Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 32

Thread: Flushing and high glycemic index foods

  1. #1
    Senior Member Nadine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Northwestern USA
    Posts
    238
    Country: United States

    Default Flushing and high glycemic index foods

    I'm getting more and more convinced that eating foods with a high glycemic index (sugars, starches, etc - for more info see here) is a major part of what makes me more flush-prone.

    I don't necessarily flush automatically upon eating something high glycemic, but it seems to put me in a flush prone state where, if another trigger happens, the flushing is particularly intense.

    Example: After eating popcorn and drinking apple juice (my version of junk food these days), I was on skype, having a conversation with someone I don't know well (so, slight social anxiety I guess). And since I was on Skype, I had the benefit (?) of seeing my own image down in the corner of the screen. Whenever I laughed, or had a self-conscious or awkward moment, I got to see my face turn bright red. When I tried to figure out why I was so flush-prone, all I could think of was the high glycemic snack I had just before the call.

    Annoying, but good to know so I can avoid high glycemic foods before important meetings or social events. I always see lists of triggers, but I'm just now figuring out how the different factors interact - in this case high blood sugar + laughing/nervousness. Anyone else notice a correlation like this?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Centre, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    5,172

    Default

    I have been saying this since 1999. The NRS has never acknowledged this on their 'official trigger list.' If you will note on the NRS Trigger list, the first four diet triggers are Liver, Yogurt, Sour Cream and Cheese. Eggplant is listed as #10 and Spinach is listed as #12. You might want to read this post about these diet triggers.

    Sugar and carbohydrate are as valid a rosacea trigger as liver, yogurt, sour cream, cheese, eggplant, avocados (#11) and spinach. Here is the RRDi comprehensive diet trigger list. And here is a more comprehensive rosacea trigger list compiled by the RRDi.
    Brady Barrows
    Blog Join the RRDi



  3. #3
    Senior Member Nadine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Northwestern USA
    Posts
    238
    Country: United States

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    I have been saying this since 1999. The NRS has never acknowledged this on their 'official trigger list.' If you will note on the NRS Trigger list, the first four diet triggers are Liver, Yogurt, Sour Cream and Cheese. Eggplant is listed as #10 and Spinach is listed as #12. You might want to read this post about these diet triggers.

    Sugar and carbohydrate are as valid a rosacea trigger as liver, yogurt, sour cream, cheese, eggplant, avocados (#11) and spinach. Here is the RRDi comprehensive diet trigger list. And here is a more comprehensive rosacea trigger list compiled by the RRDi.
    Thanks Brady. I think what confused me for so long was that my trigger around high glycemic foods isn't necessarily immediate; they seem to put me in a state where I'm more sensitive to other triggers (e.g. anxiety, laughing). In my example, I'm thinking that if I hadn't had the popcorn and apple juice, I would have gotten through my video call without flushing & blushing - nervous or funny moments notwithstanding. And if I hadn't had the video call, but had instead finished my popcorn and juice, read for a while and gone to bed, I would've been none the wiser.

    I hate to sound like an "anti-pharma conspiracy nut," but after almost 2 decades of frustration with the options presented to me, I feel like I'm finally seeing what's been right in front of me for so long. They confuse and overwhelm us with lists of random foods like eggplant, yogurt, and spinach, meanwhile prescribing pills and topicals that (in my case at least) do more harm than good (and don't even get me started on the stuff about cutting back on exercise!), when many if not most of us could have saved a lot of trouble & time by just cutting out the cookies, candy, and chips. Gah!!

    Ok, vent over. I guess I should just be happy that I'm finally sitting here with clear skin, my hair/eye/gut problems sorted, and fine tuning my lifestyle to reduce my occasional flushing. Just wish I'd started here back in my 20s when all this started.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Centre, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    5,172

    Default

    I think that it is an accumulative trigger. I can sometimes eat a bowl of vanilla ice cream and not have a rosacea flare up. However, over a course of several days if I eat too much carbohydrate I break out on my nose or cheek with some rosacea flareup.

    You are probably right that stress along with eating high carbohydrate adds to the flare up. It appears that stress is a trigger that is put on all the lists.

    Glad you figured it out and can control your rosacea with diet trigger avoidance. Not many rosacea sufferers are willing to make such a drastic life style change and give up their sweet life style. They prefer taking antibiotics (whether low dose or not), metronidazole (a topical antibiotic), isotretinoin, bromonidine, sodium sulfacetamide-sulfur, azeliac acid, or anti-flushing drugs rather than choosing diet trigger avoidance that would curtail their lifestyle.

    When you read about all the complaints rosacea sufferers report using the prescription drugs to control rosacea, I think the sacrifice of not eating sugar or high carbohydrate pales into insignificance the side effects and risks of prescription drugs.
    Brady Barrows
    Blog Join the RRDi



  5. #5
    Senior Member Nadine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Northwestern USA
    Posts
    238
    Country: United States

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    I think that it is an accumulative trigger. I can sometimes eat a bowl of vanilla ice cream and not have a rosacea flare up. However, over a course of several days if I eat too much carbohydrate I break out on my nose or cheek with some rosacea flareup.
    That makes sense. When I think about how to make the lifestyle sustainable, I keep running into the issue of wanting to relax my food restrictions when I'm socializing. Thinking of it as an accumulative helps because it suggests that if I'm really clean about my day to day diet at home, it might be ok partake in the occasional treat if it's offered in a social setting. For me, thinking of it that way makes it feel more palatable over the long term.

    You are probably right that stress along with eating high carbohydrate adds to the flare up. It appears that stress is a trigger that is put on all the lists.
    Yes, but sometimes the stress is so subtle! My Skype call last night was a perfect experiment because I could actually see my face while I was talking. I didn't feel stressed, but when I saw my face turn red I realized actually yes, in that moment I was feeling some slight social discomfort. So annoying - reminds me of when I was a teenager and was always getting teased for blushing, which of course made me blush even more.

    Glad you figured it out and can control your rosacea with diet trigger avoidance. Not many rosacea sufferers are willing to make such a drastic life style change and give up their sweet life style. They prefer taking antibiotics (whether low dose or not), metronidazole (a topical antibiotic), isotretinoin, bromonidine, sodium sulfacetamide-sulfur, azeliac acid, or anti-flushing drugs rather than choosing diet trigger avoidance that would curtail their lifestyle.

    When you read about all the complaints rosacea sufferers report using the prescription drugs to control rosacea, I think the sacrifice of not eating sugar or high carbohydrate pales into insignificance the side effects and risks of prescription drugs.
    Oh, I already went through gamut of prescription treatments, twice (once in my 20s and with another dermatologist in my 30s), so I guess I've resisted the lifestyle changes long enough! Also, along with my diet changes I'm also doing some OTC/natural topicals, which I've talked about on other threads. Basically, 3 weeks of Prosacea got things under control from a pretty sorry state, and now I'm hoping to maintain with as-needed applications of an OTC sulfur cream in natural oils ("Sulfur Butter Cream 'n Ointment" from Amazon) and argan oil/TTO blend (thanks to Kisha for that one).

    What's alarming to me is how sugar is so deeply incorporated into our food culture. Giving up sugar is in some ways a more radical act (and more socially challenging, at least in my part of the country) than going vegan or gluten free.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Centre, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    5,172

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nadine View Post

    What's alarming to me is how sugar is so deeply incorporated into our food culture. Giving up sugar is in some ways a more radical act (and more socially challenging, at least in my part of the country) than going vegan or gluten free.
    Absolutely. Being a vegan is a piece of cake.

    Stop eating cake, you are a saint, the persecution starts and the sugar blues.
    Last edited by Brady Barrows; 17th December 2013 at 07:25 AM.
    Brady Barrows
    Blog Join the RRDi



  7. #7
    Senior Member Nadine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Northwestern USA
    Posts
    238
    Country: United States

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    Absolutely. Being a vegan is a piece of cake.

    Stop eating cake and you are a saint and the persecution starts and the sugar blues.

    People really get their feelings hurt if you're not willing to sample their latest home-made sugar-bombs. It's an important social ritual, especially around this time of year!

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Deep South, USA
    Posts
    712
    Country: United States

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    I think that it is an accumulative trigger. I can sometimes eat a bowl of vanilla ice cream and not have a rosacea flare up. However, over a course of several days if I eat too much carbohydrate I break out on my nose or cheek with some rosacea flareup.

    You are probably right that stress along with eating high carbohydrate adds to the flare up. It appears that stress is a trigger that is put on all the lists.

    Glad you figured it out and can control your rosacea with diet trigger avoidance. Not many rosacea sufferers are willing to make such a drastic life style change and give up their sweet life style. They prefer taking antibiotics (whether low dose or not), metronidazole (a topical antibiotic), isotretinoin, bromonidine, sodium sulfacetamide-sulfur, azeliac acid, or anti-flushing drugs rather than choosing diet trigger avoidance that would curtail their lifestyle.

    When you read about all the complaints rosacea sufferers report using the prescription drugs to control rosacea, I think the sacrifice of not eating sugar or high carbohydrate pales into insignificance the side effects and risks of prescription drugs.
    I agree that diet is significantly important. I have seen the good results changing diet makes on
    My skin. However, to say that other rosaceans "prefer" to take topicals or antibioticsetc.... Is downright
    Inaccurate. Even with a change in diet, a prescription med may be STILL necessary as maintenance
    Or occassionaly to bring it under control. Rosacea is varied in symptoms as we know; and the tools
    In the toolbox can and should be used without burden of guilt.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Centre, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    5,172

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nadine View Post
    People really get their feelings hurt if you're not willing to sample their latest home-made sugar-bombs. It's an important social ritual, especially around this time of year!
    Make the diabetic or one who has a peanut allergy feel guilty and ashamed. I could go on.
    Brady Barrows
    Blog Join the RRDi



  10. #10
    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Centre, Alabama, USA
    Posts
    5,172

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Birdie View Post
    I agree that diet is significantly important. I have seen the good results changing diet makes on
    My skin. However, to say that other rosaceans "prefer" to take topicals or antibioticsetc.... Is downright
    Inaccurate. Even with a change in diet, a prescription med may be STILL necessary as maintenance
    Or occassionaly to bring it under control. Rosacea is varied in symptoms as we know; and the tools
    In the toolbox can and should be used without burden of guilt.
    And it is ok to make those who choose not to eat sugar feel ashamed and guilty for choosing not to eat? 'Oh, come on, what's wrong with apple pie and ice cream? Don't you love your grandma?' 'This egg nog is grandpa's recipe." "I especially bought this candy for you!" "I went to so much trouble making this just for you." Social beliefs are very strong and can make one feel guilty.

    If one chooses to take prescription medications that is their choice and right. And if there are any consequences for this choice, they live with them, because that is their choice.

    Take Mirvaso. Would you describe being informed of the side effect rebound before accepting the treatment a burden of guilt? If the person accepts Mirvaso treatment and then suffers rebound and then complains, that is human nature. If a person is informed that sugar is a rosacea trigger and decides to eat lots of sugar and then breaks out in a rosacea flareup, that is their choice. And it is human nature to complain about it.

    Being informed about the side effects and risks of a prescription drug or about possible rosacea triggers and accepting the treatment or eating and drinking a possible rosacea trigger is everyone's right. And it is everyone's right to complain about it. All I said, is that most rosacea sufferers prefer prescription topicals or oral treatments. That is their choice. As Nadine pointed out there are all sorts of social beliefs that make people feel guilty. Changing a diet life style sometimes results in feeling guilty and ashamed. Vegans are made fun of.

    So if you think that stating the fact that most rosacea sufferers prefer prescription topicals or oral treatments over diet trigger avoidance causes a burden of guilt, then you may have at least awakened in this person some knowledge of the connection between what one is eating and drinking with rosacea, which is a good thing. Guilt can be positive. It results in making changes. All I am pointing out is that most rosacea sufferers will not change their diet life style and avoid sugar or carbohydrate, and that is a fact.
    Brady Barrows
    Blog Join the RRDi



Similar Threads

  1. Medical.net - High-fiber foods can fight inflammation
    By RSS News Bot in forum Other News Feeds
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 25th March 2013, 12:30 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 12th March 2013, 04:20 AM
  3. High histamine foods and rosacea
    By pie in forum General rosacea questions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 2nd April 2011, 12:52 PM
  4. foods v flushing
    By ally24 in forum Topical and oral products (non-prescription)
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 19th November 2008, 08:07 PM
  5. what foods are high in histamine?
    By mills in forum General rosacea questions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 23rd October 2007, 10:13 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •