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Thread: has anyone tried oat groat?

  1. #1
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    Default has anyone tried oat groat?

    i've only seen one post about this. apparently oat groat has chitinase and can kill yeasts.
    this is the only post i've seen about oat groat from curezone.. anyone tried this?





    I have a cure to report that worked quickly for me.

    Get yourself some oat groats.

    The reason is oats naturally contain 'chitinase', an enzyme that breaks down the cell wall of yeasts and fungi.

    Unfortunately the steam process used to make rolled oats or oatmeal destroys this enzyme, so you can't substitute oatmeal, you do have to get oat groats.

    Oat groats are available from Bob's Red Mill

    Steel cut oats may also work if you can't find groats.

    Anyway, once you've got your raw oat groats (they look like seeds), put about 1/4 cup into a blender with about 1/2 cup of water and puree it. The amount of water can vary, it's not that critical. Just make sure you are able to puree your groats.

    Put the resulting paste on the affected areas and allow to dy.

    This will have two effects, it will pull the excess oil out of your skin AND the chitinase will kill the yeast that is feeding on the oil.

    In my case it got rid of my Seborrheic Dermatitis in two days. I applied a few times a day for two days, leaving it on for about fifteen minutes each time. Don't leave it on too long or you may dry your skin too much.

    I noticed skin flaking as the dermatitis resolved, I believe this is normal during healing. After a few days the flakes went away and haven't returned.

    I also noticed that a lot of people report using Aveeno oatmeal cream. Maybe this is why that cream helps?

    Also if you are thinking of taking internally this to treat candida, it will work but start super slow! It is so effective that it can cause a severe die off reaction.

  2. #2
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    Default Very Soothing

    Quote Originally Posted by butler View Post
    i've only seen one post about this. apparently oat groat has chitinase and can kill yeasts.
    this is the only post i've seen about oat groat from curezone.. anyone tried this?

    I have tried Oat Groats as a paste on my face fro three days. I love it. It is very calming. Thanks. I will keep you posted



    I have a cure to report that worked quickly for me.

    Get yourself some oat groats.

    The reason is oats naturally contain 'chitinase', an enzyme that breaks down the cell wall of yeasts and fungi.

    Unfortunately the steam process used to make rolled oats or oatmeal destroys this enzyme, so you can't substitute oatmeal, you do have to get oat groats.

    Oat groats are available from Bob's Red Mill

    Steel cut oats may also work if you can't find groats.

    Anyway, once you've got your raw oat groats (they look like seeds), put about 1/4 cup into a blender with about 1/2 cup of water and puree it. The amount of water can vary, it's not that critical. Just make sure you are able to puree your groats.

    Put the resulting paste on the affected areas and allow to dy.

    This will have two effects, it will pull the excess oil out of your skin AND the chitinase will kill the yeast that is feeding on the oil.

    In my case it got rid of my Seborrheic Dermatitis in two days. I applied a few times a day for two days, leaving it on for about fifteen minutes each time. Don't leave it on too long or you may dry your skin too much.

    I noticed skin flaking as the dermatitis resolved, I believe this is normal during healing. After a few days the flakes went away and haven't returned.

    I also noticed that a lot of people report using Aveeno oatmeal cream. Maybe this is why that cream helps?

    Also if you are thinking of taking internally this to treat candida, it will work but start super slow! It is so effective that it can cause a severe die off reaction.

  3. #3
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    How interesting. I just ordered steel cut oats and will try to mix it with water and report back

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by butler View Post
    i've only seen one post about this. apparently oat groat has chitinase and can kill yeasts.
    this is the only post i've seen about oat groat from curezone.. anyone tried this?





    I have a cure to report that worked quickly for me.

    Get yourself some oat groats.

    The reason is oats naturally contain 'chitinase', an enzyme that breaks down the cell wall of yeasts and fungi.

    Unfortunately the steam process used to make rolled oats or oatmeal destroys this enzyme, so you can't substitute oatmeal, you do have to get oat groats.

    Oat groats are available from Bob's Red Mill

    Steel cut oats may also work if you can't find groats.

    Anyway, once you've got your raw oat groats (they look like seeds), put about 1/4 cup into a blender with about 1/2 cup of water and puree it. The amount of water can vary, it's not that critical. Just make sure you are able to puree your groats.

    Put the resulting paste on the affected areas and allow to dy.

    This will have two effects, it will pull the excess oil out of your skin AND the chitinase will kill the yeast that is feeding on the oil.

    In my case it got rid of my Seborrheic Dermatitis in two days. I applied a few times a day for two days, leaving it on for about fifteen minutes each time. Don't leave it on too long or you may dry your skin too much.

    I noticed skin flaking as the dermatitis resolved, I believe this is normal during healing. After a few days the flakes went away and haven't returned.

    I also noticed that a lot of people report using Aveeno oatmeal cream. Maybe this is why that cream helps?

    Also if you are thinking of taking internally this to treat candida, it will work but start super slow! It is so effective that it can cause a severe die off reaction.
    This reaction you are speaking of, what is that? And how slow should one start?

  5. #5
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    Interesting observations! I'm curious if colloidal oatmeal powder (for example this one on Amazon) would have a similar effect, because I had at one point considered incorporating it into a DIY mask recipe mixed with raw honey and water. At the time I had just thought of it for its calmative properties, but it's encouraging to know that oatmeal might even be more useful than I had previously thought.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
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    The important issue with oatmeal groats is that they're not heated or kilned -- they must be living seeds.

    I suspect that oatmeal powders are heated as part of the sterilization and grinding process, but you'd have to inquire of the vendor to be certain. I also suspect that steel cut oatmeal is dried via heating, but that's just my best guess. The heating and/or drying process is likely to greatly reduce the chitinase, because it's an enzyme.

    Accordingly, steel cut oats and oat groats are the same only for dietary purposes -- I suspect they may be very different from an enzymatic point of view.

    Here's some more information about the qualities of oatmeal groats:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4530573/ , http://www.truehealthmedicine.com/pt...ds/rawoats.pdf , https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19224400 .

    Chitinase breaks down chitin, which is a major component of the exoskeleton of mites, and of the cell wall of fungi. Hence, the topical use of oatmeal groats makes sense.

  7. #7
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    Thanks for the input, Tom. That makes a lot of sense, that buying the rawest form would have more of a guarantee that the enzymes are intact. It also saves money to just buy the whole oat groats and blend them myself.

    I had initially come across colloidal oatmeal powder because of its use as an ingredient in cosmetic products like lotions, but an at-home face mask that would be washed off after about 15-30 minutes obviously doesn't require much in the way of cosmetic acceptability, so just blending oat groats myself is certainly an option in this case.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Busby View Post
    Chitinase breaks down chitin, which is a major component of the exoskeleton of mites, and of the cell wall of fungi. Hence, the topical use of oatmeal groats makes sense.
    So I should not take oat groat internally?

  9. #9
    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
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    Consuming oats is said to be very healthful -- some claim it will reduce cholesterol. However, it seems likely that dietary oats will need to be cooked, as all raw grains have far too much indigestible fiber, and cooking probably will neutralize all the enzymes, such as chitinase.

    Accordingly, dietary use of oat groats is not going to involve any chitinase, because if the cooking doesn't clobber all the enzymes, then the stomach's acids and enzymes will certainly neutralize them.

    I bought some raw oats from this vendor: https://sprouthouse.com/hulless-oats...udes-shipping/ . Hulless oats are a natural mutation of oats, where the hull is so light that it is removed with ordinary sifting and winnowing, rather than steaming and grinding.

    If you look at the FAQ section of sprouthouse.com, you'll see advice about sanitizing the raw seeds with a 1:10 ratio of bleach to water -- this is important advice for anyone who plans either to sprout the seeds or use them topically. I plan to sprout the groats for 3-4 days and add them to cold cereal for breakfast. Sprouting undoubtedly results in partial neutralization of the enzymes.

    The topical use of oat groats probably requires soaking for only 12 hours, but no one knows when the chitinase reaches its optimal concentration, and so, a lot of experimentation with soak-times and soak-conditions/temperatures is probably necessary.

    I'm not super-interested in facial poultices because the process is always too much of a mess, but I'll try the oats topically at least once and report back. I plan to mash the soaked groats in a mortar and pestle.

  10. #10
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    Any updates? Has anyone tried this yet?

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