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Thread: has anyone tried oat groat?

  1. #21
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    I'm curious to see if whole-grain oat flour will have a similar effect, since it's conveniently in powdered form already which means it'd be much easier to apply and wash off. This might be dependent on the supplier, but from what I gather the whole-grain flour is made simply by milling the oat groats, without any steaming process involved. Trying it out will only set me back a couple of £ so why not.

    I haven't applied the mask since the weekend but there's still a lot of dead skin and flaking. I might try the mask with the whole-grain oat flour this weekend, but I want to continue spacing out applications.

    Chitinases have a significant function in human health care. An important medical use for chitinases has also been recommended in augmenting the activity of anti-fungal drugs in therapy for fungal diseases. Due to their topical applications, they have a prospective use in anti-fungal creams and lotions.
    Source: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3612335/

    Room temperature water extracts of uncooked oats have been shown to have a significant ability to inhibit fungal growth when applied to rye bread as a food preservative. The method of action is the presence of a chitinase enzyme with activity that is at least 10 times more abundant in oat extracts (Avena sativa) than from other grains. Oat chitinase enzyme activity is deactivated by heating. Optimal chitinase enzyme pH is 7.0 with a loss of 80% of activity at a pH of 8.0 yet only a loss of 40% of activity at a pH of 4.0.
    Source: http://www.truehealthmedicine.com/pt...ds/rawoats.pdf

  2. #22
    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
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    Good idea sejon, it may not matter if it's ground into flour. I've been applying ground, non-sproutable, oat groats (which I posted about previously) and they are working fine to exfoliate the extra layer of keratin on my feet -- this is at least an indication that it's not necessary to use sproutable oat groats.

    I did an A-B test this morning, where I ground the oat groats in a coffee grinder, as usual, for 10 seconds, but then added vodka instead of water, on the theory that ethanol would denature (reduce or eliminate) the chitinase enzymes in oat groats. I'll report back in a day or 2.

    I've been using oat groats every other day previously, so I have a rough baseline for comparison as to whether the exfoliation is due to chitinase, or whether it's simply mechanical exfoliation from the grittiness of ground oat groats. I can easily see how much keratin is stuck to the inside of my black socks, and roughly see how much keratin is flaking off. Hardly a lab test, but it's all I've got.

    Your test with fine-grind oat flour will be another way to see if the softer oat flour (compared to grittier ground groats) will make the same amount of difference, or more, or less.

  3. #23
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    Hi Tom, I don't think it's due to the gritty texture of the oat paste, because I'm very lightly patting it on the skin and being very careful not to rub. This leads me to believe that the resulting exfoliation is chemical (enzymatic) rather than mechanical. Of course, when I have to rinse it off I can't be so gentle, but I noticed that the keratinised "shell" is softened almost immediately upon application of the oat paste.

    Having used both mechanical methods of exfoliation (e.g. a konjac sponge), and acidic methods (hydroxy acids like salicylic and mandelic acid), neither of which I've found to be effective against the "shell", the (presumably enzymatic) exfoliation with oats has had much more promising results. Hydroxy acids are excellent at managing my acne, though, but they haven't done much for my seb derm.

    Please do report back on your experiment -- it would be a step forward in figuring out what the mechanism of action is here. I believe it's ultimately down to the chitinase.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
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    Hi sejon, this site explains how oats are prepared before milling: http://www.namamillers.org/education...lling-process/
    ďIn the conditioning process, moisture content is increased before the groats pass through a kiln where they are heated using dry heat radiators to a temperature of approximately 215 degrees F. During the heating process, steam inactivates enzymes present in raw grain, the groats are given a roasted nutty flavor, starch gelatinization occurs, and moisture level is reduced to a point acceptable for product storage.Ē

    My experiment, using vodka to inactivate the enzymes, resulted in a marked reduction in exfoliation -- this supports the idea that chitinase is the primary feature of topical oat groats.

  5. #25
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    Thanks for the info and your input, Tom. Arg, I thought I was being clever with the idea of using the whole-grain flour, but clearly there are no cutting corners with this, as thereís no suitable alternative to the raw oat groats.

    In that case Iíll have a go grinding them up in a coffee grinder in the next few days and will report back on how it goes.

    The efficacy of chitinase is remarkable, just a pity the only form available to us is such a messy one!

  6. #26
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    Default Oat groat contains salicylic acid

    Sejon,

    I did some research and both aloe and oat groats contain salicylic acid. The references I read didnít say what percent so it could be a small amount possibly. I wonder if there is a high enough amount that you are basically giving yourself a chemical peel.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=vH...20acid&f=false

    Are you still using Eucerins Replenishing Cream. I just received it from the UK but the ingredients are different from eucerins website and different from the one referenced on simpleskincarescience.com. I was happy to see that there is no lanolin because demodex can metabolize lanolin not sure if lanolin alcohol makes it inedible to them. I really want to try a urea face cream that is both demodex safe and malassezia safe. Iím waiting for sebamed Urea cream but it has fragrance so it could be irritating. Europe particularly Germany & Scandinavia seems to offer many urea face creams. Which face cream are you using?

    I use cerave cream but it doesnít spread or absorb well particularly my mustache area. Cerave pm is too shiny looking.

    Back to oats. I did wonder if after you grind up the groats you mixed in some colloidal oatmeal (aveeno bath) to sooth the skin. I also find that the mustache area is

  7. #27
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    I did some research and both aloe and oat groats contain salicylic acid. The references I read didnít say what percent so it could be a small amount possibly. I wonder if there is a high enough amount that you are basically giving yourself a chemical peel.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=vH...20acid&f=false
    I have a long history of using salicylic acid exfoliants -- usually between 1-2% concentrations, which are assuredly much higher than whatever negligible amounts are in aloe and oat groats. I've also applied peel-strength amounts of mandelic acid. I am extremely confident that the effect of the oat groats and aloe are not because of any acid content, since the hydroxy acids I've used in much higher concentrations did not have these effects.

    Are you still using Eucerins Replenishing Cream. I just received it from the UK but the ingredients are different from eucerins website and different from the one referenced on simpleskincarescience.com. I was happy to see that there is no lanolin because demodex can metabolize lanolin not sure if lanolin alcohol makes it inedible to them. I really want to try a urea face cream that is both demodex safe and malassezia safe. Iím waiting for sebamed Urea cream but it has fragrance so it could be irritating. Europe particularly Germany & Scandinavia seems to offer many urea face creams. Which face cream are you using?
    I've been using the Eucerin cream you mention for about half of a year and like it. It is quite lightweight but also very moisturising due to the high urea content, which helps treat the tight, dehydrated feeling my skin sometimes has. Personally I haven't found it to exacerbate my SD, but when I apply it I mainly focus on the dry areas of my face, where I don't have SD symptoms. I've tried several kinds of Cerave creams but they all cause congestion and break me out in varying degrees; however their Healing Ointment doesn't and works great mixed with a cream moisturiser (like the Eucerin one), but it's very greasy so I apply it only at night before bed.

  8. #28
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    I appreciate the response. I did assume the salicylic content to be pretty small. Interestingly enough in Germany they recommend oat grass (not colloidal or groats) soaks for seborrheic Dermatitis.

    The eucerin Cream you use comes in a tube and lacks lanolin alcohol. The one I received has different ingredients then eucerins website.

  9. #29
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    im trying the oat groats method as we speak - got some organic ones that ive ground in a coffee blender and mixed with water . its very messy and hard to apply !

    my question is - once the oats are ground down is the active ingredient still in the oats or is it extracted into the water used to make a paste ? if its extracted it might be easier to filter it out and mix with something like honey to make it easier to apply ?

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by boris View Post
    my question is - once the oats are ground down is the active ingredient still in the oats or is it extracted into the water used to make a paste ? if its extracted it might be easier to filter it out and mix with something like honey to make it easier to apply ?
    Hi Boris, it's a good question and I wish I knew the answer as that would make it easier! I think the only way to find out would be to try the mask with the oats filtered out, and observe if it has the same effect as it would without the oats being filtered.

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