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Thread: Mongolians have the most rosacea

  1. #1
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    Default Mongolians have the most rosacea

    The top ethnicity to inherit rosacea are either English or Irish according to rosacea.org, but I don't buy it for a second.

    Do a Google image search for "Mongolian faces" or "Mongolians" and see how many red faces you can pick out. Now try the alleged top rosacea ethnicities, "English faces" or "Irish faces". I can hardly find one that even comes close to being slightly rosy.

    Here's just some of the ones I found for Mongolians. I looked for about 25 seconds to pick these out.

    http://chechar.files.wordpress.com/2...n_fur_hat.jpeg
    http://farm2.staticflickr.com/1243/8...002a6afa_z.jpg
    http://77.68.47.12/bbchumanplanet/wp...o-resized1.jpg
    http://marielu.org/blond-mongol-girl.jpg
    http://www.mongolianculture.com/mongolian-children.gif


    Surely I can't be the only person to have noticed this?
    Last edited by Vovin; 8th October 2013 at 01:33 AM.

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    Senior Member Starlite's Avatar
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    It seems to me that the Mongolian peoples live in high mountainous regions and are subjected to constant cold and wind on their face creating a chronic low level frost bite on their cheeks. And/Or they live in close proximity with their livestock such as birds of pray, horses, oxen, dogs etc.. etc.. being exposed to mites in high concentrations. Many other tribal people also live with their livestock and do not have the same problem, so I am guessing it is more likely the cold and wind. Isn't this new medication that just came out sort'a creating the same conditions for the facial skin; chronic loss of circulation and nutritive blood supply?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Starlite View Post
    Many other tribal people also live with their livestock and do not have the same problem, so I am guessing it is more likely the cold and wind.
    If we are to believe that it is from cold and wind we should have to expect to see Russians with the same results, or other extremely cold regions. I'd be willing to speculate that Mongolians have certain genes that don't react well to cold climate, so it may be part genetics and part location. It doesn't make sense that this area only suffers so much redness based purely on location. There are so many other cold regions.
    Last edited by Vovin; 8th October 2013 at 04:30 AM.

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    Senior Member Starlite's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vovin View Post
    If we are to believe that it is from cold and wind we should have to expect to see Russians with the same results, or other extremely cold regions. I'd be willing to speculate that Mongolians have certain genes that don't react well to cold climate, so it may be part genetics and part location. It doesn't make sense that this area only suffers so much redness based purely on location. There are so many other cold regions.
    HUmmm ... Eskimos! They have red cheeks but not as rashy.

    http://www.akapostille.com/images/es...alaska_197.jpg

    http://robertbone.com/lightbox/alask...es/eskimos.jpg

    You are correct! This is interesting. They live very similar lives, and have about the same melanin levels. My selection bias is in the way because I don't believe it's genetic in the way we think about it. We "inherit" but virtue of close contact our relatives flora and fauna and I believe that may be the issue. Like I said... selection bias.

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    Tibetans who live in Tibet also have very red cheeks. Their cheeks return to their "normal" color when they settle in a warmer country (after having to escape Tibet unfortunately). In regions where temperatures go extremly low, people develop more vasculature and thus more heat on their face to prevent frosbite. That's a biological response to the environnement. But to me, that does not mean they have rosacea. They do not have flushing burning or even P&P's the way we do. In their case, it is not inflammatory.

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    Senior Member Starlite's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Souris24 View Post
    Tibetans who live in Tibet also have very red cheeks. Their cheeks return to their "normal" color when they settle in a warmer country (after having to escape Tibet unfortunately). In regions where temperatures go extremly low, people develop more vasculature and thus more heat on their face to prevent frosbite. That's a biological response to the environnement. But to me, that does not mean they have rosacea. They do not have flushing burning or even P&P's the way we do. In their case, it is not inflammatory.
    Good insight.

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    And I shall add that if these people loose their very red cheeks when living in a warmer country, it is the very proof that, even when well installed, a dense vasculature can regress on its own with the right conditions. They don't have to receive lazer treatments. In other words, if we can find and beat the cause of rosacea and angiogenesis, our skin may be able to return to its pre-rosacea state without lazer therapy.
    Just an opinion.

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    Senior Member gizzy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Starlite View Post
    Isn't this new medication that just came out sort'a creating the same conditions for the facial skin; chronic loss of circulation and nutritive blood supply?
    I agree. This is what I worry about as when I am out in the cold/wind my face goes paler but then red once i'm in a warmer environment. Keep doing this and finally the blood vessels seem to become exhausted so this is maybe why people living in colder climates have redder cheeks because the blood vessels can't handle anymore constriction/dilation so this does indeed make me feel a little nervous about the new medication..especially with the rebounds going on as it's almost as if you're coming indoors from a winters day :/

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    Senior Member nat007's Avatar
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    Yeh good spot I wanted to make a blog post about why Mongolians have such red cheeks some day, but there is little information available on this topi. Found also plenty of pictures of red faced Mongolians. One website wrote about it: "And Mongolian cheeks are known to be pink or red, but that is due to the harsh weather conditions of Mongolia". But I also think there is a gene at play. Like some said, its just as cold in northern Russia and nothern Scandinavia and you don't see this distinguished bright red cheeks not so regularly in them. Also, I always assumed tanned skin is thicker and protects people from the redness showing through, but that is not the case with some Mongolians.
    The big question for me is however: do they feel their faces burning yes or no? In my home region there are so many farmers with very red cheeks who have absolutely no pain from it. Who don't even feel their red faces, maybe because it is a very superficial redness? So curious if the Mongolians with red cheeks feel anything of it.

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