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Thread: has anyone tried oat groat?

  1. #11
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    I did last summer. At the time is was experimenting as didn't know if I had yeast or demodex issue.
    I made a mix with organic gluten free oats mixed with organic sea salt & lavender oil & grinded. Used cooled boiled water to make a paste & Put it on as a mask and then washed it off (exfoliation motion). First time skin felt good after. Next time I developed tiny itchy stingy pimples. So I stopped. It felt like I had irritated the skin & caused a bactrical infection. Shame I know oats have such good properties - potentially a brilliant skin mask/scrub . Perhaps I wasn't hygienic enough in my method or left it on too long - just a thought.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
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    An update about sprouting hulless oat seeds -- Sprouthouse oat seeds do not sprout at all. I emailed Sprouthouse about this problem, and she said she thought that hulless oats never sprout. Hah. That's a completely false idea. If they didn't sprout then there would never be hulless oat-plants growing in the ground. Sprouthouse oats are probably heated and killed for easier storage. And, this vendor completely mislabeled the oats as "non-GMO Sprouting Oat Seeds." Yikes.

    Then I bought some hulless oat seeds from Sprout People, and these sprouted.

    Just soak the seeds in tap water for 6 to 8 hours, rinse, and then rinse them 2 or 3 times a day. After 5 days, the sprouts are ready to eat. Very tasty and nutritious.

    Brian Severson Farms appears to be a good source too, for larger quantities.

  3. #13
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    I bought a kilo of organic oat groats and intend to try out this mask soon.

    I'll puree the oat groats in the blender with water. I was considering adding kefir also, but I don't know if kefir will somehow neutralise the enzymes, thus rendering the whole venture pointless, so probably it's best to try with just water first to assess whether it makes a difference.

    I regularly eat oatmeal with kefir for breakfast, so the thought of using a mask that is essentially my breakfast is a bit poetic.

    Even if the experiment is a failure from the standpoint of treating SD, the oats should at least calm inflammation. And, worst case scenario, the rest of the oat groats can be incorporated into my breakfast!

  4. #14
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    I did the mask this morning. Here are my first impressions:

    I blended 2 parts water to 1 part oat groats, but the mixture was too watery, in my opinion. Next time I'll blend them in equal parts.

    I used a blender, which was a bit sloppy and slapdash. I think a coffee/spice grinder is better suited for this, but I don't have one -- maybe if this becomes a regular thing for me I'll consider getting one. I do like freshly grounded coffee, anyway!

    When applying it to my face, I noticed that upon immediate contact with my SD-affected areas, the oat mask "exposes" the layer of hyper-keratinised skin (some consider it to be a fungal biofilm though apparently that's still debatable). In other words, that extra layer of skin, which is usually visually indistinguishable from the rest of my skin (aside from the fact that it tends to flake) suddenly becomes visible and is substantially softened, to the point that I can just start pulling off small, diaphanous sheets of it with a pair of tweezers. In some parts the extra skin layer comes off with a texture that reminds me of a spider web (stringy, sticky, and, well, silken obviously).

    In my experience the only other substance that has a similar softening effect is pure aloe vera gel, although the oat mask's effect appears to be more dramatic. Moreover, if the chitinase in the oat groats can dissolve fungal cell walls then it's doing double duty, whereas I don't believe aloe vera has any inhibitory effect on Malassezia (I wish it did, because that would be incredibly convenient).

    I'll do the mask daily just for the next few days and report back, although I might space out its use more if it starts to dry out my skin too much.

  5. #15
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    I apologise for the grossness of these photos, but here's what die-off looks like:

    IMG_2686.jpg
    IMG_2691.jpg

    Here's a curious trick I learnt: if you have applied a treatment that you suspect might have caused a disruption to the fungal colonies (in this case, purportedly the chitinase from the ground oat groats), you can follow up with applying a generous amount of pure aloe vera gel to rapidly expose the die-off.

    Under normal circumstances, applying aloe vera gel will just absorb into the skin and leave it feeling slightly tacky. Anyone who has used it overzealously to heal a sunburn, for instance, would be aware of this (on that note, always use sun protection, folks).

    However, I've noticed that if I've applied something that has successfully treated a Malassezia condition, applying a generous amount of pure aloe vera gel (e.g. half a finger length, or even a whole finger length) afterward to the affected areas will very dramatically speed up the separation of the extra layer of hyper-keratinised skin from the rest of your skin. It takes about a half hour after applying it for the skin to start feeling extremely taut and dry. If you then look in the mirror and still don't see any visible separation, but your skin has this sensation of tightness, you can simply move around and stretch the various muscles in your face (such as moving your jaw from side to side), as this will cause tears in the separate layer and make it very visible. This is precisely what I did before taking these photos, which show the result.

    I don't know what's so special about aloe vera gel that causes it to interact with the hyper-keratinised layer in this way, but once again, it is only highly effective in doing this if you've pre-treated the area with something that has a very strong anti-fungal activity.

    Anyway, this is reason to believe that the ground oat groats mask method does indeed show promise. So I guess I'll be getting myself a coffee grinder and continuing!

  6. #16
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    How long did you leave the mask on? Was there any discomfort while it was on your skin? Were you able to remove all that dead skin?

  7. #17
    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
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    Sejon that's an amazing result! Thanks!

    I had to try this to see what happened and the results are very interesting. I strongly suggest others try oat groats topically.

    I made 1/3rd cup of ground oat groats with 1/3rd cup of boiled, cooled water and applied it over my entire body. This is extremely messy, and you can only do this standing in a shower. When the oat groats dried, I repeatedly re-wetted my hands and kept the mix wet for 15 minutes, massaged repeatedly, and rinsed off in the shower, and then washed with my usual sodium hyaluronate/climbazole/piroctone olamine shampoo, towel dried, and then applied my usual sodium hyaluronate/climbazole/piroctone olamine lotion.

    The result is that the chitin in the oat groats left a stable waxy residue, which also exfoliates slightly, and feels very different, with an obvious, waxy, tactile sense that remains on the skin, even after being washed off and lotion added.

    Chitin is the principal reason why the exoskeletons of marine crustaceans don't dissolve in salt water, so I strongly suspect this is a breakthrough for people with an excess of keratin in response to irritation. I suspect TEWL (trans-epidermal water loss) will be reduced by adding chitin in this manner, because of the thin waxy layer remaining on the skin. TEWL may be the root problem, or at least one of the problems, causing an excess of keratin to develop.

    Obviously Rome wasn't built in a day, but this simple solution seems to hold a lot of potential.

  8. #18
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    I applied another generous amount of aloe vera gel before bed last night, and this morning I was able to pull off sheets of skin from my chin with tweezers -- it peeled off in a way reminiscent of skin peeling from a sunburn.

    I then applied another mask, although I've found that equal parts of oat groats and water makes it too thick, and a lot messier, and it was considerably more difficult to wash off. But once again, it is clear that it dissolves the extra layers of keratinised skin (which I've dubbed the "Shell" for the sake of simplicity) almost immediately upon contact. I've never encountered a treatment that has such quick and dramatic results.

    How long did you leave the mask on? Was there any discomfort while it was on your skin? Were you able to remove all that dead skin?
    I leave it on for about 15 minutes, but honestly, I think it might not require that much time. I'm going to try shorter timespans, because it would be considerably easier to rinse off the oat mask before it's had enough time to dry. Indeed it might require so little contact time that this could effectively be used as a wash rather than a mask, i.e. left on the skin for maybe just 30 seconds, but I'll need to test that theory, obviously.

    The oat mask is actually moisturising (oats are known to have this effect which is why they're often found as an ingredient in moisturisers, like the ones from Aveeno), but its moisturising properties are counteracted by the fact that the mask is left on until it dries, and it requires a lot of over-washing to remove. I believe this can be resolved by reducing the contact time, and making adjustments to how I make the mask. I think once I have a coffee grinder and can grind it into a powder it'll be a lot easier to work with.

    The dead skin took a lot of time to remove, but I managed to do so. I'm having more to contend with after today's mask, though. After this I might take a break for a while (at least until I get a coffee grinder) because I want to actually be able to go out this weekend and not have my face looking like a peeling mess. Basically this method is too effective and I need to space out the treatments.

    Tom, I can't imagine applying this as a full body treatment, I make enough of a mess just with my face! I think if this does turn out to be as groundbreaking a treatment as it appears to be, doing a weekly oat mask as maintenance isn't unreasonable (and it helps that it's very cost-effective, too).

  9. #19
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    Default Demodex also has a chitin shell

    If this oat groat mask or cleanser is able to seep into pores it might work for demodex as well. Just like fungus demodex’s shell is composed of chitin and can be dissolved by chitinase.

    “Their outer chitin layer was ruptured using chitinase”

    http://www.jarvm.com/articles/Vol8Is...0Iss1Toops.pdf

    Seems that that people with demodex have elevated chitinase which is part of the inflammation in their skin.

  10. #20
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    The oat mask remains on the skin surface, so I doubt it would have any effect on demodex mites, which reside within the pores. Fungal colonies are more superficial. But it's good to know that chitinase could inhibit demodex also, if there were a way to expose the mites directly to it.

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