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Thread: Food and Seborrheic Dermatitis

  1. #1
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    Default Food and Seborrheic Dermatitis

    Hi all,

    Quick question about seborrheic dermatitis and food.

    Whenever I eat, it seems like my facial seborrheic dermatitis flares up right after each meal.

    I have been consciously avoiding fried, greasy foods, simple carbs and sugary foods, and sticking to mostly vegetables, proteins and complex carbs, so I'm confused as to why eating continues to make my skin flare up.

    That being said, is there anything I can take orally that will help me out with this (oral terbinafine or fluconazole perhaps)? Does anyone have experience with these treatments?

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    What are the symptoms right after eating? Is it just redness or actual scaly skin?

    I get redness sometimes right after but scaly skin days after depending on what I eat. Milk and wheat are culprits for me.

    Haven't had much experience with those medicines, but oral antibiotics gave me clear skin initially then worse cases of seb dermatitis and rosacea, alongside some eczema patches. So be careful. I think the ones you are mentioning are anti fungals though, right? I don't know the side or long term effects of those.

    Sorry I'm not much help.

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    Senior Member Tom Busby's Avatar
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    Hi Alfred, itraconazole is the approved first-line systemic drug to treat seb derm induced by malassezia. But, because the condition is chronic, and because itraconazole can cause liver damage, your MD will not prescribe it over and over again, so itraconazole is only a temporary solution.

    Ketoconazole is no longer approved by the FDA for systemic use. Oral fluconazole does practically nothing to malassezia, and oral terbinafine is only slightly better.

    I've always contended that diet has no effect on malassezia-based problems. I say that because certain individuals of all mammal species have an innate immune response (allergy) to an overload of malassezia, and because "all mammal species" have an incredibly varied diet, from omnivore to herbivore to carnivore.

    Others are welcome to disagree with my opinion, but I think if you are reacting to food, then you have an additional co-existing condition.

    Of course, general skin health is related to a healthy, varied diet -- I don't contend that a daily diet of cheeseburgers and fries is healthy.

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    I too am curious about flare-ups caused by food. I have been looking for patterns but have not found anything yet. In general I try to avoid any food which may promote inflammation. Also I try to maintain an even omega-3/omega-6 ratio. I am assuming that my skin health is benefiting from this even if the results are not dramatic.

    Actually I do know of one food exception that does cause me to flare, salad with dressing on it. There is no way to eat a salad without at least a trace amount of the oil spilling onto the lips. Before I realized that I had sebD I couldn't figure out why the skin around my upper lip would burn immediately after eating a salad. The reaction to the oil on my skin was actually one of the clues which led me to believe that I had sebD.

    I recently made a dressing using MCT oil, garlic, mustard, umeboshi vinegar (not a true vinegar) and turmeric. Most of these ingredients have anti-fungal,anti-inflammatory, and/or healing properties to them. It tastes pretty darned good too!

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    Hey guys, appreciate the responses.

    Eastmangoboy: after eating, my skin is usually more red and more greasy. Not sure why this is!

    Tombusby: if i do have another co-existing condition, do you know what it might be?

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    Quote Originally Posted by gils4 View Post
    I recently made a dressing using MCT oil, garlic, mustard, umeboshi vinegar (not a true vinegar) and turmeric. Most of these ingredients have anti-fungal,anti-inflammatory, and/or healing properties to them. It tastes pretty darned good too!
    That sounds interesting. I'd like to know if ingesting MCT oil upsets your tummy though. Apparently not everyone can tolerate it at first.

    I've ordered some to use as a topical moisturiser and I'm hoping it doesn't contain Lauric Acid - C12 - like a lot of MCT oils do. As this might be a treat for Malassezia. The oil Tom recommends is expensive to import here (plus possible custom's duty) so I'm trying another one sent within the UK.

    And don't forget gils4 there's always the Bulletproof Coffee recipe made with MCT oil to give you energy throughout the day!

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    Quote Originally Posted by gils4 View Post
    I too am curious about flare-ups caused by food. I have been looking for patterns but have not found anything yet. In general I try to avoid any food which may promote inflammation. Also I try to maintain an even omega-3/omega-6 ratio. I am assuming that my skin health is benefiting from this even if the results are not dramatic.

    Actually I do know of one food exception that does cause me to flare, salad with dressing on it. There is no way to eat a salad without at least a trace amount of the oil spilling onto the lips. Before I realized that I had sebD I couldn't figure out why the skin around my upper lip would burn immediately after eating a salad. The reaction to the oil on my skin was actually one of the clues which led me to believe that I had sebD.

    I recently made a dressing using MCT oil, garlic, mustard, umeboshi vinegar (not a true vinegar) and turmeric. Most of these ingredients have anti-fungal,anti-inflammatory, and/or healing properties to them. It tastes pretty darned good too!
    Thank you for mentioning this. My skin around my lips burn really badly after eating fries, never could figure out why, so just ignored it. I dip my fries in mayonnaise, which is made from oil, that must be the culprit. Why is oil causing this ? Don't get it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sally View Post
    That sounds interesting. I'd like to know if ingesting MCT oil upsets your tummy though. Apparently not everyone can tolerate it at first.
    It's a good thing I didn't know that MCT oil has stomach upsetting potential. My brain likes to play tricks on me when it's armed with information like that! I haven't had any problems with it but my serving sizes have been pretty small. It is a very non offensive thin oil. Hopefully your MCT oil will be Lauric Acid free. Lauric Acid seems to be popular amongst the non-sebderm folks. I guess they often seperate it out and leave us with the lowly C8 and C10 chains. Their trash is our treasure! Thank you Tom for sharing your MCT research!

    Oh yeah, I forgot about Bulletproof Coffee. I usually drink it black but I definitely have to try that out. I have just recently reintroduced coffee into my diet after a 6 month break. Eliminating and reintroducing it did not make any noticeable difference to my sebderm.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Samar2000 View Post
    Thank you for mentioning this. My skin around my lips burn really badly after eating fries, never could figure out why, so just ignored it. I dip my fries in mayonnaise, which is made from oil, that must be the culprit. Why is oil causing this ? Don't get it.
    I am still wrapping my head around the effect oil has on sebderm.

    I may be over simplifying things but my understanding is:
    -Sebderm is the result of the skin reacting to it's own natural flora. More specifically it is the fungus "malassezia" which the skin reacts to.
    -Malassezia can only survive in an oily environment. It metabalizes oils with carbon chain lengths of 12-24.
    -The natural oils on the skin provide food for the malassezia. In addition most skin products also contain oils for the malassezia to feed on.

    Skin contact with the oil from both the fries and the mayonnaise could have contributed to the burning sensation. I have noticed reactions like these on myself. Trying to gently wipe my lips as I eat seems to spread the irritation. I have sebderm on my scalp, ears, and sides of nose. However, the most troublesome area for me by far is the skin around my lips and the skin between my lips and nose. I don't think that those are common areas for most people though.

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    Quote Originally Posted by alfred2 View Post
    is there anything I can take orally that will help me out with this (oral terbinafine or fluconazole perhaps)? Does anyone have experience with these treatments?
    Hi Alfred, I have read of some rosacea sufferers who noticed that the act of chewing seems to cause their flare. Does your skin react if you chew gum?

    I haven't tried any oral anti-fungals. I have been taking a chewable oral probiotic made specifically for mouth flora. I don't know if this is helping or not. It definitely isn't helping in a dramatic way but hopefully it is doing something for me. I'll take whatever help I can get!

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