Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28

Thread: Sulfur mixture for SD/mild rosacea

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    4

    Default Sulfur mixture for SD/mild rosacea

    Hi, I'm thinking about buying pure sulfur powder and mixing it with something, like MCT oil and leaving it on for 5 to 10 minutes.

    Wondering if anybody has tried this? I could just buy a sulfur shampoo but they often contain fragances and other ingredients that are harsh on skin. I would be using it on my beard area, eyebrows, and above my lip. Those are the places where I get my flare ups.

    Any input would be appreciate it.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,487

    Default

    Perhaps you could try OptiMSM, (methylsulfonylmethane) which is obtained by distillation and doesn't contain any contaminants. This is a source of organic sulfur, and is water soluble at up to 10% to 15% concentrations. It's a white powder that is edible, has no odor, and contains about 37% sulfur -- so this is going to make a 3-4% sulfur solution, max, but it has the advantage of being fully dissolved in water, or a lotion or shampoo, so it's probably going to be more effective, because the dissolved sulfur is in a bio-available form.

    I'm not sure if anyone here has tried MSM topically, so you might use the search-feature to learn more. I'm curious about tis, so please report back.

    Inorganic sulfur is yellow, has as strong smell, and probably a lot of heavy metals, and is almost insoluble in oil or water. You can make a slurry-dispersion with this. NU-Stock is 70% sulfur and I believe it's available at Tractor Supply Corporation. The skin-burning, smell, and color make this product difficult to use for the time necessary to give it a fair test against demodex, but Kisha has done this effectively and extensively reported her results on this forum.

    There's also a cream called Flowers of Sulfur, sold at Walgreens. that is about 5% inorganic sulfur, I believe.

    Topical sulfur for humans is recommended at up to 5% but is allowed at 10%.

    I recently started consuming 1/4 teaspoon of OptiMSM per day, dusted on top of my morning cereal. It has a very slightly bitter taste, and is said to be part of a healthy diet (because foods now are very low in sulfur due to over-farming).

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2017
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Thank you so much Tom. I will try OptiMSM in water

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Bay Area, CA
    Posts
    366
    Country: United States

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by juan0316 View Post
    Thank you so much Tom. I will try OptiMSM in water

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk


    I don't have SD, but this stuff has really helped reduce the redness I experience from rosacea (it's MSM gel):

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...0?ie=UTF8&th=1

    Hope this helps,
    M.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Honolulu, HI, USA
    Posts
    4,776

    Default

    There is also a cream that includes OptiMSM, Skin Food Fix Ahh...mazing Cream. Or if you prefer the Pure OptiMSM flakes.
    Brady Barrows
    Join the RRDi

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    459
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    I'm very intrigued by this, because I've been looking for a cosmetically acceptable sulfur product for ages now, and the only ones readily available are poorly formulated greasy ointments that need to be washed off after 10 minutes. It had never occurred to me to look into MSM instead, yet its bioavailability and water-solubility would indeed make it a much more attractive alternative to inorganic sulfur.

    I've found an MSM gel which contains 15% MSM, with the other ingredients being just Water, Propylene Glycol, Hydroxyethylcellulose, Sodium Hydroxide, Citric Acid, Sodium Benzoate. I'll definitely give it a shot, and ditch the sulfur ointment that I've hardly been using due to its greasiness.

    The appeal of sulfur is that it's one of those very rare ingredients that has proven utility against acne, rosacea, and various dermatoses, so it's particularly helpful for those of us who have skin conditions that overlap; that's why I've been so keen on finding a suitable leave-on topical treatment that has it, but the options are few and far between. It seems a very underrated ingredient these days, despite having one of the longest histories of medical use in treating skin conditions.
    Last edited by sejon; 16th June 2018 at 07:08 AM.

  7. #7
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sejon View Post
    I'm very intrigued by this, because I've been looking for a cosmetically acceptable sulfur product for ages now, and the only ones readily available are poorly formulated greasy ointments that need to be washed off after 10 minutes. It had never occurred to me to look into MSM instead, yet its bioavailability and water-solubility would indeed make it a much more attractive alternative to inorganic sulfur.

    I've found an MSM gel which contains 15% MSM, with the other ingredients being just Water, Propylene Glycol, Hydroxyethylcellulose, Sodium Hydroxide, Citric Acid, Sodium Benzoate. I'll definitely give it a shot, and ditch the sulfur ointment that I've hardly been using due to its greasiness.

    The appeal of sulfur is that it's one of those very rare ingredients that has proven utility against acne, rosacea, and various dermatoses, so it's particularly helpful for those of us who have skin conditions that overlap; that's why I've been so keen on finding a suitable leave-on topical treatment that has it, but the options are few and far between. It seems a very underrated ingredient these days, despite having one of the longest histories of medical use in treating skin conditions.

    hi, I'm the OP, using another account because I couldn't remember my password and recovering it has been a pain. This is exactly why I've been so keen on trying sulfur. After doing so MUCH research about SD, acne, and rosacea I found an extensive blog post at "simpleskincarescience" backed by research and clinical studies, it discusses sulfur as one of the more natural alternatives to various fungal conditions caused by melassezia.

    I used MSM powder diluted in water for a day and noticed a reduction in redness the next morning, the thing is I'm not sure if this mixture would have the optimal pH for effectiveness? so I might give the MSM gel that you mentioned a try instead.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,487

    Default

    I made OptiMSM at a 10% concentration with 90% distilled water, and found it had a pH of 7, indicating that OptiMSM will not probably not change the pH of any cosmetic it's mixed with. OptiMSM is easily water-soluble, so you can mix the powder into any aqueous cosmetic, at any concentration up to 10-15%.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Posts
    459
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    I've been trying both internal and topical MSM for the past couple of days.

    Like Tom, I mix a scoop of MSM powder in with my morning oatmeal. I don't have any high expectations of internal MSM having a direct effect on my skin conditions (acne and SD), because these are local cutaneous conditions, and MSM taken internally will of course be diluted throughout the body so very little of it will actually reach the skin, but the fact that it's a powerful systemic anti-inflammatory certainly couldn't hurt. What piqued my interest with internal MSM is that there's a lot of research backing its utility in relieving joint and muscle pain, and since starting it a couple days ago I've already experienced considerable relief with my chronic lower back pain (the plight of working a desk job). For this reason alone I would be happy to continue taking MSM indefinitely, regardless of whether or not it helps my skin conditions.

    I also now use a topical MSM gel for my face and neck, although the ingredients differ slightly from the gel I had mentioned above (here they are: AQUA (WATER), DIMETHYL SULPHONE (a.k.a. MSM), HYDROXYETHYLLCLULOSE, GLYCERINE, SODIUM LEVULINATE, SODIUM ANISATE, LACTIC ACID). I'm not sure what's the concentration of MSM, but given that it's the second ingredient I reckon it's sufficient. After applying, the gel just sits on the skin for a while, which was puzzling at first, but then after a few minutes it suddenly rapidly absorbs, leaving no trace whatsoever.

    It's surprisingly very moisturising on its own so I find myself not needing to use a separate moisturiser. Sulfur is keratolytic so I surmise that MSM in sufficient concentration has an exfoliative effect on the skin without drying it (this is a boon for us suffering from flaky skin) which means I might be able to ditch my mandelic acid exfoliant, too. Also, MSM, unlike inorganic sulfur, functions as an antioxidant which likely means it provides some degree of photo-protection (not to argue that it could replace diligent use of sunscreen or a hat, but it's a handy bonus, especially considering other exfoliants like alpha-hydroxy acids and retinoids are known to make the skin more sensitive to sun damage, and that's why sunscreen is always heavily advised when using them -- it's quite a big irony considering AHA's and retinoids are primarily used to treat the effects of sun damage).

    It's early days to tell if it's improving my SD, but even if it just helps my acne I suspect this one will be a staple, and quite possibly replace my Skinoren (azelaic acid) gel once my current tube of it runs out.
    Last edited by sejon; 26th June 2018 at 09:25 AM.

  10. #10
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Posts
    7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Busby View Post
    I made OptiMSM at a 10% concentration with 90% distilled water, and found it had a pH of 7, indicating that OptiMSM will not probably not change the pH of any cosmetic it's mixed with. OptiMSM is easily water-soluble, so you can mix the powder into any aqueous cosmetic, at any concentration up to 10-15%.
    That is good to know, thanks.

    Anyways, I had ordered the MSM gel from amazon and have used it for a couple of days, I have to say the ability of this gel to calm redness is pretty great, and I attribute it to the MSM, of course. I will continue using it a few times a week. I find that it does help with the flakes a little but the most impressive thing for me is the reduction of redness/irritation.

Similar Threads

  1. Mixture for Face....
    By mrsmoof in forum Topical and oral products (non-prescription)
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 4th June 2012, 10:04 AM
  2. Hi there - seborrheic blepharitis, MGD, mild seborrheic eczema and mild rosacea
    By dijon84 in forum Newbie questions / Introduction
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 27th May 2012, 04:40 PM
  3. I'm Bub, Mild Ros, Not-Mild Thread Veins
    By Bubdylan in forum Newbie questions / Introduction
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 8th March 2010, 04:21 PM
  4. compound mixture RX
    By jhdoublin in forum Prescription medications
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 24th April 2009, 07:07 PM
  5. Azelaic Acid mixture cream
    By snuffleupagus in forum Prescription medications
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 13th June 2008, 05:07 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •