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Thread: has anyone tried oat groat?

  1. #81
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    Yep, after my first trial with the mask, my skin became intensely dry and the lower half of my face started peeling off like a lizard, especially my typical seb derm hot-spots. But it was the nasty breakout (which I now surmise to have been a demodex die-off) that forced me to back off from it -- if the peeling had been my only concern I doubt I would have stopped the whole experiment. At the time I was concerned that the ground oat groats might have somehow been comedogenic, although it didn't make much sense to me -- it's not like a coffee grinder can grind particles small enough to block skin pores. But I was otherwise at a loss as to why my skin was breaking out from it.

    If you're noticing more dramatic results from using the coffee grinder, that supports my supposition that smaller granules = greater surface area = greater availability of chitinase. So you want the oat groats to be ground up in as fine a powder as possible.

    Well, presumably your skin can't peel like that indefinitely, so after continued applications it should subside, and, one would hope, it would then start to heal. The fact that skin can peel this intensely after exposure to something as harmless as oat groats (as opposed to, say, a chemical peel, which would be shedding the upper layers of skin because it essentially induces a trauma to it from the intense acidity) is precisely what leads me to believe that the peeling skin is actually a fungal biofilm. There's clearly something that is reacting to the chitinase, and if it isn't Malassezia, then I have no idea what else it could possibly be.

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by sejon View Post
    Yep, after my first trial with the mask, my skin became intensely dry and the lower half of my face started peeling off like a lizard, especially my typical seb derm hot-spots. But it was the nasty breakout (which I now surmise to have been a demodex die-off) that forced me to back off from it -- if the peeling had been my only concern I doubt I would have stopped the whole experiment. At the time I was concerned that the ground oat groats might have somehow been comedogenic, although it didn't make much sense to me -- it's not like a coffee grinder can grind particles small enough to block skin pores. But I was otherwise at a loss as to why my skin was breaking out from it.
    Very interesting! It sounds exactly like what is happening to me. I got my SD under somewhat of a control a few years ago when I started using Tom's lotion, but I now see that some areas just have not been "tackled". Yet. I read some time ago that Tom said something interesting, that the acid produced by the fungus supresses the demodex colony, and that in normal skin there is a balance between demodex and fungus. I might be butchering the delivery here, but I think that was the idea. The reason I mention this is because it seems that my "smile lines" (there is a big thread about redness in smile lines which I will revive if this is a success) have had both die-off (demodex?) and intense peeling (fungus?). So I wonder if I have been struggling with both demodex and Malassezia the whole time. Could this be the case?

    If you're noticing more dramatic results from using the coffee grinder, that supports my supposition that smaller granules = greater surface area = greater availability of chitinase. So you want the oat groats to be ground up in as fine a powder as possible.
    That makes sense, indeed! But note that I have diluted the one part of raw oats with 6 parts of water, so it is quite diluted. I shake it before applying it, so some "corns" tend to follow, but its mostly watery solution I put on.

    Well, presumably your skin can't peel like that indefinitely, so after continued applications it should subside, and, one would hope, it would then start to heal. The fact that skin can peel this intensely after exposure to something as harmless as oat groats (as opposed to, say, a chemical peel, which would be shedding the upper layers of skin because it essentially induces a trauma to it from the intense acidity) is precisely what leads me to believe that the peeling skin is actually a fungal biofilm. There's clearly something that is reacting to the chitinase, and if it isn't Malassezia, then I have no idea what else it could possibly be.
    If this reasoning is correct, I would be so happy. I'm aiming for total annihilation here, if that is possible. The problem is that my skin get so red after the peeling, that I can't live a normal life outside of this forum... but that is nothing new, I guess

  3. #83
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    I've applied the oat groat solution for the past 3 nights and nothing has really happened. No die-off, no flaking, nothing. I'm not sure if this is a good or bad thing. My skin seems to look a bit better though, although that could just be down to using no topical other than oat groat. I'll make a new batch today and try to grind the groats more finely. Maybe I won't try filtering, though I don't think I'll be able to leave it on overnight if I do that.

  4. #84
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    Nick_1: Maybe you have to be patient here. I used the oat groat water for several days before it "kicked in", so even though I suspect it kicked in because of grinding the oats with the coffee grinder, it might be that you just need some time as well. Not sure.

    EDIT: Sejon had a reaction after his first trial, and so did I with the grinded oat, so yes, maybe try that.
    Last edited by rednessator; 26th March 2019 at 12:09 PM.

  5. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by rednessator View Post

    EDIT: Sejon had a reaction after his first trial, and so did I with the grinded oat, so yes, maybe try that.

    Do you mean without filtering? How did you make the solution and for how long did you leave it on?

  6. #86
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    I think he got a reaction with the mask. I just do as Tom/Sejon suggested, as I've written above. I've basically put the water on in large quantities all through the day. So I've had a high exposure, to put it that way.

  7. #87
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    Got it.

    I think I might make another 6:1 solution, save the filtrate for use overnight and apply the other part throughout the day.

  8. #88
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    I had applied the ground oat groats to my face as a mask and left it on for about 15-20 minutes. I took a bath during that time because it was so messy I couldn't walk around the house while wearing it. It had a very dramatic effect -- I could see the uppermost layer of skin "lifting" off almost immediately as I applied it -- but it's not a method I'd recommend to others, or even repeat myself, because it was such an ordeal to wash off. I ended up having to scrub it off very vigorously which irritated my face in the process.

    Then the following night I applied just the water that I had mixed it with, and did notice a bit of this "lifting" of skin in some areas, but it was not nearly as dramatic as the first night.

    By the third day, my breakout was in full force so I decided to stop the experiment, and haven't tried it since. Actually, not entirely true -- one night I wanted to see what would happen if I just let the oat groats soak in water overnight, but without having ground them up at all, and applied the water from that. There was no effect whatsoever, which I had suspected would happen, but it was to test the theory that the oats needed to be ground up in order to "release" the chitinase.

    I'd be willing to experiment with this again, but it's on the back-burner for now as I want to give my current routine of treating demodex with sulfur ointment at least a couple more months.

    Nick, since you mentioned you've been using ZZ cream for the past 3 months I wouldn't expect the oat groats to cause a demodex die-off for you, or at least not much of one. If you have Malassezia dermatitis, though, I think it should induce peeling in these areas quite soon if it hasn't already.

  9. #89
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    Quote Originally Posted by sejon View Post

    Nick, since you mentioned you've been using ZZ cream for the past 3 months I wouldn't expect the oat groats to cause a demodex die-off for you, or at least not much of one. If you have Malassezia dermatitis, though, I think it should induce peeling in these areas quite soon if it hasn't already.
    I've actually used ZZ cream for over 4 months, but have been treating demodex for longer. The day before I applied an oat groat solution for the first time I actually had a couple of bumps appear. I've surely been treating demodex long enough now that I think a decent assumption to make is that there is something in ZZ cream that doesn't agree with my skin and causes breakouts.

    Earlier today I used the non-filtrate that I stored in the fridge along with the filtrate as a mask for 20 minutes. I don't know if I did something wrong at some point but I found it easy to wash off with just water. Also, when I scraped my fingernail across my skin it was very flaky. I don't know if this was down to the way in which the solution dried on my face or I was scraping off the biofilm. I applied some to the back of my hand and a similar thing happened when I scraped it off with my fingernail, though to a lesser extent. My skin clearly looked better after this mask though.

    I've just made a new solution, ensuring that the oat groats were as finely ground as possible. I'll have to try this mask again.

  10. #90
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    Nick_1: There seem to be a tiny layer of something building up, that looks like flaking, but it is really just the watery solution "coagulating", could this be true?

    Could anybody explain to be what the heck is happening when Malassezia is exposed/killed from the skin like this? Why exactly is the skin getting so red? I assume it is an immune response, that the body sees the fungus and starts "treating" it. Are there some way of mitigating the inflammation? It is so intense I look like a burn victim. I'm actually considering cortisone...

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