Page 3 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 33

Thread: Climbazole dissolves in MCT oil

  1. #21
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    11

    Default

    I posted something yet it seems to be going through moderation?

    Anyway, brief recap with questions:

    - Skin was very clear after about 10 days of treatment, redness gone on face except eyelids and little on forehead and side of nose. Flaking and dryness mostly gone. Little intetrigo on neck
    - Stopped applying 'climbazoil' for 2-3 days as had friends over so was out drinking and having late nights a lot.
    - Now, after reapplying again I have gone through a second 'flare'. Is this normal? Skin is very flaky, dry, red, tight and sensitive. Is this a second 'die off' reaction as Malassezia has grown back or normal healing process?
    - Today, almost back to normal again. Skin very flakey but redness subsiding.
    - Will try washing glass with alchohol. Also legs to your theory Don as I live in Europe where it's around 16c at the minute.
    - Going to get some emulsifier, as it's too time consuming to heat the oil twice a day.

    Thanks

  2. #22
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Another 5 days and the flare has cleared!

    Still very flakey on eyelids, eyebrows, side of nose and moustache, but not something that isn't hidden after showering and moisturising!

    Are these cycles of flaring and healing usual?

    Thanks

  3. #23
    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,219

    Default

    Yes, you'll see dormant colonies become visible as you use a good antifungal. Apparently, about 90% of fungal colonies are dormant at any given time, and use this adaptation to evade the body's immune system. When you use an antifungal like climbazole, they become active and/or die, and either way, they excite the immune system and create inflammation, which is the visible stuff you're asking about.

    Mycota are sneaky and super-resistant to change, because Mycota are eukaryotes, like mammals are, and are harder for our immune system to recognize or nuke, compared to bacteria or viruses.

  4. #24
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Thanks Tom, very interesting stuff.

    Do you have a loose timeline of your healing process? I know you've given an overall timeline of 6 months plus but jsut wondering when the redness and flakiness reached an okay level!

    Started using the oil on different body parts as well, and seeing much the same - patches of redness and flaking.

    Am now wondering whether the cause of skin issues has always been due to Malassezia! Is there anything on the efficacy of using climazole on fungal toe nail too? Will be experimenting with that!

    Thanks again

  5. #25
    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,219

    Default

    Hi Steve, I have a timeline of the healing process posted in the "sticky," at the top of this subforum, which has all the information in the 5 or so .pdf's, near the end of each paper.

    I estimate the length of the healing process, in months, is your age in decades, times two. If you're 30, that's 6 months. If you're 50, that's 10 months. Young people have a more robust immune system, and their fungal colonies are entrenched behind thinner walls of keratin.

    As a psychological device, you can view the healing in 3 different stages. Stage 1 is where a casual observer would not notice anything wrong with your skin. Stage 2 is where another person, even on close inspection, would not notice anything wrong. Stage 3 is where you notice nothing wrong. This is suggested because people are too hard on themselves, compared to others, when it comes to skin quality.

    The toenails are very difficult to treat because the nails are super-thick walls of keratin, especially the big toenails. My big toe toenails always had a slight yellow cast, which I suppose was caused by some fungus, and they have cleared-up to a nearly normal color (compared to the other toenails) after 4 years of daily climbazole treatment. The problem was never more than an annoyance, in terms of severity, so I wasn't focused on it, but yes, climbazole appears to have an extremely slow effect against toenail fungus.

    Treating the toenails is nearly impossible, and you can find a lot of claims from manufacturers. Luliconazole is supposed to be the Holy Grail for this problem, but I don't think you can buy it anywhere except Japan -- Valeant has the license to sell it in North America, but good luck with that company. The price is going to be sky-high.

    There's also the concept of "surface active polymers," which means a particular combination of ingredients enhances penetration of the keratin. You might google this idea.

  6. #26
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    86
    Country: Great Britain

    Default

    Another observation I have made is that storing climbazoil in glass containers seem to better than plastic ones. The plastics containers (sterile) I have been using go cloudy after a week but the glass ones don't. No idea why but thought it was worth mentioning

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

  7. #27
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Posts
    51
    Country: UK

    Default

    This is what I experience also, after about 2 weeks a cloudy string forms which floats in the oil. I have tried dissolving it with a sealed jar and it didn't make any difference. So I make small 10g batches which I use up before it starts appearing.

  8. #28
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Thanks for everyone's input, have finally managed to get it to stay in solution...

    I have an embarrassing admission, I got my calculations wrong and was diluting closer to 50% at one point and later 5%. JESUS!

    No wonder I was going through these aggravated flare cycles, I feel like the skin was actually chemically burnt in some way.

    So please all, be careful! Have finally dialed down to a sane 0.5% and it stays in solution.

    @Tom - will be persevering with toenail, again thanks for the insight!

  9. #29
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    36
    Country: Sweden

    Default

    A question for Tom:

    Do you still use climbazole even though you are "past" the three stages, and if that is, how often do you use it?

  10. #30
    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    1,219

    Default

    Yes, once per day in the shower with shampoo, and then I apply lotion, both climbazole-based, because the condition is an allergic reaction to a ubiquitous fungus.

    As explained above by Steve87's experience, following the EU guidelines is critical. There are 3 papers from the EU's Cosmetic Science Committee about climbazole, and you can't use both a 2% head and scalp shampoo and a 0.5% facial lotion -- from this, I conclude that full body use of shampoo plus lotion use is limited to 0.08%, but if you have less mass than me (190 pounds) you would need to adjust according. A person on the small side of human-variety, say 120 pounds, would use 0.06%, full body, both products. An average size human, about 150 pounds, would use 0.07%.

    This variation results because skin surface area (where a tiny amount of climbazole intrudes past the skin-barrier) ratio to mass, varies with body-size.

    Of course the ratio varies with body type too (compare a thin person as a cylinder, to a heavy person as a sphere), and this is also complicated to predict. For example, if someone is extremely cylindrical or extremely spherical, you would adjust according, probably by 0.01% one way or the other, for full body use of both products. This estimate is not intended to be precise, although I think it's reasonably accurate.

    Keep in mind that all EU OTC safety ratios require a 100 to 1 safety margin for OTC cosmetics, which is in itself an arbitrary ratio that is probably accurate but not a truly precise guideline. There are some risks in this, and you want to minimize them.

    If you are using only face/neck/scalp, with both products, someone else should read the final of the three EU papers and determine if using both products at 0.5% on face/neck/scalp is actually within the 100-to-1 safety ratio. Keep in mind that if you're in the shower and using a shampoo, it's impossible to keep the suds off your body, so you should adjust the percentages, lower than 0.5%.

    I haven't tried to calculate partial body use, because my use is full body. People making their own products, I suspect, haven't done the math for their own use, and their own body size and type, and they REALLY NEED TO.

    Or, they could make both products to 0.06% climbazole, which is my recommendation. "Be safe out there today, everyone."

    And the dump in method is not ideal -- you can't be sure if you have an emulsion that's strong as to malassezia, or a dispersion (of powder) that's weak as to malassezia. The EU guidelines don't explore this difference, but it seems likely to be a strong part of the safety factor.

    Climbazole treatment is not a cure -- a cure would of necessity alter my immune system, which is very much more risky and completely unacceptable to me.

Similar Threads

  1. MCT Oil
    By sparky7ot in forum Similar and co-existing conditions
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 14th April 2017, 11:00 PM
  2. Questions about using MCT oil for SD and cleansers with SD
    By Scwosh in forum Newbie questions / Introduction
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 15th October 2016, 07:42 AM
  3. Swapping Coconut for MCT oil to improve SD
    By craven20 in forum Similar and co-existing conditions
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 2nd August 2015, 11:04 PM
  4. Does MCT Oil kill Malassezia?
    By rednessator in forum Newbie questions / Introduction
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 12th May 2015, 04:39 PM
  5. hemp oil mct oil and malassezia seb derm
    By ༼ ༎ຶ ෴ ༎ຶ༽ in forum Similar and co-existing conditions
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 7th December 2014, 07:49 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •