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Thread: What is wrong with me (us) ????

  1. #1
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    Default What is wrong with me (us) ????

    When I look around at other people my age (23) I usually see clear, matte skin without any imperfections. How can someone (me) have 5+ different long term problems going on with my face when some people have literally ZERO. I have:

    -Acne. Though it has calmed down a lot since I've gotten older.
    -Oily skin which hasn't calmed down at all and makes everything else worse
    -Falky/Dryness. My skin flakes and peels whenever I kiss a girl, rub something against it. This is related to oilyness i think.
    -Seb Derm. Usually comes along with oily skin and causes some of the flaking, redness and itching.
    -Rosacea. Gives me bumps, flushing, and red/faded discolored patches of skin.
    -Also Folliculitis, Scalp flaking, etc.

    Something must be wrong with me either internally or externally to experience all of these skin maladies at age 23 when nobody else is. Most people don't really think about their skin but I never don't think about it. My question is, what is wrong with me, or us? Since I know many on this site experience at least 2+ of those ^ problems, I figured I would ask here. Maybe somebody can shed some light as to why I (we) am so susceptible to facial skin problems.

  2. #2
    Member kimber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by skatinislife446 View Post
    Something must be wrong with me either internally or externally to experience all of these skin maladies at age 23 when nobody else is. Most people don't really think about their skin but I never don't think about it. My question is, what is wrong with me, or us? Since I know many on this site experience at least 2+ of those ^ problems, I figured I would ask here. Maybe somebody can shed some light as to why I (we) am so susceptible to facial skin problems.
    I'm not a healthcare provider, but from my own reading and my lab tests, I've inferred that it's an auto-immune response. I had blood work done when I got my diagnosis of P&P in 2012, and there's a particular test for anti-nuclear antibodies that is called the immunofluorescent antinuclear antibody test, or ANA, and my numbers were high but not at the Lupus stage, so my dr said I definitely have an auto-immune disorder. I don't know if all dr's do this type of test to diagnose rosacea, but mine was trying to rule out other things, I think, because I also have epilepsy and take a med for that.

    I totally changed my diet and lifestyle since then, and that has helped immensely, but I still flare 2-3 times a month if I try something new or cheat, although I can go without flaring if I stick to my regimen.

    If you haven't started keeping a list of products and food that seem to coorelate with flares, you need to do that. You'd be surprised what a Coke or vitamin can do to wreck a beautiful face, but it differs for many people, hence the need for YOUR own log.

    If you have insurance, ask for the ANA test and if you're positive, find a good anti-inflammatory diet/lifestyle, which will help, but won't guarantee a symptom-free life. Good luck and hang in there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kimber View Post
    I'm not a healthcare provider, but from my own reading and my lab tests, I've inferred that it's an auto-immune response. I had blood work done when I got my diagnosis of P&P in 2012, and there's a particular test for anti-nuclear antibodies that is called the immunofluorescent antinuclear antibody test, or ANA, and my numbers were high but not at the Lupus stage, so my dr said I definitely have an auto-immune disorder. I don't know if all dr's do this type of test to diagnose rosacea, but mine was trying to rule out other things, I think, because I also have epilepsy and take a med for that.
    ...

    If you have insurance, ask for the ANA test and if you're positive, find a good anti-inflammatory diet/lifestyle, which will help, but won't guarantee a symptom-free life. Good luck and hang in there.
    I had a high ANA a couple to times, when docs were trying to figure out why I had weakness and palpitations after a viral infection (that actually was likely a bacterial pneumonia). I saw a rheumatologist and he told me a high ANA does not indicate that you necessarily have an auto-immune disease and he ran specific tests for a many auto-immune diseases, none of which came back positive. And in fact, my ANA went down markedly after the high level measured when I was in the emergency room when my illness was acute so I believe what the rheumatologist said about the ANA test.

    I would say if you have other symptoms that indicate some auto-immune disease then see a specialist but otherwise I say don't worry or compare yourself to others. Everyone has their own health and emotional issues to deal with. How good our skin is does have a genetic component. As I have gotten older, I find that I have all the same skin ailments my father did at my age. I just look at his skin and hair to see what I have to look forward to, LOL. I do believe you can help yourself a lot by eating well and engaging in a healthful lifestyle though, but the fact of the matter is some people can eat pure crap and abuse their bodies and still go around looking and feeling great. Others of us are more sensitive and though having eaten healthy for years, have to watch everything we put in our mouths and on our skin.

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    And staying out of the sun. I truly believe that my rosacea first got triggered by getting a little too much sun at a daytime football game in early October last year. Within a couple of weeks I had a very nasty rash next to my nose and p&ps under my nose and near my mouth. I was never a sun worshipper to begin with, so I burn very easily. I am so very careful now, wearing sunscreen and hats and making sure my face is covered in the car if the sun is shining on my side. Like I've always told my husband, the sun is the devil!

  5. #5
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    Default ANA tests

    Quote Originally Posted by lwemm View Post
    I had a high ANA a couple to times, when docs were trying to figure out why I had weakness and palpitations after a viral infection (that actually was likely a bacterial pneumonia). I saw a rheumatologist and he told me a high ANA does not indicate that you necessarily have an auto-immune disease and he ran specific tests for a many auto-immune diseases, none of which came back positive. And in fact, my ANA went down markedly after the high level measured when I was in the emergency room when my illness was acute so I believe what the rheumatologist said about the ANA test.

    I would say if you have other symptoms that indicate some auto-immune disease then see a specialist but otherwise I say don't worry or compare yourself to others. Everyone has their own health and emotional issues to deal with. How good our skin is does have a genetic component. As I have gotten older, I find that I have all the same skin ailments my father did at my age. I just look at his skin and hair to see what I have to look forward to, LOL. I do believe you can help yourself a lot by eating well and engaging in a healthful lifestyle though, but the fact of the matter is some people can eat pure crap and abuse their bodies and still go around looking and feeling great. Others of us are more sensitive and though having eaten healthy for years, have to watch everything we put in our mouths and on our skin.
    Yes, ANA fluctuates. Those with diagnosed Lupus and other AI disorders often have low numbers or negative results. There are other measurements that must also be checked to confirm AI, such as ESR (sed rates) and CRP (c-reactive protein).

    You are quite right though; we are all different, and my diagnoses does not indicate someone else's, but we must all keep an open mind and be tested by good doctors who are willing to take the time to do multiple tests and treat our diseases, not simply our symptoms.

    Peace be with you.

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    Default The Internal Expressing as External

    Quote Originally Posted by skatinislife446 View Post
    When I look around at other people my age (23) I usually see clear, matte skin without any imperfections. How can someone (me) have 5+ different long term problems going on with my face when some people have literally ZERO. I have:

    -Acne. Though it has calmed down a lot since I've gotten older.
    -Oily skin which hasn't calmed down at all and makes everything else worse
    -Falky/Dryness. My skin flakes and peels whenever I kiss a girl, rub something against it. This is related to oilyness i think.
    -Seb Derm. Usually comes along with oily skin and causes some of the flaking, redness and itching.
    -Rosacea. Gives me bumps, flushing, and red/faded discolored patches of skin.
    -Also Folliculitis, Scalp flaking, etc.

    Something must be wrong with me either internally or externally to experience all of these skin maladies at age 23 when nobody else is. Most people don't really think about their skin but I never don't think about it. My question is, what is wrong with me, or us? Since I know many on this site experience at least 2+ of those ^ problems, I figured I would ask here. Maybe somebody can shed some light as to why I (we) am so susceptible to facial skin problems.

  7. #7
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    Default The Internal Expressing as External

    Hi,

    I think you hit the nail on the head when you said 'there must be something wrong internally.....'. That's pretty much it and it's so difficult to get a diagnosis from a regular doctor because they just don't know. So you have to start being your own health guru. From my endless research on natural health, I have come to the conclusion that what's critical to good health is a healthy gut. This is achieved by the longterm habit of eating fresh and healthy food - staying off processed food and drinks, sugar and cereals/bread - and taking a good probiotic capsule each night before bed. Many of us are carrying parasites around in our bodies and we don't even know it. There is a school of thought that says that Rosacea is caused by small mites in/on the skin. You may also experience sore/itchy eyes - again, possibly tiny mites.

    This is an absolutely awful subject, I know! Nobody wants to think that their bodies are harbouring parasites but again, my endless research has led me to believe that just about every illness you care to name starts by some kind of parasitic problem/yeast infection within the body So whilst a healthy eating regime is critical - along with using only organic products/make-up on your hair and skin - a body detoxification regime is absolutely crucial to recovery and this takes time and lifestyle change.

    I personally have found that using Diamotaceous Earth (DE) is very beneficial - google the food grade DE, very good for detoxing gently and without aches and pains, excellent for skin and hair. I put a spoonful in almond milk every morning and drink it. I have also found witchhazel dabbed daily on the skin where the Roseacea is showing does make it gradually go away.

    Finally, I believe the body to be the best machine ever invented and when things go wrong with it then it tells you by manifesting illness, blemishes, rashes etc. etc. So listen to your body. If you eat lots of sweets, for example, and you break out in a rash then your body is telling you it didn't care for the sweets. So make a mental note of what you eat a lot of in your every day diet and then begin to ask yourself if any of those everyday dietary items might not be so good for you after all.

    Try this simple kinesiology test for the things you eat/use regularly: Stand up straight in front of a table/ counter/ whatever.... have some things in front of you, ie. food items, vitamin pills, whatever you use a lot of... gently touch the items one by one with both hands, close your eyes, stay relaxed... then let your body tell you if it's drawn to them or repelled by them. If you find yourself involuntarily leaning toward the items, they are ok for you. If your body feels like it's leaning back and away, then they are not good for you. Practice it.... great technique that you can use all the time - try it around the shops and watch everyone look at you and think what a nutcase, ha ha! It works though.

    Sainty x

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