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Thread: My skin healed after gluten/dairy free diet

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by MissM View Post
    AGE's are formed in the body by eating foods that contain protein and sugars cooked at high temperatures, including those high protein animal foods such as meat, eggs, butter and roasted nuts. AGE's are not found in whole plant foods in their raw form. Lightly steaming foods do not form AGE's nor does boiling foods (see my link below).

    I also want to mention that though I respect the credentials of MDs practicing modern medicine, medical doctors (or dermatologists) do not have an extensive background in nutrition science, nor are they generally are familiar with the breadth of scientific literature on healthy diet patterns. While I agree that processed foods, dairy and refined sugar should be eliminated from the diet for optimal health, I would never recommend decreasing healthy carbohydrate foods (such as fruit or whole grains) unless someone has a specific sensitivity or allergy to these foods (like a gluten intolerance). These whole, plant foods contain fiber, micronutrients, phytochemicals, antioxidants, epigenetic factors that change how our DNA is read (for the better), and promote decreased inflammation by balancing our gut microbiome.

    Just my two cents since my academic background is in nutrition science and I have worked in this field for over 20 years. I often try to stay of these kind of conversations since this is what I do all day, every day, but I want people to know that there are other options besides the "low-carb" method. While that might work for some (and I'm glad that it does!), it might be the demise for others. Fifteen years ago before I went on a 100% plant based diet, I had serious candida, cystic acne and skin rashes all over my body for about 3 years. I was on a meat and vegetable diet for an entire year because everyone told me "sugar causes inflammation" and "feeds yeast" and I kept getting worse and worse. Within 5 weeks of adopting a raw vegan diet, high in fruit (at the time), all my symptoms went away and it took about a year for my digestion to come back into balance (I also had IBS which I don't have anymore). So, I put this out there for anyone who feels like "low carb" is the only solution, because it's not for everyone. To this day, I am not inflamed (I flush to high temperatures and emotions, but my skin is pale when I'm not triggered) and I rarely get sick (it's been over 3 years since I've had a cold or the flu). So, a whole food, plant based diet (that contains healthy carbohydrate sources) can also be an alternative solution.



    https://www.healthline.com/nutrition...ducts#section2 --------->


    Modern diets are linked to AGEs building up in the body.

    This is mostly due to popular methods of cooking that expose food to dry heat.

    These include barbecuing, grilling, roasting, baking, frying, sautéing, broiling, searing and toasting (7).

    These cooking methods may make food taste, smell and look good, but they raise AGEs to dangerous levels (8).

    In fact, dry heat causes AGE formation to increase by 10 to 100 times the levels in uncooked foods (7).

    Certain foods, such as animal foods high in fat and protein, are more susceptible to AGE formation during cooking (7).

    Foods highest in AGEs include meat (especially red meat), certain cheeses, fried eggs, butter, cream cheese, margarine, mayonnaise, oils and nuts. Fried foods and highly processed products also contain high levels.

    So even if your diet appears reasonably healthy, you may consume an unhealthy amount of harmful AGEs just because of the way your food is cooked.
    Hi MissM,

    Very interesting read. Do you think that the redness of associated with subtype 1 rosacea can be reversed with diet. I have always thought of it is a vascular disease and hence why people, like myself, get success with laser treatments. I am working with a functional medicine doctor at the moment and we are trying to tackle the root cause of the inflammation, but would you say that if you tackle the root cause, the redness will diminish over time? My rosacea came on overnight, like literally one day I woke up with it, having had perfect skin for 21 years. This suggests to me that sometheing triggered this inflammatory response in my body leading to overnight rosacaea. Do you think diet can help with the flushing and redness asscoiated with subtype 1?

    Thanks,

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seb91 View Post
    Hi MissM,

    Very interesting read. Do you think that the redness of associated with subtype 1 rosacea can be reversed with diet. I have always thought of it is a vascular disease and hence why people, like myself, get success with laser treatments. I am working with a functional medicine doctor at the moment and we are trying to tackle the root cause of the inflammation, but would you say that if you tackle the root cause, the redness will diminish over time? My rosacea came on overnight, like literally one day I woke up with it, having had perfect skin for 21 years. This suggests to me that sometheing triggered this inflammatory response in my body leading to overnight rosacaea. Do you think diet can help with the flushing and redness asscoiated with subtype 1?

    Thanks,
    Hi Seb91,

    Thank you for your comments! I wish I had the answer to all of your questions, but I don't....and I don't think many doctors or dermatologists know either (from my experience anyway). I too have often wondered the same about what is "causing" the inflammation and I think it can vary from person to person. I personally don't think "flushing" is inflammation. I think flushing is a physiological response to a specific trigger...like heat, emotions, hormones, etc. Some of us have more of a tendancy to flush genetically and/or somehow the (nervous?/vascular?/hormonal?) system gets off balance, and those who suffer subtype 1 or erythromelalgia, flush more readily and frequently.

    Persistent redness could be caused from an increase in vasculature and/or inflammation due to factors such a diet or demodex infestation. I also think rosacea is sometimes a blanket term (like IBS is to digestive disturbances) for any symptoms related to flushing or erythema, but the causes can be multi-factorial and vary from person to person. For example, I had a non-inflammatory version of demodex infestation (pityriasis folliculorum) that arose after a period of stress in my life and also sun damage, along with not washing my face properly (and over using oils to moisturize). For me, I believe that these factors put me at risk for demodex to flourish. I tried many diet changes including taking out fruit (that was the only "sugar" I was eating), grains, gluten, soy, corn, histamine containing foods, etc., but no diet changes helped me. I struggled doing the "natural route" for over a year with no improvements. I needed an anti-demodectic (Soolantra) to wipe out the overpopulation and my skin has been normal ever since (for 9 months now). I am back to eating my whole food, plant based diet (with a lot of fruit) and my skin is great. I flush very rarely and to specific triggers as mentioned before (heat and emotions) which is "normal" for me and part of my genetic make-up.

    For some people, I do understand that diet is the answer and imperative in controlling the symptoms. For me, I don't believe diet was my issue. However, as a registered dietitian and someone who is extremely passionate about mitigating disease through diet, I whole-heartedly believe that is we consume a healthy diet (lacking processed foods and eating the foods that lower inflammation in our body by different pathways), we are setting our system up for success for fighting any disease. Our diet is the foundation of our health.

    I hope these thoughts help,
    M. <3
    Last edited by MissM; 1st May 2018 at 10:57 PM.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by MissM View Post
    Hi Seb91,

    Thank you for your comments! I wish I had the answer to all of your questions, but I don't....and I don't think many doctors or dermatologists know either (from my experience anyway). I too have often wondered the same about what is "causing" the inflammation and I think it can vary from person to person. I personally don't think "flushing" is inflammation. I think flushing is a physiological response to a specific trigger...like heat, emotions, hormones, etc. Some of us have more of a tendancy to flush genetically and/or somehow the (nervous?/vascular?/hormonal?) system gets off balance, and those who suffer subtype 1 or erythromelalgia, flush more readily and frequently.

    Persistent redness could be caused from an increase in vasculature and/or inflammation due to factors such a diet or demodex infestation. I also think rosacea is sometimes a blanket term (like IBS is to digestive disturbances) for any symptoms related to flushing or erythema, but the causes can be multi-factorial and vary from person to person. For example, I had a non-inflammatory version of demodex infestation (pityriasis folliculorum) that arose after a period of stress in my life and also sun damage, along with not washing my face properly (and over using oils to moisturize). For me, I believe that these factors put me at risk for demodex to flourish. I tried many diet changes including taking out fruit (that was the only "sugar" I was eating), grains, gluten, soy, corn, histamine containing foods, etc., but no diet changes helped me. I struggled doing the "natural route" for over a year with no improvements. I needed an anti-demodectic (Soolantra) to wipe out the overpopulation and my skin has been normal ever since (for 9 months now). I am back to eating my whole food, plant based diet (with a lot of fruit) and my skin is great. I flush very rarely and to specific triggers as mentioned before (heat and emotions) which is "normal" for me and part of my genetic make-up.

    For some people, I do understand that diet is the answer and imperative in controlling the symptoms. For me, I don't believe diet was my issue. However, as a registered dietitian and someone who is extremely passionate about mitigating disease through diet, I whole-heartedly believe that is we consume a healthy diet (lacking processed foods and eating the foods that lower inflammation in our body by different pathways), we are setting our system up for success for fighting any disease. Our diet is the foundation of our health.

    I hope these thoughts help,
    M. <3
    Thanks Miss M - I found both of your above answers incredibly helpful.
    The key does seem to be to tackle the demodex infestation and to also deal with your immune system so that it can keep the demodex population under control.
    Your comments about fruit and fruit sugar are really helpful - I have been trying to reduce sugar from diet completely but obviously wasn't sure if "sugar" meant refined sugar or whether it included all sugars such as fructose in fruit etc. Fruit is good for you and as you say it contains a lot of vitamins and minerals, which we need to thrive.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by MissM View Post
    AGE's are formed in the body by eating foods that contain protein and sugars cooked at high temperatures, including those high protein animal foods such as meat, eggs, butter and roasted nuts. AGE's are not found in whole plant foods in their raw form. Lightly steaming foods do not form AGE's nor does boiling foods (see my link below).

    I also want to mention that though I respect the credentials of MDs practicing modern medicine, medical doctors (or dermatologists) do not have an extensive background in nutrition science, nor are they generally are familiar with the breadth of scientific literature on healthy diet patterns. While I agree that processed foods, dairy and refined sugar should be eliminated from the diet for optimal health, I would never recommend decreasing healthy carbohydrate foods (such as fruit or whole grains) unless someone has a specific sensitivity or allergy to these foods (like a gluten intolerance). These whole, plant foods contain fiber, micronutrients, phytochemicals, antioxidants, epigenetic factors that change how our DNA is read (for the better), and promote decreased inflammation by balancing our gut microbiome.

    Just my two cents since my academic background is in nutrition science and I have worked in this field for over 20 years. I often try to stay of these kind of conversations since this is what I do all day, every day, but I want people to know that there are other options besides the "low-carb" method. While that might work for some (and I'm glad that it does!), it might be the demise for others. Fifteen years ago before I went on a 100% plant based diet, I had serious candida, cystic acne and skin rashes all over my body for about 3 years. I was on a meat and vegetable diet for an entire year because everyone told me "sugar causes inflammation" and "feeds yeast" and I kept getting worse and worse. Within 5 weeks of adopting a raw vegan diet, high in fruit (at the time), all my symptoms went away and it took about a year for my digestion to come back into balance (I also had IBS which I don't have anymore). So, I put this out there for anyone who feels like "low carb" is the only solution, because it's not for everyone. To this day, I am not inflamed (I flush to high temperatures and emotions, but my skin is pale when I'm not triggered) and I rarely get sick (it's been over 3 years since I've had a cold or the flu). So, a whole food, plant based diet (that contains healthy carbohydrate sources) can also be an alternative solution.



    https://www.healthline.com/nutrition...ducts#section2 --------->


    Modern diets are linked to AGEs building up in the body.

    This is mostly due to popular methods of cooking that expose food to dry heat.

    These include barbecuing, grilling, roasting, baking, frying, sautéing, broiling, searing and toasting (7).

    These cooking methods may make food taste, smell and look good, but they raise AGEs to dangerous levels (8).

    In fact, dry heat causes AGE formation to increase by 10 to 100 times the levels in uncooked foods (7).

    Certain foods, such as animal foods high in fat and protein, are more susceptible to AGE formation during cooking (7).

    Foods highest in AGEs include meat (especially red meat), certain cheeses, fried eggs, butter, cream cheese, margarine, mayonnaise, oils and nuts. Fried foods and highly processed products also contain high levels.

    So even if your diet appears reasonably healthy, you may consume an unhealthy amount of harmful AGEs just because of the way your food is cooked.
    Hi Miss M

    It would be helpful if you could suggest what one or two days meal plans might look like on the vegan diet you are suggesting and what none meat foods you would avoid (if any). Is there are recipe book you find particularly helpful to keep to this diet? You eat mostly raw foods?

    Thanks for your help.
    Last edited by antwantsclear; 3rd May 2018 at 02:49 PM.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by antwantsclear View Post
    Hi Miss M

    It would be helpful if you could suggest what one or two days meal plans might look like on the vegan diet you are suggesting and what none meat foods you would avoid (if any). Is there are recipe book you find particularly helpful to keep to this diet? You eat mostly raw foods?

    Thanks for your help.

    Hi Antwantsclear,

    Sorry for the delay...I was out of town this weekend. . I'm happy to share what I eat, but please know that I understand many people have dietary challenges (like histamine intolerances) and cannot tolerate the foods that I eat below. This is the diet that feels best for me. I understand that others do well on other kinds of diets and I am not sharing this to refute that. I just want people to know that there are options out there to help decrease inflammation in the body and it often takes patience to find what kind of diet works best for the individual. With that said, whole plant foods (in their most natural state) are freaking magical and if one can tolerate the variety, they should all be included.

    So, yes, I do eat a large percentage of my diet "raw", and it's heavy on fruit, especially in the summer. In general, I eat a variety of fruit (apples, pears, berries, pineapple, melons, mangos, etc.) and vegetables (lightly steamed or raw---including kale, chard, broccoli, cauliflower, spinach, carrots, beets, etc.), along with sweet potatoes (Japanese, orange and purple) and legumes (all beans and lentils), and during the winter I will sometimes have oats, quinoa and brown rice for another carbohydrate source (but I rather eat fruit if possible). I sometimes have some nice high quality bread if I make a batch of soup, but I usually like fruit and whole grains better. I eat plenty of fats (avocados, nuts and seeds) as well.

    So, it's spring now, and I'm eating more light and raw. This is what I have been eating this past week:

    Breakfast:

    Fruit bowl (banana, apple, blueberries, raspberries) topped with homemade almond milk, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, ground flax-meal and sometimes almond butter or walnuts.

    Snack: Fruit (watermelon and grapes)

    Lunch: Big Kale salad with mashed avocado, lemon and sea salt, lentils, nuts/seeds, carrots, cucumber, steamed broccoli, quinoa.

    Snack: Fruit (apple)

    Dinner: Sweet potato with and assortment of steamed and/or raw veggies (kale, cabbage, carrots, beets, chard, etc.), topped with beans and often a home-made dressing (made from tahini or cashew nuts).

    Dessert: Fruit or a dark chocolate square



    I like this website for recipes:

    https://www.forksoverknives.com/recipes/#gs.Ohcco6U


    For me though, my body feels best when I eat simply so I don't make very complicated recipes unless I am cooking for guests. I make a big pot of beans and lentils (in my crockpot), a batch of quinoa, and I also bake a few sweet potatoes ahead of time and that's my meal prep for the week. Then I can add those ingredients to my steamed or raw veggies and supplement with fruit.

    I hope this is helpful,
    M.

  6. #26
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    Thanks for sharing Miss M.
    Last edited by antwantsclear; 7th May 2018 at 11:14 AM.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by antwantsclear View Post
    Hi Miss M

    It would be helpful if you could suggest what one or two days meal plans might look like on the vegan diet you are suggesting and what none meat foods you would avoid (if any). Is there are recipe book you find particularly helpful to keep to this diet? You eat mostly raw foods?

    Thanks for your help.
    Anyone familiar with the Kind Diet? Some report clearer skin and healthier looking hair and nails since starting a vegan diet. There are a couple menu plans too for anyone interested.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rosie2018 View Post
    I have had a lot of rosacea spots and inflammation in my face. After cutting out dairy, my skin started to get much better, but not 100 %.

    Now I have been on gluten and dairy free diet for a few weeks and my skin is almost back to normal, no new spots or inflammation at all. I'm not sure if it is gluten or both gluten and dairy that causes my rosacea, but I will keep my diet and see what happens if I introduce something new.

    I don't use any meds or skin products.
    Anyone who tried a strict gluten free diet?
    Does dairy break you out bad?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #29
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    Red face

    1. I try to eat more fresh fruits and vegetables.
    2. I don't use sugar and salt at all.
    3. Avoid eating too much meat.

    It seems easy but very helpful

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