Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 50

Thread: Orange LED therapy

  1. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    338

    Default

    How about this. I can get a couple more units on Amazon and evaluate them for wavelength and Illuminance. You can then make a more informed decision.

    For a better comparison, what is really needed is the measurements from a doctors office unit. If rosacea27 (or anyone else) can address that, then it would be valuable. What is needed is a better database. I can explain to anyone how to do the measurement. It is simple, just PM me.

    At this point, we can build a database for the community. This is something that has long been needed, but we have just not been focused enough to do so.
    Last edited by wiry; 29th April 2015 at 06:08 PM.

  2. #32
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    232
    Country: Canada

    Default

    Wiry, you would do that for me/us??? Are you sure? If you are indeed sure that is immensely kind of you! I have an appointment with my derm next week - May 6th I believe. This is the link to what her spa offers in terms of LED. http://www.gidonaesthetics.com/led-photomodulation.htm.

    As you can see it does not offer any kind of details in terms of hertz or voltage or mebabytes (kidding, as I do not understand the terminology!). If you could tell me what to ask for I will do so (if she does not rudely cut me off).

    Kind regards.

    wendy

  3. #33
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    338

    Default

    Yeah, its no problem. I think it finally needs to be done properly. There is just too much confusion and misinformation out there and it frustrates me. If we are ever going to progress, we need to help ourselves in a real manner.

    Here is what you do. Get a light meter on Amazon ($20)
    http://www.amazon.com/Dr-Meter-Light...dp/B004K0A7I6/

    Put it to "ON" and not "H"
    Select the appropriate multiplier for the light source. You won't know the best selection ahead of time, but you should be fine with the "100000" setting. You can also use the "20000" setting. Just be sure to give me the number that the LCD reads and the multiplier that you use. But again, the "100000" setting should be adequate.

    Next, use the "head" and point it at the light source. Make sure it is the same distance that your face would be. Don't put it right up against the light. This is important. You can move it back and forth and bit to see the variation. Let me know what those values are.

    At this point, you will have established the Illuminance (intensity of the light) and we can compare it to other units. FOR REFERENCE ONLY, expect an LCD reading of about 15-60 when the multiplier is set at "100000".

    ---

    Next is wavelength. Now, in reality you need an optical spectrometer for that. In general, these are very expensive although there are cheap DIY kits. But at the end of the day, it really doesn't matter too much. Here is why. RLT comes in 1 of 3 variations. 630nm, 660nm, and 680nm. If the light looks truly red, it is 660nm or 680nm. While I can tell the difference, you won't be able to. That is no big deal really and it is mostly likely 660nm. If the light looks more red-orange, then it is 630nm. So just look for something that is either a true red or not.

    ---

    There you have it. For $20 and a bit of knowledge you can determine what is being used. You can then compare this to the commercial units and I will provide you with the data from those (ordered already). One caveat is that if there is infrared, the light meter can not see that. However, in general, infrared is not recommended for rosacea. Most recommend, in order of preference, 680, 660, 630nm. Good luck!
    Last edited by wiry; 29th April 2015 at 10:18 PM.

  4. #34
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    338

    Default

    One minor note. If the LCD is reading less than 10 on the "100000" multiplier then switch to the "20000" multiplier. In other words, the intensity of light is quite low. This may be the case, but I would hope not. Go ahead and get familiar with the unit by putting it near a regular light bulb. Then when you get to the doctors office, you can quickly get the measurement.

  5. #35
    Senior Member IowaDavid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Iowa, U.S.
    Posts
    1,415

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wendykay View Post
    Hello Rosacea27 and IowaDavid -

    I believe that my biggest problem currently is inflammation and (due to aggressive IPL treatments) much poorer skin texture than pre-IPL. I now have enlarged pores, which look much worse in the morning or when I eat something does my rosacea does not like. I also have indentations and pores which have now formed into lines. I am considering going to my new dermatologist who offers red light therapy at $100.00 per 15 minute session. My concern is that I now also get nose swelling and so I am confened about using this on my nose.

    What I really must relieve/stop is the inflammation and thereby hope to improve the testure. Will LED red light therapy help me to achieve these results??? David, how much is your unit and does it offer other LED colours which apparently treat other issues i.e. blue LED light for acne.

    Rosacea27, which unit are you using and where did you purchase it?

    Any comments/advice would help.

    Thank you

    wendykay
    Sorry, was away and busy.

    Wendykay, you'd be much better off buying a home device than using RLT at those prices.

    If you have skin texture issues, it would be better to use infrared, but from the studies I've read, infrared is much more likely to cause bloodflow to the treated area than visible red light.

    That being said, visible red RLT can help with your skin texture issues, but it may take longer to notice a real difference.

    Wiry brings up several good points regarding standardizing measurements. The problem I've run into is that some people can't or don't tolerate RLT (though it's a minority) while others can tolerate it very well and may do better with a higher powered unit either immediately or after some time of exposure to a lower energy level. Others are fine using a middle-powered unit and this controls most of their symptoms.

    As for the other commercial units linked here, unless they are higher-powered LEDs, they don't have the density of LEDs that my device has, and you can't tell from the picture what they're output power is, obviously. I think 2 panel units are underdesigned and don't properly treat the face. You really need at least three panels.

    From what I've read about in-office LLLT devices, they do seem to be more powerful than home devices. However, they almost always use infrared, which, again, may work for some but is generally not good for rosacea. Rosacea27 appears to be using an infrared light for in-office treatments, and if he tolerates that well, that's great. I just wouldn't advise it as your first plan of action in treating your rosacea.

    I don't think I've addressed all of the issues brought up in this thread here, but you can PM me or post here if you need an answer from me. Wiry seems to be on track with his assessments, as far as I can tell.

    Best,

    David
    35 year-old male
    Erythmatotelangiectatic rosacea & Ocular
    20 + laser treatments.
    Toleraine Soothing Light Facial Fluid for moisturizer. I don't use a special cleanser. Clonidine daily; klonopin sometimes.
    BEST and CURRENT TREATMENT I use: Low-Level Red Light Therapy LED array.
    Please feel free to PM me with your low-level red light therapy (LLRLT) questions. I'm happy to help if I can.

  6. #36
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    338

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by IowaDavid View Post
    As for the other commercial units linked here, unless they are higher-powered LEDs, they don't have the density of LEDs that my device has, and you can't tell from the picture what they're output power is, obviously. I think 2 panel units are underdesigned and don't properly treat the face. You really need at least three panels.
    David
    LED output can vary tremendously though. For example, a low power LED versus a high power LED can vary by over 50X in power (actually by over 100X now). So the only way to really tell is to directly measure the units as discussed in the other thread.

    I think 2 panel units can work, but they need to be large and at the right angle (or a variable angle). But that doesn't really exist as I envision it. I am testing two units that have 2 panels. Both are undersized and will not cover the full face. The 3 panel unit I am testing is more like 1 panel + 2 half panels. It is better, but still not great. So I think the 3 panel unit you have is the best option for now, but we need to get the Illuminance measurement for comparison.

  7. #37
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Posts
    338

    Default

    .

  8. #38
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    82

    Default led stuff

    Hey Wendy,

    What Iowa David says seems to be right on par with my experience. I use his rlt religiously, but the infrared has virtually corrected all my textural issues. Knowing that, not everyone can deal with the infrared; I was one of the lucky few who could.



    Quote Originally Posted by wiry View Post
    LED output can vary tremendously though. For example, a low power LED versus a high power LED can vary by over 50X in power (actually by over 100X now). So the only way to really tell is to directly measure the units as discussed in the other thread.

    I think 2 panel units can work, but they need to be large and at the right angle (or a variable angle). But that doesn't really exist as I envision it. I am testing two units that have 2 panels. Both are undersized and will not cover the full face. The 3 panel unit I am testing is more like 1 panel + 2 half panels. It is better, but still not great. So I think the 3 panel unit you have is the best option for now, but we need to get the Illuminance measurement for comparison.

  9. #39
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    232
    Country: Canada

    Default

    Thank you Rosacea27,

    That is very helpful. Were your textural issues mainly enlarged pores?

  10. #40
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    82

    Default

    Hey Wendy,

    Yes, I had a big issue with the skin texture and large pores--the orange peel look everyone's been talking about. In fact, the LEDs with infrared have been so successful, I went ahead and had a super low level ipl yesterday. Given how low the settings were, I don't think it helped much--I wasn't even red after the treatment. However, it did give my skin a bit of a boost and it did help me feel less freaked out about ipl. Anyway, the LED also puts a lot of moisture back in the skin, both the normal red wavelength and the infrared.


    Quote Originally Posted by wendykay View Post
    Thank you Rosacea27,

    That is very helpful. Were your textural issues mainly enlarged pores?

Similar Threads

  1. LED Light Therapy Research
    By Twickle Purple in forum Low level light based therapies
    Replies: 40
    Last Post: 30th January 2018, 10:40 AM
  2. new to LED red light therapy
    By hellohello in forum Low level light based therapies
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 23rd November 2014, 12:55 AM
  3. Anyone using Yellow LED Light Therapy
    By greentree50 in forum Low level light based therapies
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 26th October 2013, 04:30 PM
  4. Led light therapy
    By grumpy69 in forum General rosacea questions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 4th November 2010, 03:38 PM
  5. Red LED Spotlights for Therapy?
    By DebInTx in forum Low level light based therapies
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 26th November 2007, 08:02 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •