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Thread: Microneedle? erythematotelangiectatic Subtype 1 Rosacea? redness. 48 years old.

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    Default Microneedle? erythematotelangiectatic Subtype 1 Rosacea? redness. 48 years old.

    Redness of facial skin - rosacea or melasma ?? i have been treating my "patches" of skin with melasma treatments for several months now, and on the whole, my facial skin looks a lot better - intact and smooth-ish, but I STILL HAVE A LOT of redness over-all.

    have been using melasma treatments - dermarolling/microneedling with vitamin c serum, and although that's touted as great for collagen production, it does nothing for day to day facial redness as far as i can tell.

    If I don't put anything on my face it does not 'flush/blush/get red' so i am not sure i have rosacea. BUT my face remains red for long, unexplained periods of time --- i have had an on and off 'ruddy complexion' since my 20s -- rosy cheeks, blush, flush, -- whatever you know what i mean ---- so that makes me think i DO have rosacea -- probably coupled with melasma due to all of the sun damage from being a cyclist for so many years...

    This 'thread' is not to supply antidotes, it's abut questions, and finding people with similar symptoms so that we are better informed when choosing our curative paths.

    melasma? rosacea? i know it is not kprf.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Mistica's Avatar
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    Hi,

    I developed melasma due to taking the progesterone only pill. Attempts to treat the melasma with Retin A irritated the hell out of my skin, and led to rosacea, and later on, severe flushing, due to being given ventolin (which I did not need). I also had gut issues and a bunch of other stuff going on at the same time.
    Lots of disasters happened to me along the way leading to my current state.

    That aside. Melasma. Did you know it is not just a pigment disorder? It actually has a vascular component.
    Here is one article which speaks about it.
    https://www.mdedge.com/edermatologyn...ponent-melasma

    I battled the hideous mess for years and it ruined my life. Trying to treat Rosacea on a background of melasma is a nightmare.

    Later on in years, I discovered I was iodine deficient and supplementation finally rid me of the remnants of the pigmentation issue. I do realise it could still be lurking beneath the skin.

    In addition, pigment issues are often connected to thyroid dysfunction. I went on to develop Hashimoto's disease during the time I was iodine deficient, but hashi's is a complex disease and has many other contributing factors.

    Currently I am completely free of melasma, but struggle to completely rid myself of rosacea and flushing, although for a couple of years, I was in a pretty decent state.

    Oral and topical niacinamide (which I take/use), are also beneficial for alleviating melasma. Melasma has an oxidative stress factor which the above help alleviate. I take oral vitamin C, but don't use it topically due to irritation.

    I also use ZZ cream, which I mix with my niacinamide gel and that helps calm and control my subtype 1 rosacea/flushing. I expect it helps with controlling pigment too.

    High dose oral vitamin C, moderate zinc and gut antimicrobials have brought about a reduction of melasma in a number of other women. A quick google should lead you to them.

    Another thing you might consider is elevating your glutathione levels with NAC. Around 200mg. Any more might cause flushing.
    Glutathione is considered a master antioxidant and could help relieve both your melasma and rosacea.

    Of course, the above treatments take a fairly long time to work, but I do believe they have merit. I have spent decades researching the subject and applying different methods.

    IPL can make melasma much worse and progressive. Been there, done that.

    Based on what you say, I suspect you do have a form of rosacea/flushing.
    Previous Numerous IPL.
    Supplements: Niacinamide, Vit K2, low D3, Vit A. Moderate Dose Vit C, Iodine, Taurine, Magnesium. Very low dose B's. Low dose zinc (to correct deficiency).
    Skin Care: No Cleanser, ZZ cream mixed with Niacinamide gel 4% and LMW HA 2%, ethyl ascorbate 2%.

    Treating for gut dysbiosis.(This is helping).
    Previous GAPS diet. Have now introduced lots of fibre.
    Fermented Foods. Intermittent fasting -16-18 hours.
    Oral Colostrum. Helps reduce food reactions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mistica View Post
    Hi,

    I developed melasma due to taking the progesterone only pill. Attempts to treat the melasma with Retin A irritated the hell out of my skin, and led to rosacea, and later on, severe flushing, due to being given ventolin (which I did not need). I also had gut issues and a bunch of other stuff going on at the same time.
    Lots of disasters happened to me along the way leading to my current state.

    That aside. Melasma. Did you know it is not just a pigment disorder? It actually has a vascular component.
    Here is one article which speaks about it.
    https://www.mdedge.com/edermatologyn...ponent-melasma

    I battled the hideous mess for years and it ruined my life. Trying to treat Rosacea on a background of melasma is a nightmare.

    Later on in years, I discovered I was iodine deficient and supplementation finally rid me of the remnants of the pigmentation issue. I do realise it could still be lurking beneath the skin.

    In addition, pigment issues are often connected to thyroid dysfunction. I went on to develop Hashimoto's disease during the time I was iodine deficient, but hashi's is a complex disease and has many other contributing factors.

    Currently I am completely free of melasma, but struggle to completely rid myself of rosacea and flushing, although for a couple of years, I was in a pretty decent state.

    Oral and topical niacinamide (which I take/use), are also beneficial for alleviating melasma. Melasma has an oxidative stress factor which the above help alleviate. I take oral vitamin C, but don't use it topically due to irritation.

    I also use ZZ cream, which I mix with my niacinamide gel and that helps calm and control my subtype 1 rosacea/flushing. I expect it helps with controlling pigment too.

    High dose oral vitamin C, moderate zinc and gut antimicrobials have brought about a reduction of melasma in a number of other women. A quick google should lead you to them.

    Another thing you might consider is elevating your glutathione levels with NAC. Around 200mg. Any more might cause flushing.
    Glutathione is considered a master antioxidant and could help relieve both your melasma and rosacea.

    Of course, the above treatments take a fairly long time to work, but I do believe they have merit. I have spent decades researching the subject and applying different methods.

    IPL can make melasma much worse and progressive. Been there, done that.

    Based on what you say, I suspect you do have a form of rosacea/flushing.

    Hi Mistica!

    How can one tell if the red patches are melasma or rosacea induced erythema? Also, what is the brand of your niacinanide gel?

    Thanks in advance!
    MissM

  4. #4
    Senior Member Mistica's Avatar
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    Hi Mistica!

    How can one tell if the red patches are melasma or rosacea induced erythema? Also, what is the brand of your niacinanide gel?

    Thanks in advance!
    MissM
    Melasma = brown hyperpigmentation.
    Rosacea alone does not involve increased pigment.

    The 4% niacinamide gel I purchase is compounded by a pharmacist in Sydney Australia. I'll link his website, but unfortunately I don't think he ships overseas.
    For those that live in Australia, they can purchase the gel on line. It goes by the name 'acne gel', but this version also contains lipoic acid which can be irritating to sensitive skins.
    Therefore I order over the phone and get my order compounded without the Lipoic acid.
    In addition, I will mention again, as I have in the past, the particular 'light cellulose' gel vehicle is just as important as the niacinamide. I don't know what the exact formula is and the pharmacist won't tell you. I can tell you, that no other vehicle suits me. This stuff shrinks as it dries, but remains elastic and flexible, leaves a very slight film on the surface of the skin which calms it. There are no PUFA's in the gel, or any other oily irritating stuff.

    https://custommedicine.com.au/
    Previous Numerous IPL.
    Supplements: Niacinamide, Vit K2, low D3, Vit A. Moderate Dose Vit C, Iodine, Taurine, Magnesium. Very low dose B's. Low dose zinc (to correct deficiency).
    Skin Care: No Cleanser, ZZ cream mixed with Niacinamide gel 4% and LMW HA 2%, ethyl ascorbate 2%.

    Treating for gut dysbiosis.(This is helping).
    Previous GAPS diet. Have now introduced lots of fibre.
    Fermented Foods. Intermittent fasting -16-18 hours.
    Oral Colostrum. Helps reduce food reactions.

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