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Thread: Time Delay between Trigger Food Consumption and Flushing?

  1. #1
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    Default Time Delay between Trigger Food Consumption and Flushing?

    Hello,

    I've identified my main triggers pretty easily (the usual: exercise, sun, wind, alcohol), but I'm having a difficult time pinpointing my diet triggers. How long of delay should I expect between when I eat a trigger food (say vinegar, fruit, dairy, or gluten) and when I react to it?

    I keep a daily list of my redness and all the foods I consumed that day (along with notes on my main triggers to keep a controlled study), but I'm having a hard time identifying any sort of correlation with any of them. I've even tried removing them individually, but I'm always mild to moderately red, so it's hard to tell. Would a better strategy be to buy a bunch of one type of common trigger food (i.e. grapes), binge on them in one sitting and see the results?

    Let me know your thoughts!

    Thanks,
    Russell

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    It's a great question, I have also been thinking about this.

    My guess is that it will depend on your digestive and immune system and therefore difficult to know.

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    Last week I finally decided to get my diet in order. I generally eat pretty healthily, but I discovered that gluten and dairy are huge triggers.

    For the past 4-6 months I've been having Greek yoghurt with banana for breakfast before heading to the gym.
    Within a few minutes of working out my face would already feel inflamed and the sweat would start to intensify.
    Last Wednesday after reading about casein and gut inflammation, I decided to skip the Greek yoghurt, and have some apple, strawberries and blueberries instead.
    At the gym 30 minutes later I was amazed. I didn't flush anywhere near as bad as I normally would, nor did I sweat up a storm (I was starting to think that I have facial hyperhidrosis).

    I usually flush at the gym, and have a warm/flushy face for the remainder of the day.
    I've found that my other main triggers, such as heat and social anxiety, don't cause me to flush/is minimal if I stay away from gluten and dairy, which is awesome!
    Last Friday evening I had some chicken (usually chicken doesn't make me flush). I didn't realise until later that it had been marinated in soy sauce, and other ingredients.
    Within a minute of my last bite I felt flustered and sweat beads started to form all over my face.
    Besides that little hiccup, I've been practically flush free since last Wednesday and my skin appears to be healing, both the texture and redness.
    My sister got married on Saturday - I was so worried that I'd be in a constant flush from the get go, but again, by avoiding gluten and dairy I went the whole day without flushing.
    I'm the kind of guy who flushes after talking to one person. I probably talked to about 50!
    I'm positive that if I had eaten poorly that morning/afternoon/previous day(s) that it would I would have flushed, and been more reactive to the usual triggers.

    I really hope this helps some of you. I love pizza, pasta, and schnitzels, but I'd give up almost anything to reduce the severity of my flushing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Josef61 View Post
    Last week I finally decided to get my diet in order. I generally eat pretty healthily, but I discovered that gluten and dairy are huge triggers.

    For the past 4-6 months I've been having Greek yoghurt with banana for breakfast before heading to the gym.
    Within a few minutes of working out my face would already feel inflamed and the sweat would start to intensify.
    Last Wednesday after reading about casein and gut inflammation, I decided to skip the Greek yoghurt, and have some apple, strawberries and blueberries instead.
    At the gym 30 minutes later I was amazed. I didn't flush anywhere near as bad as I normally would, nor did I sweat up a storm (I was starting to think that I have facial hyperhidrosis).

    I usually flush at the gym, and have a warm/flushy face for the remainder of the day.
    I've found that my other main triggers, such as heat and social anxiety, don't cause me to flush/is minimal if I stay away from gluten and dairy, which is awesome!
    Last Friday evening I had some chicken (usually chicken doesn't make me flush). I didn't realise until later that it had been marinated in soy sauce, and other ingredients.
    Within a minute of my last bite I felt flustered and sweat beads started to form all over my face.
    Besides that little hiccup, I've been practically flush free since last Wednesday and my skin appears to be healing, both the texture and redness.
    My sister got married on Saturday - I was so worried that I'd be in a constant flush from the get go, but again, by avoiding gluten and dairy I went the whole day without flushing.
    I'm the kind of guy who flushes after talking to one person. I probably talked to about 50!
    I'm positive that if I had eaten poorly that morning/afternoon/previous day(s) that it would I would have flushed, and been more reactive to the usual triggers.

    I really hope this helps some of you. I love pizza, pasta, and schnitzels, but I'd give up almost anything to reduce the severity of my flushing.

    Great to read youve had such success with changing your diet and managed to enjoy the wedding!
    Ive also wondered about the time delay in food consumption as I tend to flush anywhere between 5 and 9 each evening regardless of what I'm doing, and the only thing I can really think of is its some sort of delayed reaction to food eaten during the day. I've just started a juice fast to give my digestive system a break, possibly figure out the SIBO thing, and as a great way to cut out diary and gluten etc. I'm having mininal fruit to avoid too many sugars, mostly cucumbers, carrots and green veggies like kale. bit extreme but hoping i can figure out some of my triggers this way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Josef61 View Post
    Last week I finally decided to get my diet in order. I generally eat pretty healthily, but I discovered that gluten and dairy are huge triggers.

    For the past 4-6 months I've been having Greek yoghurt with banana for breakfast before heading to the gym.
    Within a few minutes of working out my face would already feel inflamed and the sweat would start to intensify.
    Last Wednesday after reading about casein and gut inflammation, I decided to skip the Greek yoghurt, and have some apple, strawberries and blueberries instead.
    At the gym 30 minutes later I was amazed. I didn't flush anywhere near as bad as I normally would, nor did I sweat up a storm (I was starting to think that I have facial hyperhidrosis).

    I usually flush at the gym, and have a warm/flushy face for the remainder of the day.
    I've found that my other main triggers, such as heat and social anxiety, don't cause me to flush/is minimal if I stay away from gluten and dairy, which is awesome!
    Last Friday evening I had some chicken (usually chicken doesn't make me flush). I didn't realise until later that it had been marinated in soy sauce, and other ingredients.
    Within a minute of my last bite I felt flustered and sweat beads started to form all over my face.
    Besides that little hiccup, I've been practically flush free since last Wednesday and my skin appears to be healing, both the texture and redness.
    My sister got married on Saturday - I was so worried that I'd be in a constant flush from the get go, but again, by avoiding gluten and dairy I went the whole day without flushing.
    I'm the kind of guy who flushes after talking to one person. I probably talked to about 50!
    I'm positive that if I had eaten poorly that morning/afternoon/previous day(s) that it would I would have flushed, and been more reactive to the usual triggers.

    I really hope this helps some of you. I love pizza, pasta, and schnitzels, but I'd give up almost anything to reduce the severity of my flushing.
    It's not the casein. Fermented foods like yogurt are high in histamines. Flushing rosacea is a disorder that involves the histamine metabolism and might be a mast cell disorder. Take a look at lists of foods that are high and low in histamines.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Josef61 View Post
    Last week I finally decided to get my diet in order. I generally eat pretty healthily, but I discovered that gluten and dairy are huge triggers.

    For the past 4-6 months I've been having Greek yoghurt with banana for breakfast before heading to the gym.
    Within a few minutes of working out my face would already feel inflamed and the sweat would start to intensify.
    Last Wednesday after reading about casein and gut inflammation, I decided to skip the Greek yoghurt, and have some apple, strawberries and blueberries instead.
    At the gym 30 minutes later I was amazed. I didn't flush anywhere near as bad as I normally would, nor did I sweat up a storm (I was starting to think that I have facial hyperhidrosis).
    It sounds like 30 minutes is enough to get you flushing.. I have gone gluten free for five weeks (no luck :/) and dairy free for 2 weeks (no luck), but never together. I will certainly try that next.

    Afterwards I will give a low histamine diet a try. If anyone has any more ideas about the time delay between ingestion and flushing, please share!

    Thanks for the feedback everyone!

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    Default Food

    Hello, I'm very frustrated, as i'v cut out practically all possible trigger foods mentioned on most Rosacea information sites and eating very pure, raw organic foods...but I still have Rosacea redness...it is a mild redness compared to some but it's all over my nose and cheeks...I'm finding it hard to believe that Diet con really cure Rosacea...maybe keep it better controlled, but I'm starting to believe the redness is permanent damage and can only be removed with Laser...can anyone share this experience?

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    while avoiding triggers is a very good thing, in my experience it is not a cure. permanent redness is caused by the flushing we experienced before our diagnoses and is not going to go away merely by avoiding triggers. avoiding triggers will reduce the number of flares you experience, as will learning how to cool that flush before it becomes a major flare, but it will not make permanent redness disappear.

    it is also important to note that these 'triggers' are highly individual. what may cause you to flush may be undetectable to me and vice versa. triggers can also be found in skin care and any makeup that you use and with some medications. it is important that you learn what your personal triggers are so that you can make lifestyle changes.

    i got my official diagnosis 10 years ago at age 40 following a year of serious life/death medical issues. i am certain that if i had gone to a derm 30 years ago, i would have gotten the same diagnosis. all those years of flushing lead to permanent redness from my chest to my cheeks. in the 10 years since my diagnosis (subtype 1) i have had little success with the usual prescribed meds (metrogel, oracea, finacea) but have been able to control my condition through life style changes and excellent skin care. i have also learned a whole lot about makeup application and ingredients. the thing that probably helped the most was the two series of IPL treatments. i am looking forward to the next time in my life where i am experience a bit of prosperity to go a few more rounds with the IPL.

    to answer your precise question about time delay, for me it can range from immediately, within 30 minutes and occasionally a few hours from trigger to flush time.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Scot Viking's Avatar
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    Default Celebrating A Full Year of Being Rosacea Free

    Hi,

    I am celebrating a full year of being Rosacea Free. No Doxycycline, no topicals, no meds at all But of course, that is just me.

    A very savvy question Mister Twiggy. It took me a good year and a half of spreadsheet tracking, food elimination and the help of a very dear friend who is a nurse in order to figure this out. Here are the principles which worked for me.

    1. Things that "Trigger Redness" and things that Cause Rosacea are TWO DIFFERENT THINGS.

    2. Get rid of the cause of Rosacea and you will not have to worry about being red from the triggers. Triggers were a COMPLETE WASTE OF TIME, DECADES OF SUFFERING for me.

    3. I eliminated my Rosacea by eliminating the cause. My body cannot tolerate corn, wheat, dairy, soy, canola, alfalfa, whey, super foods, or anything which impacts my intestinal bacteria negatively. Any foods with odd or iffy bacteria in them will also make it flare up. (I suspect these are gram negative bacteria, but that testing will follow)

    a. When I eat wheat - boom, I get deep pustules on the outer sides of my face and up to the each side of my forehead - Duration before happening ~ 8 - 12 hours
    b. When I eat corn - boom, I get deep pustules in the capillaries on either side of my nose and out onto my cheek - Duration before happening ~ 6 - 12 hours
    c. When I eat canola oil - boom, I get shallow pustules and clusters of red sores on my nose, and cheeks - Duration before happening ~ 2 - 4 hours
    d. When I eat soy - boom, I get red cheeks and shallow pustules and clusters of red sores on my cheeks - Duration before happening ~ 2 - 4 hours
    e. When I eat dairy - gradually I get shallow pustules on either side of my nose - Duration before happening 18 - 28 hours
    f. When I eat whey - boom, I get deep pustules on the outer sides of my face and up to the each side of my forehead - Duration before happening ~ 8 - 12 hours
    g. When I eat alfalfa or super greens - boom, my entire face breaks out in painful bleeding sores, and people ask me if I am OK ...... Duration before happening ~ 4 - 12 hours -

    Typically once I have ingested these toxic foods (which also make me feel bad too) - It takes me a full 18 days to rid my face of the damage that these foods do to me - to where it is totally clear. So one has to be patient.

    One has to also be careful because Canola Oil is snuck into almost every oil using processed food on the market, because it is cheap compared to safflower or sunflower oil, and vegetable oils are now being used for other things.

    The problem with TRIGGERS and TOPICALS and the myriad of other honest approaches out there is that this disease is CYCLICAL. You can dance a voo-doo dance with dolls with pins and chickens and that will also improve your rosacea - because the disease in SINUSOIDAL - it comes and it goes in about a 6 week cycle from what I have seen. A sinusoidal pattern that is in a fluctuating equilibrium with your body's immune system and the compromise decisions it makes with regard to the ingestion of prolaminate and glutien toxins which are bound with the proteins that it needs. So anything can tender the appearance of making an improvement if you just look at a 3 week period.

    4. I can eat peppers, coffee, dark chocolate, sugar, hot tea, vinegar, baking soda, salt, all manner of terrible trigger folklore AND IT DOES NOTHING NOW. I used to turn red just looking at a cup of hot cider. Now it does not do a thing to me.

    For what it's worth.

    ~ SV

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    Thank you so much Faux and Scot. Both those answers were very helpful.

    Scot is seems like you have quite an interesting array of triggers and I'm intrigued that so many common triggers do nothing for you!

    If anyone else has input about triggers and how long they take to make you flush, I would love to hear them!

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