to the sebaceous glands where D. brevis live, but so can sublimed sulphur at a higher concentration but only through its aggressive use. So I don't necessarily think daily treatment with something gentler is required in this case, although it can't hurt. Maybe in some very long-term cases of demodex like what Dave is experiencing, Soolantra is very poor at penetrating deeper into the skin. This requires a much longer treatment process and might explain why the clearance rates almost double for Soolantra when used for a full year."

    "Anyway, Nu-Stock seems to be highly, highly effective. The theory goes that sulphur at 10% and under is enough to just disturb the mites and not truly eradicate them and kill them on contact. It also helps that Nu-Stock has pine oil, and this treatment has the addition of another demodex killer in TTO too. This is evidenced by reports of people only having results when they started to become more aggressive with Nu-Stock by using it at a 50/50 mix."

  3. #93
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    May I ask, when you say you mix the flowers of sulphur (btw, do you just buy it off Amazon?) and that it blends easily, do you just add the powder to the cream and thats it?
    I bought flowers of sulphur on eBay, as well as a few 30ml jars. I dispensed some of the Cerave Cream into the jar, and mixed the sublimed sulphur into it by stirring. The sulphur doesn't dissolve in the cream nearly as easily as it did in the De La Cruz ointment, but still good enough. The result is a cream that is more akin to ZZ cream, in the sense that it partially absorbs into the skin and leaves a residue, unless you use only a minimal amount. By contrast, mixing the De La Cruz ointment (even with a lot of sulphur added to it) with the Cerave Cream, and applying that, leaves almost no residue and seems to completely absorb after a while.
    Last edited by sejon; 8th April 2019 at 03:07 PM.

  4. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick_1 View Post
    I remember thinking the same when I first stated to use Nu-Stock. I recall Nu-Stock being the most effective topical I used, which was likely down to its higher sulphur content. I stopped because of the hassle and ease at which it can be taken too far and dry out the skin. Maybe I should consider using Nu-Stock again.

    I also had the theory that precipitated sulphur would be best, but sublimed sulphur would suffice if used at a higher percentage. This would be interesting to test.
    I'd suggest experimenting with sulphur powder instead of Nu-stock, since the mineral oil in Nu-stock is a very poor solvent for the sulphur, and doesn't absorb at all because its molecules are too large (like petrolatum), which is why it's so messy to work with. Glycols (polyethylene glycol, glycerine, propylene glycol) are much better solvents for sublimed sulphur than oils. Not sure about precipitated sulphur though, but sublimed sulphur is a lot easier to find. On that note, I'm also not sure what kind of sulphur is used in Nu-stock since the product's website and MSDS data sheet don't specify.

  5. #95
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    It's a shame precipitated sulphur is so hard to find. I can only find it with a prescription or for £30 for 500g. I'm willing to pay that amount but a £20 fee is added if the order total is below a certain amount. Even then, I don't think it can be purchased by individuals.

    I think you said that you don't always apply topicals daily. As brevis rarely come up to the surface, though have to at some point, do you think that is why you are now experiencing such a bad die-off? You might have missed them without daily treatment. In theory, with enough time and ensuring that daily treatment is maintained, brevis will eventually be killed off too. Otherwise, more extreme measures must be taken.

    I wonder if it's not so much to do with penetrating the skin more deeply as it is with just removing layers of skin until the mite/yeast etc. can be found. Maybe it's a bit of both. As an example, when at one point I overdid the Hidiscrub on my back I experienced excessive dryness and peeling which (at least temporarily) got rid of my issue.

  6. #96
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    I apply the sulphur every other night, occasionally taking breaks of a couple nights, so it rounds off to about 3 times a week. For the first week I applied every night, but the reaction was much more sudden and intense than I was expecting, and the extreme dryness had me concerned that the high amount of sulphur was directly drying out my skin. Fortunately this proved to not be the case, since the dryness subsided despite continued treatment, so I'm guessing it was just part of the initial inflammatory reaction.

    I'd be more willing to try it nightly since most of the inflammation has died down by this point, but seeing as my skin is gradually improving I don't know if it's really necessary -- what I think is much more important is that I'm consistent about the treatment in the long term (which is what I failed to do last time, as I didn't keep up with it after finishing my tub of ZZ cream).

    Judging from all the nodules/cysts, I have reason to believe that I've been killing brevis (or more deep-seated folliculorum) regardless of whether or not they come to the surface. Though there's no way to know that for sure -- I just can't fathom why else I'd be getting them all of a sudden.

    If I'm not clear or mostly clear by the end of this month (which would make 8 weeks of treatment), I'll start to worry, since that wouldn't adhere to the typical recovery timeline. But considering I'm in a much better state now as compared to week 2 of treatment, I'm still optimistic that the improvement will continue.

  7. #97
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    I tried Googling this, but what is the difference between precipitated sulphur and for example flowers of sulphur? I found 1kg of flowers of sulphur on eBay for 16 USD, which was very cheap

  8. #98
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    "Precipitated sulphur is made by boiling sulphur and lime together in water, filtering, and then precipitating with muriatic acid. Certain chemical reactions between the lime and sulphur, through which both are dissolved, are inverted by the muriatic acid, which reacts with the ingredients of the lime so as to form chloride of calcium and water, while the sulphur is separated and deposited, carrying with it a portion of loosely combined water." - source

    "Being in a finer state of division than sublimed sulphur, it looks almost white, with only a slight tinge of yellow. Otherwise its characters are the same." - source

    As I understand it, precipitated sulphur has the same therapeutic effects as sublimed sulphur except it's a finer powder, which translates it into being more absorbable, and thus probably a lesser amount is required. So it'd be much easier to mix with creams, and certainly the preferable choice, but sublimed sulphur is much cheaper and more readily available.

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    Thank you very much! Appreciate it! I wonder, does it smell as bad as flowers of sulphur?

  10. #100
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    "Precipitated sulphur is in the form of powder or pulverulent lumps, of a whitish colour, soft to the touch, not gritty between the teeth like the flowers, of a feeble odour, and a slight sulphurous taste."

    I'm guessing the smell is fainter than sublimed sulphur. Then again, I don't find sublimed sulphur to have a particularly strong smell either. The most strongly sulphuric smell I've encountered with a product is Nu-stock. I find its stench overpowering, although I don't know why it smells that strongly when sublimed sulphur's scent is so subtle in comparison, and Nu-stock even includes a fragrant oil (pine oil) in an attempt to hide it.

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