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Thread: Loss of Sweating

  1. #1
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    Default Loss of Sweating

    In the beginning my skin would flush horribly and get terribly hot, and yet not sweat at all. There came a point when it began to sweat and cool itself off some when I flushed. I rarely get flushing now, but when I do, it seems like it has gone back to not sweating at all, even though it feels intensely hot. Does anyone else have this? Any suggestions as to why this happens or how to make the skin healthier and better able to cool itself down.

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    Thumbs up experienced

    Darling

    This problem experienced by a lot of people you are not the first and you are not Being the last
    The most serious problem is the poor handling of the problem
    I advise you to first consult a medical You stay away from synthetic plastic materials and the use of natural materials





    If my understanding did not ask me, I will be available to respond to your questions

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    Senior Member nat007's Avatar
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    Not sure if you are interested in reading a blog post about this topic, but I tried to find out more about lack of sweating versus facial flushing too, some time ago.
    http://scarletnat.blogspot.nl/2013/1...-sweating.html

    Hope it helps. You can increase sweating with exercise (I do a lot of high tempo walking, it doesn't make me too flushed usually, I bring iced water too and walk when the sun is down and there is a bit of a breeze). Many people find that when they sweat a bit more, the skin can actually look better. Sweating is the body's natural cooling mechanism and when for whatever reason the sweating stops or slows down, another way of losing heat is through dilation of the blood vessels, unfortunately :/

    Oh, and you can try spraying your face with a water spray, or Avene thermal water spray. That way, you mimic the bodies natural sweating mechanism a little bit and your skin cools off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nat007 View Post
    Not sure if you are interested in reading a blog post about this topic, but I tried to find out more about lack of sweating versus facial flushing too, some time ago.
    http://scarletnat.blogspot.nl/2013/1...-sweating.html

    Hope it helps. You can increase sweating with exercise (I do a lot of high tempo walking, it doesn't make me too flushed usually, I bring iced water too and walk when the sun is down and there is a bit of a breeze). Many people find that when they sweat a bit more, the skin can actually look better. Sweating is the body's natural cooling mechanism and when for whatever reason the sweating stops or slows down, another way of losing heat is through dilation of the blood vessels, unfortunately :/

    Oh, and you can try spraying your face with a water spray, or Avene thermal water spray. That way, you mimic the bodies natural sweating mechanism a little bit and your skin cools off.
    Luckily, I can be quite a bit active before I flush. It mainly only happens when a room is too warm or it's too warm outside and such. So do you mean that by exercising more it could restore that natural response in other circumstances of cooling the skin down on it's own by sweating? The water spray idea is a good idea too. Thank you for responding.

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    Senior Member nat007's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by moonfire241 View Post
    Luckily, I can be quite a bit active before I flush. It mainly only happens when a room is too warm or it's too warm outside and such. So do you mean that by exercising more it could restore that natural response in other circumstances of cooling the skin down on it's own by sweating? The water spray idea is a good idea too. Thank you for responding.
    It's quite a personal thing, one person with rosacea has skin improvement from regular exercise, another might make matters worse with it. In general, if you can exercise without ballooning all red, that's great. Increased heart rate, endorphins and the other benefits from being active can help keep skin in good shape too.

    A complete lack of sweating can sometimes give even people with no rosacea or skin issues a red flared face. If someone can sweat properly, that's one way of the body to reduce body temperature, and reduced body temperature is usually a good thing for facial flushing and burning. And if your face burns and you spray cool water mist on it, the hot skin can get rid of some of the heat through the water drops (like normally your sweat does in a way).

    Sometimes an inflammatory skin condition can alter normal skin barrier function; makes the skin thinner, less able to protect against irritants so more sensitive, and sometimes it also seems to affect normal skin shedding and sweating. I don't know how that works exactly, but sweating has a cooling function for the body so not sweating anymore can add to the problem of overheating..

    Hope this helps

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    Default a bit of an aside

    My face always turned quite red with exercise when I was a kid and I was embarrassed about it thinking it was because I was out of shape. Now I am noticing that all the blondes on both my daughters' cross country teams faces turn red after they run, even the ones that are the very fast and obviously well conditioned. What is it about fair skinned people that makes this happen? And are these kids sweating as much as the darker ones that aren't turning red? Is it actually abnormal or something to expect if you are fair-skinned?

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    Quote Originally Posted by lwemm View Post
    My face always turned quite red with exercise when I was a kid and I was embarrassed about it thinking it was because I was out of shape. Now I am noticing that all the blondes on both my daughters' cross country teams faces turn red after they run, even the ones that are the very fast and obviously well conditioned. What is it about fair skinned people that makes this happen? And are these kids sweating as much as the darker ones that aren't turning red? Is it actually abnormal or something to expect if you are fair-skinned?
    Not sure, it most likely hasn't has that much to do with lack of sweating for them. I'm from north-western Europe and also see many pale skinned/fair haired people with red cheeks in winter, when it's cold. Or when they jog outside.

    Caucasian skin tends to be thinner than dark skin. It also has less pigment/melanin than darker skin, and also is more prone to being sensitive and dry, and less sturdy. When you have thinner skin, the blood vessels lie closer to the surface, and because the skin is so fair, it also shows the blood vessel dilation a lot more than dark skin.

    It could just be that the exercise gives the kids in your daughters cross country club a healthy glow. Exercise dilates blood vessels and increases blood volume. With normal skin, the skin goes back to pale once exercise is stopped, and the blush doesn't burn normally. With rosacea however, the blood vessels can stay dilated abnormally (making you unnaturally red) for a long time afterwards, giving that burning flushing problem.

    Hope this helps

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    I can confirm both the oral and topical application of the following is very effective for excessive sweating: http://www.pharmacy.ca/cgi-bin/produ...ating&active=6

    realwork

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    Quote Originally Posted by nat007 View Post
    It's quite a personal thing, one person with rosacea has skin improvement from regular exercise, another might make matters worse with it. In general, if you can exercise without ballooning all red, that's great. Increased heart rate, endorphins and the other benefits from being active can help keep skin in good shape too.

    A complete lack of sweating can sometimes give even people with no rosacea or skin issues a red flared face. If someone can sweat properly, that's one way of the body to reduce body temperature, and reduced body temperature is usually a good thing for facial flushing and burning. And if your face burns and you spray cool water mist on it, the hot skin can get rid of some of the heat through the water drops (like normally your sweat does in a way).

    Sometimes an inflammatory skin condition can alter normal skin barrier function; makes the skin thinner, less able to protect against irritants so more sensitive, and sometimes it also seems to affect normal skin shedding and sweating. I don't know how that works exactly, but sweating has a cooling function for the body so not sweating anymore can add to the problem of overheating..

    Hope this helps
    Thanks for your reply. I always think this is odd. When I first begin to exert myself, my skin will turn red (but usually not flush), but after I'm doing it for a little bit, my skin actually starts to look more of a normal beige color than it does when I'm just sitting still. I thought maybe I was just sensitive to cold, but just warm air doesn't do it. That makes it worse. It's only when I'm moving around a lot.

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    I think that I just solved my own mystery. My thyroid is currently underactive, where it didn't used to be. I just read that a loss of sweating and dry mouth can be symptoms of hypothyroidism. Sharing for anyone who may be helped by this in case it happens to anyone else. It's something to consider. It also said that it makes the skin very dry and flaky. I've been having all of these problems.

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