Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 46

Thread: What foods are triggering you the most?

  1. #11
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    9
    Country: United States

    Default

    I think more often its alcohol, some fruits(like oranges), eggs, and milk products. Some people have a really bad reaction for it

  2. #12
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    29

    Default

    I find if I drink beer with a lot of yeast in it like a wheat beer, it sets my skin off. In general if I consume anything with too much yeast. My face goes bright red and itches like crazy. It is a shame as I really do love wheat beer. Spicy food also makes me flush badly and causes outbreaks as well.

  3. #13
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    355
    Country: UK

    Default

    Last year I drank hot bone broth that was swimming with fat. A mug if it.

    Ten minutes later my face was badly flushed and I knew that the fat had irritated my gut. The blushing was really hot and very angry-looking.

    I had recently had PDL at that point and this flush ended up causing permanent patches of redness on my face, on the areas that the laser had missed.

    I now know that saturated fat is not good for my stomach, at least not if it's empty!
    I'm recovering from Mirvaso-induced skin damage. Ask me about it if you are too.



    T-Shirt: "Laser skin treatment. That's what it is if you're wondering. Yes, it hurt."

  4. #14
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    3
    Country: United States

    Default

    these are chips .. I can't stop eating them, as soon as I try to clean my skin and not eat them for at least a week, I start to want them all the time. it pisses me off

  5. #15
    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Centre, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    5,400

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AJensen89 View Post
    these are chips .. I can't stop eating them, as soon as I try to clean my skin and not eat them for at least a week, I start to want them all the time. it pisses me off
    I hear you. Chips are my weakness too. But every so often, on occasion, vanilla ice cream.
    Brady Barrows
    Blog - Join the RRDi



  6. #16
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Posts
    5
    Country: England

    Default exclude certain foods is the key

    I would say sugar, gluten, dairy and nuts have to pass for a while or for good. Check the list out here, it took me a year but worked wonders: https://www.mynaturalheal.com/rosacea/
    All the best,

  7. #17
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    29

    Default

    I've been drinking and my disgusting skin at this moment has caused me to reflect on my Rosacea.

    I've been battling Rosacea and Seborrheic Dermatitis for 20 years now thanks to taking the acne drug Accutane at age 18 and thus ruining my life.

    I've always noticed how important diet is to my skin. Eating lasagna every day? Very bad. Eating lettuce wrapped burgers and mashed potatoes? Good. Yet still I often disobey these food rules and maybe my hope here is that by writing this I will be able to get back on track.

    Even though my problems are Accutane-induced, I believe they share a common pathway with people who ended up with this for other reasons. I'll skip over the long winded, sulfur metabolism-related reasons I think Accutane gave me gut dysbiosis, but I believe it's dysbiosis that results in Rosacea. At least my Rosacea, and perhaps the Rosacea of many others.

    I've spent about 15 years trawling through pubmed and other places trying to fix my problems and the one study that's been the most helpful to me is in regards to diet and the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor. Not sure, but the study may have vanished from the internet. Luckily I saved it. I've pasted it below:

    Role that diet may play in the etiology of rosacea

    The clue to the role that diet may play in the etiology of rosacea comes from the observation that pharmaceutical eradication of the bacteria, Helicobacter pylori, improves or ameliorates symptoms in rosacea patients (1-3). H. pylori is the bacteria that causes gastric and duodenal ulcers. Although the physiological basis for the curative effect of H. pylori eradication is unknown, we believe that a mechanism in the human gut, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) likely plays a crucial role in the etiology of rosacea. The EGF-R is unusual in that it is expressed luminally in the gut (4,5). The primary role of the luminally expressed gut EGF-R is to provide a healing mechanism for damaged epithelial cells in the gut. One of the endogenous ligands for the EGF-R is EGF which is found in saliva and when swallowed promotes healing in damaged epithelial cells lining the gut (5). Additionally, salivary EGF may also finds its way into circulation through this pathway based upon the observation that surgical removal of the salivary and parotid glands in experimental animals reduces blood concentrations of EGF.

    Infection of the GI tract with H. pylori leading to ulcers causes an upregulation (increase in density) of the EGF-R (6). Hence any substance in the gut capable of binding the EGF-R will have increased access to the peripheral circulation. We believe the reason why eradication of H. pylori reduces rosacea symptoms is because it downregulates (or reduces the numbers of) the EGF-R. Hence gut borne substances which would have gained entry to the circulation through the EGF-R and which may cause rosacea are partially denied access into the circulation.

    In support of the notion that the EGF-R is central to the development of rosacea is the observation that EGF-R blocking pharmaceuticals elicit erythematous papules and follicular pustules (7-9) that likely occur because of an overexpression of the EGF-R in keratinocytes (8).

    In regard to diet, the following substances also bind the gut EGF-R and gain access to circulation:

    1. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) a dietary lectin which is found in both whole and refined wheat products (10).
    2. Peanut agglutinin (PNA) a dietary lectin which is found in peanuts (11).
    3. Tomato lectin (TL), a dietary lectin which is found in tomatoes (12)
    4. Phytohemmagglutinin (PHA) a dietary lectin which is found in kidney beans and all other Phaseolus vugaris bean varieties (13, 14)
    5. Soybean agglutinin (SBA) a dietary lectin which is found in all soybeans and soy products, whose specifity is to one of the sugars in the EGF-R (15)
    6. Betacellulin (BTC) a hormone found in milk and cheese which is a natural ligand for the EGF (16, 17).
    7. Egg white lysozyme, a lectin found in the whites of eggs (18)

    Hence, once these dietary ligands for the EGF-R bind the gut EGF-R, some eventually escape destruction in gut epithelial cell lysozomes and reach circulation intact where they can bind the keratinocyte EGF-R and cause increased proliferation and inflammation (19). Dietary factors which can bind the EGF-R should be strongly implicated in the etiology of rosacea. Randomized controlled clinical trials will be needed needed to test the efficacy of elimination diets using known dietary ligands for the EGF-R.


    Hopefully this can help at least one other person. I know that avoiding these foods definitely helps myself. As does killing H. Pylori with oregano oil or cabbage juice, or healing my stomach and gut lining with L-Glutamine.

  8. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    869
    Country: Greece

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by xcvq View Post
    I've been drinking and my disgusting skin at this moment has caused me to reflect on my Rosacea.

    I've been battling Rosacea and Seborrheic Dermatitis for 20 years now thanks to taking the acne drug Accutane at age 18 and thus ruining my life.

    I've always noticed how important diet is to my skin. Eating lasagna every day? Very bad. Eating lettuce wrapped burgers and mashed potatoes? Good. Yet still I often disobey these food rules and maybe my hope here is that by writing this I will be able to get back on track.

    Even though my problems are Accutane-induced, I believe they share a common pathway with people who ended up with this for other reasons. I'll skip over the long winded, sulfur metabolism-related reasons I think Accutane gave me gut dysbiosis, but I believe it's dysbiosis that results in Rosacea. At least my Rosacea, and perhaps the Rosacea of many others.

    I've spent about 15 years trawling through pubmed and other places trying to fix my problems and the one study that's been the most helpful to me is in regards to diet and the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor. Not sure, but the study may have vanished from the internet. Luckily I saved it. I've pasted it below:

    Role that diet may play in the etiology of rosacea

    The clue to the role that diet may play in the etiology of rosacea comes from the observation that pharmaceutical eradication of the bacteria, Helicobacter pylori, improves or ameliorates symptoms in rosacea patients (1-3). H. pylori is the bacteria that causes gastric and duodenal ulcers. Although the physiological basis for the curative effect of H. pylori eradication is unknown, we believe that a mechanism in the human gut, the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) likely plays a crucial role in the etiology of rosacea. The EGF-R is unusual in that it is expressed luminally in the gut (4,5). The primary role of the luminally expressed gut EGF-R is to provide a healing mechanism for damaged epithelial cells in the gut. One of the endogenous ligands for the EGF-R is EGF which is found in saliva and when swallowed promotes healing in damaged epithelial cells lining the gut (5). Additionally, salivary EGF may also finds its way into circulation through this pathway based upon the observation that surgical removal of the salivary and parotid glands in experimental animals reduces blood concentrations of EGF.

    Infection of the GI tract with H. pylori leading to ulcers causes an upregulation (increase in density) of the EGF-R (6). Hence any substance in the gut capable of binding the EGF-R will have increased access to the peripheral circulation. We believe the reason why eradication of H. pylori reduces rosacea symptoms is because it downregulates (or reduces the numbers of) the EGF-R. Hence gut borne substances which would have gained entry to the circulation through the EGF-R and which may cause rosacea are partially denied access into the circulation.

    In support of the notion that the EGF-R is central to the development of rosacea is the observation that EGF-R blocking pharmaceuticals elicit erythematous papules and follicular pustules (7-9) that likely occur because of an overexpression of the EGF-R in keratinocytes (8).

    In regard to diet, the following substances also bind the gut EGF-R and gain access to circulation:

    1. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) a dietary lectin which is found in both whole and refined wheat products (10).
    2. Peanut agglutinin (PNA) a dietary lectin which is found in peanuts (11).
    3. Tomato lectin (TL), a dietary lectin which is found in tomatoes (12)
    4. Phytohemmagglutinin (PHA) a dietary lectin which is found in kidney beans and all other Phaseolus vugaris bean varieties (13, 14)
    5. Soybean agglutinin (SBA) a dietary lectin which is found in all soybeans and soy products, whose specifity is to one of the sugars in the EGF-R (15)
    6. Betacellulin (BTC) a hormone found in milk and cheese which is a natural ligand for the EGF (16, 17).
    7. Egg white lysozyme, a lectin found in the whites of eggs (18)

    Hence, once these dietary ligands for the EGF-R bind the gut EGF-R, some eventually escape destruction in gut epithelial cell lysozomes and reach circulation intact where they can bind the keratinocyte EGF-R and cause increased proliferation and inflammation (19). Dietary factors which can bind the EGF-R should be strongly implicated in the etiology of rosacea. Randomized controlled clinical trials will be needed needed to test the efficacy of elimination diets using known dietary ligands for the EGF-R.


    Hopefully this can help at least one other person. I know that avoiding these foods definitely helps myself. As does killing H. Pylori with oregano oil or cabbage juice, or healing my stomach and gut lining with L-Glutamine.
    Do you have stomach issues? Me too, from an NSAID, I believe. My symptoms are nausea and a squeezing pain around my lower ribs. How did your problems start? You know, a friend of mine believes that our chronic stomach problems are caused by systemic demodex infection. I know that it wasn?t scientifically confirmed in humans, but it happens in cats and dogs, so why not in humans too? Moreover, I have been repeatedly tested for H. Pylori and found negative every time.

  9. #19
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Posts
    147
    Country: England

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MariaSt View Post
    Do you have stomach issues? Me too, from an NSAID, I believe. My symptoms are nausea and a squeezing pain around my lower ribs. How did your problems start? You know, a friend of mine believes that our chronic stomach problems are caused by systemic demodex infection. I know that it wasn?t scientifically confirmed in humans, but it happens in cats and dogs, so why not in humans too? Moreover, I have been repeatedly tested for H. Pylori and found negative every time.
    all my flushing , redness and gut problems started very quickly - about 1 week after a specific situation ... i finally found out i had stomach and duodenal ulcers ( after 4 years of pestering the doctor and 2 endoscopies ! ) and i still havent recovered .
    i was on PPI's for about 6 months and things did get better , seb derm went completely but the flushing remained ...

    ive recently come off the PPI's and tried to slowly introduce carbs like white bread , potatoes etc back in to my diet as i found they were big triggers - it hasnt gone well . within 4 days i came out in a huge SD rash in my beard and around one eye that has taken a month to get back under control and the flushing is worse than ever .

    ive tested negative for h pylori before but im doing 3 tests on monday ( blood and stool ) so will see if its a factor in all this ... if im negative again im going back on the PPI's to hopefully calm everything down again ...

  10. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Posts
    869
    Country: Greece

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by boris View Post
    all my flushing , redness and gut problems started very quickly - about 1 week after a specific situation ... i finally found out i had stomach and duodenal ulcers ( after 4 years of pestering the doctor and 2 endoscopies ! ) and i still havent recovered .
    i was on PPI's for about 6 months and things did get better , seb derm went completely but the flushing remained ...

    ive recently come off the PPI's and tried to slowly introduce carbs like white bread , potatoes etc back in to my diet as i found they were big triggers - it hasnt gone well . within 4 days i came out in a huge SD rash in my beard and around one eye that has taken a month to get back under control and the flushing is worse than ever .

    ive tested negative for h pylori before but im doing 3 tests on monday ( blood and stool ) so will see if its a factor in all this ... if im negative again im going back on the PPI's to hopefully calm everything down again ...
    I am sorry to hear you are struggling with both of these illnesses. My rosacea is under control luckily, but the stomach issues have taken over my life. I take omeprazole, but it doesn?t help 100%. And I noticed that the same foods that bother rosacea bother the gastritis too. So strange. I assume that when they take stomach biopsies, they don?t look for demodex at all. They actually don?t look for any other bacteria except HP and that?s wrong. I took metronidazole at some point and while it helped with the pain, it didn?t help with the nausea, nor with the skin redness. I think I will try Bactrimel.
    Please, tell me about the results of your tests. The only thing they found in my case were elevated pancreatic enzymes and very high coxsakie B2 and B4 antibodies. There is no treatment for coxsakie yet.

Similar Threads

  1. Science Daily - Key protein involved in triggering inflammation
    By RSS News Bot in forum Other News Feeds
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 30th June 2018, 03:00 AM
  2. Its really interesting to see what is triggering me, diet.
    By scrumptious in forum Diet, lifestyle and relationships
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12th March 2017, 07:42 PM
  3. constant triggering
    By pricelinda28@yahoo.com in forum Newbie questions / Introduction
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 27th July 2014, 12:05 AM
  4. Bad rosacea foods; Good rosacea foods
    By Bradley in forum Topical and oral products (non-prescription)
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 11th May 2008, 10:51 AM
  5. Vitamin B-50 Complex triggering papules
    By Wistar in forum Topical and oral products (non-prescription)
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 3rd April 2008, 04:25 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •