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Thread: Soolantra

  1. #231
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    Quote Originally Posted by Home_Stretch View Post
    I was tested for TB and didnt have it but it was interesting because b olernaius and TB are both bacillus bacteria so one could be mistaken for one another
    But keeping in mind this was a granuloma under the skin which may appear different than a lesion on the skin.
    Mites can infest ppl with cancer and aids due to a weakened immune system.
    I had to put a lot of 2+2 together and realize demodex was probably the problem because he sure fit the profile.
    Interesting about the bacillus bacteria. The first biopsy done by first dermatologist should have been a the
    big AH-HA for the doctor but the second dermatologist is just more thorough. Its amazing that the pathologist
    and other specialists looking at the biopsy had no clue. Every time I read about weakened immune system, they
    mentioned only Leukemia. But Lymphoma is different but still a blood cancer. I don't think people with other cancers
    are as susceptible. Maybe they are but just not seeing it other than blood cancers. Thank you for responding.
    I appreciate it.

  2. #232
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    Default demodex mites and soolantra

    I have some thoughts about demodex mites and soolantra as this seems to be the newest thing for treatment of PPR (papulopustular rosacea). The following are my thoughts and humble opinions and I appreciate any and all feedback.

    My first thought has to do with the route cause of rosacea and specifically PPR. I believe for the most part that the route cause has to do with our genetics and we don't have as much melanin to combat the UV rays from the sun (us northern european people weren't meant to live in sunny places and we've destroyed our ozone layer which hasn't helped), and this has led to our skin having more blood vessels and are much more prone to inflammation. I believe that from this propensity for inflammation, many factors can contribute to exacerbation, including how our body digests foods, how the demodex mites on our (and everyone's) face react to the inflammation in our skin, etc.

    SO basically, I believe that the mites certainly play a role in the creation of P and Ps, and from reading these posts, it seems like soolantra seems to really be helping a lot of people which is encouraging. But I feel that the mites are a secondary cause of the P and Ps and not the route cause. Specifically, however they react to the inflammation is what is creating the P and Ps, but the inflammation came first.

    My second thought is that rosacea is a blanket/umbrella term for our skin conditions. I feel that (especially for treatment) that we need to subcategorize type 2 rosacea into further categories to deduce who will respond to which therapies, using a treatment algorithm. For example, some people have underlying SD, demodex folliculitis?, and many of us have differing triggers. It seems as though some people have P and Ps without much redness, and others have much redness with fewer P and Ps. I will leave this up to the dermatologists.

    Lastly, I've looked at the research for metronidazole, finacea, and soolantra. Here's my thoughts on this. Ivermectin/soolantra was found to be better than metronidazole. Finacea was found to be better than metronidazole. Finacea was compared to ivermectin but galderma chose to only evaluate which had the least adverse reactions. Why didn't they examine which had a lower P and P lesion count and such? This seemed fishy to me.

    My other thoughts on comparing medications, is that why is it that the medication "vehicle" seems to be almost as beneficial as the vehicle plus active ingredient for all of these medications? I'm willing to bet that Finacea beat out metronidazole simply because the vehicle is thicker and creates more of a protective barrier against the elements.

    Just some of my thoughts as I've had PPR for 15-20 years and I've given much thought as to the router cause and how to best treat it. Thanks and I appreciate feedback on these thoughts!

  3. #233
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    Hi Dram, that is interesting. I was just wondering have you used Soolantra for your p+ps? and if so have you found it effective?

  4. #234
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    I have not as the price for a tier 3 drug like soolantra with my copay would be really high, and I don't see myself trying to get the veterinary brand to make my own concoction. If I avoid my major triggers and use 40 mg doxy and finacea 2x daily with Olay complete over it 2x daily, and I have stock piled some metrogel to use if I am doing an activity like playing sports or skiing, etc, that my rosacea is fairly well controlled. I also have had many laser sessions (I had done ipl and now do beam once per year to keep things under control).

    I'm just always thinking about a miracle cure, and I like to try to put information out there in the hopes that others will see it and it will progress the research for rosacea more efficiently. As I had stated earlier, I believe that the route cause of PPR is genetic with our faces having more blood vessels and inflammation in part due to the UV rays from the sun and our inadequate melanin in our skin. After all, we were meant to be living in areas that had less sun, that is why we haven't evolved and adapted with darker skin like those from parts of the world which are closer to the equator. This begets more facial inflammation, and those things that happen or contribute to when our faces become inflamed are secondary to this (i.e. gut bacteria, demodex mites, any and all triggers). That being said, we can't intervene at the route cause, so trying to intervene at these secondary levels may work, but it's important to not be fooled into thinking that these are the route causes of PPR.

    I'd also like to add that with the research done with ipl/vbeam and the effects on the P and Ps of PPR, some have no response, and some respond very much so from the vbeam with far less P and Ps. I always responded to laser treatments with less P and Ps as long as it was at a high enough energy level to get rid of not just the superficial blood vessels, but also the deeper ones. I'd be curious to see if the patients who did not respond favorably to this had had enough treatment sessions with the beam/ipl aimed at deeper levels of the skin, and did they use the proper topical and use much sunscreen moisturizer? This seems to be the best chance to address the cause of the inflammation in our faces, which is the increased amount of blood vessels, and hence the increased propensity for flushing and INFLAMMATION. If they ever come out with something that will create more melanin in our skin, that would also come closer to addressing the route cause (and I think they were trying to create melanotan to help people tan with UV light years back, I guess it never went through).

    Once again, let me know if you agree or disagree. Thank you.

  5. #235
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    Aren't lasers more expensive than Soolantra?

  6. #236
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    Quote Originally Posted by dram View Post
    I have not as the price for a tier 3 drug like soolantra with my copay would be really high, and I don't see myself trying to get the veterinary brand to make my own concoction. If I avoid my major triggers and use 40 mg doxy and finacea 2x daily with Olay complete over it 2x daily, and I have stock piled some metrogel to use if I am doing an activity like playing sports or skiing, etc, that my rosacea is fairly well controlled. I also have had many laser sessions (I had done ipl and now do beam once per year to keep things under control).

    I'm just always thinking about a miracle cure, and I like to try to put information out there in the hopes that others will see it and it will progress the research for rosacea more efficiently. As I had stated earlier, I believe that the route cause of PPR is genetic with our faces having more blood vessels and inflammation in part due to the UV rays from the sun and our inadequate melanin in our skin. After all, we were meant to be living in areas that had less sun, that is why we haven't evolved and adapted with darker skin like those from parts of the world which are closer to the equator. This begets more facial inflammation, and those things that happen or contribute to when our faces become inflamed are secondary to this (i.e. gut bacteria, demodex mites, any and all triggers). That being said, we can't intervene at the route cause, so trying to intervene at these secondary levels may work, but it's important to not be fooled into thinking that these are the route causes of PPR.

    I'd also like to add that with the research done with ipl/vbeam and the effects on the P and Ps of PPR, some have no response, and some respond very much so from the vbeam with far less P and Ps. I always responded to laser treatments with less P and Ps as long as it was at a high enough energy level to get rid of not just the superficial blood vessels, but also the deeper ones. I'd be curious to see if the patients who did not respond favorably to this had had enough treatment sessions with the beam/ipl aimed at deeper levels of the skin, and did they use the proper topical and use much sunscreen moisturizer? This seems to be the best chance to address the cause of the inflammation in our faces, which is the increased amount of blood vessels, and hence the increased propensity for flushing and INFLAMMATION. If they ever come out with something that will create more melanin in our skin, that would also come closer to addressing the route cause (and I think they were trying to create melanotan to help people tan with UV light years back, I guess it never went through).

    Once again, let me know if you agree or disagree. Thank you.
    I've often thought that if my skin were tanner/had more melanin that my flushing (and flushing to computers and fluorescent lights) wouldn't be bad. I've noticed that some sunscreens meant to keep out visible light are made tinted and in fairly tan shade. Avene make an SPF 50 compact, for example. Only comes in beige and a darker color for darker skin. Ironic since the people with probs with visible light are people with fair skin. But apparently, it's the tint - the darker beigy tan, that helps shield the skin from light.

    We often hear or read about people who have more melanin in their skin are more protected than we are from the sun and have less skin cancer.

    The prob of course is that we can't go out and get a tan - bad for our rosacea - and puts us at risk of skin cancer, wrinkles, etc.

    I tried for a while to increase my beta carotene foods. As long as you don't go nuts with too much carrot juice, sweet potatoes, etc - you can get a slight coloring that looks fine. But I didn't ever get anywhere with it - stayed snow white.

    High beta carotene supplementation is what they use to treat people with extreme photosensitive diseases. But apparently that has to be done with a doc and carefully monitored as it can be damaging for your health.

    Anywho, I agree. I wish there was a healthy way to get more melanin - so our rosacea might improve.

  7. #237
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    I'm curious how many people in Alaska have Rosacea.

  8. #238
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    I feel that I have looked at so many rosacea studies over the years. Here is the experiment that I would like to see. I would like to see someone placed on 0.3 mg/kg of isotretinoin (I know it has gotten a bad rep and women who may have children have to be very careful, but low dose cmi (continuous micro dose isotretinoin has very low side effects and are comparable to placebo), and also use finacea during the day and ivermectin before bed. As always, use of a sunblock moisturizer for sensitive skin during the day as well. Vbeam used for several sessions to reduce amount of blood vessels and inflammation. I bet PPR would be a distant memory

    I feel that isotretinoin hasn't gotten the attention that it deserves (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3175801/). Ivermectin looks like it's helping a lot of people who were resistant to alternate modes of treatment, but I bet these patients have demodex folliculitis and not rosacea.

  9. #239
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    Yes,ivermectin is only for demodex induced rosacea. If you have questions about retinoin or lasers,there are special sections about them in this forum.

  10. #240
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    Quote Originally Posted by ginaisred View Post
    Sunderland that's great news. Did it help your redness? Did you have flushing? And how long did it take for you to kick in
    Sorry for the very late response. I did have some redness in my cheek bone area, but no flushing. It took about 2 weeks to kick in. I've been using Soolantra for about 2 1/2 months and it has really kept the P&Ps in check.

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