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Thread: Experiences with honey method? Warning signs to stop?

  1. #1
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    Default Experiences with honey method? Warning signs to stop?

    Been using the honey method for about a week as instructed (minus coconut oil. It gives me acne and I've read here it is used to grow yeast in labs.)

    My dermatitis has spread mildly and become very dry. I also have a lot more fungal pimples and scalp itch. I've gone off a daily 2% ketoconazole shampoo and replaced it with a honey cleanse as instructed.

    Is this an early stage of cleansing/drawing out pimples or a warning sign that it's simply not working?

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    I think i read that after week of using honey you will get flareup and then it will be ok

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    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
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    Honey plus coconut oil is supposed to treat keratosis pilaris, aka chicken bumps. The original poster of the honey "sticky" was treating KP -- you can go back and read the threads she posted just before her "sticky" and see the KP connection. Other than that, I don't find honey useful except to eat it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Busby View Post
    Honey plus coconut oil is supposed to treat keratosis pilaris, aka chicken bumps. The original poster of the honey "sticky" was treating KP -- you can go back and read the threads she posted just before her "sticky" and see the KP connection. Other than that, I don't find honey useful except to eat it.
    I was under the impression it worked on SD based on posts from the forum and the subreddit r/sebderm. Is there a current method that's viable for people who want to avoid steroids and have poor results with ketoconazole? Thanks for any help.

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    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
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    I'm under the impression that honey will slightly improve the skin barrier, and that's all. I trialed it for about 2 weeks, and what a mess. People that write about honey rarely identify what condition they're treating, and how they were able to identify the causative agent.

    As for other natural alternatives, there aren't any natural antifungals. For example, coconut oil is not an antifungal -- labs can use it to grow malassezia colonies in vitro, although cotton oil is better for that task.

    Fungi are eukaryotes just like us, so they harder to nuke than bacteria or viruses, without harming the human host, because all eukaryote cell walls are all nearly identical, which is how fungi evade detection by the body's immune system. Hence, the limited arsenal even for synthetic antifungals.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Busby View Post
    I'm under the impression that honey will slightly improve the skin barrier, and that's all. I trialed it for about 2 weeks, and what a mess. People that write about honey rarely identify what condition they're treating, and how they were able to identify the causative agent.

    As for other natural alternatives, there aren't any natural antifungals. For example, coconut oil is not an antifungal -- labs can use it to grow malassezia colonies in vitro, although cotton oil is better for that task.

    Fungi are eukaryotes just like us, so they harder to nuke than bacteria or viruses, without harming the human host, because all eukaryote cell walls are all nearly identical, which is how fungi evade detection by the body's immune system. Hence, the limited arsenal even for synthetic antifungals.
    So should I just stick with the ketoconazole shampoo? I don't have anything else to treat it.

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    Try dead salt sea

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    Member Senbonzakura's Avatar
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    Tom's correct, using honey for SD will only help repair the skin barrier slightly and that's all.

    I tried the honey treatment for awhile, I used to put a thin layer on before I went to sleep so it didn't get all over my pillow. It worked to an extent but nowhere near as much as you'd need it to.

    I wouldn't be against doing a weekly honey facial mask as a compliment to another regiment though!

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