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Thread: Fluorescent lighting

  1. #1
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    Default Fluorescent lighting

    Is it just me, or does fluorescent lighting induce a flush in other people. Im not sure if its an actual flush caused by the lights in some form, or wether its a psychological flush from feeling that your red skin is more obvious

  2. #2
    Senior Member tryingtogetoverit's Avatar
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    Im not sure if its an actual flush caused by the lights in some form, or wether its a psychological flush from feeling that your red skin is more obvious
    Great question! One I've been wondering about, too.
    I think it's a little bit of both, in my case. My skin looks and "feels" worse when I'm in that type of lighting, and since the redness is much more obvious, it probably makes me get nervous/anxious about it and makes my skin even redder. I don't really mind the look of my skin when I'm home...the lighting is better...whenever I'm in public and take a glance at myself I freak myself out thinking "Is it really this bad!?"

    Fluorescent lighting should be banned if only because it isn't flattering no matter what lol
    ------------------------------
    25 year old male, 20mgs Accutane daily.
    10mg's of Singulair daily (bonus that it helps with my asthma! lol)

    Shave w/ Aveeno Therapeutic Shave Gel, Sensor Excel razor. (Used to use Mach3, but tried Sensor and won't go back!)

  3. #3
    Junior Member AmandainAtlanta's Avatar
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    Default flourescent lighting

    Hi folks-

    I too have the same problem with fluorescent lights. I have been wearing pinkish tinted glasses (no prescription) indoors for about a month now. Seems to have helped some. My opthalmologist said yellow tinted lenses would be best to try.

    Here is an awesome post from Dr. Nase on the topic:

    Hello Group,

    Very intriguing subject. Yes, fluorescent lighting is a very common
    trigger for rosacea flares. However, if you ask a dermatologist or
    rosacea specialist about this trigger, they will say they never
    heard of it and dismiss it off the cuff. The derms just don't
    understand triggers like these. During my doctoral work my lab and
    office was stacked with fluorescent lighting. After complaining
    about this trigger to 25 to 30 dermatologists and getting the blow
    off, I finally did some research and found out that the best doctor
    to talk to was a highly specialized eye doctor called a neuro-
    opthalmologist,

    I set up a time to interview the doctor and he immediately knew what
    I was talking about. Fluorescent lighting has some properties in it
    that when it penetrates the eye and is transduced back through the
    optic nerve, it excites the visual cortex of the brain (normal
    action), but also alters the production of two chemicals in the
    anterior hypothalamus norepinephrine and gabba (not normal).

    These chemicals then stimulate dilatory nerve fibers to the face
    and also releases cortisol, a dilatory hormone; hence rosacea
    flushing. In the normal population fluorescent lighting is a common
    trigger for migraines and cluster headaches because of the changes
    caused to norepinephrine and gabba (blood brain vessels dilate, but
    they don't flush because they don't have rosacea). So, fluorescent
    lighting does not induce a rosacea trigger via direct interaction
    with facial skin, but is in fact a visual cortex processing affect.

    During my doctoral work, studying in the lab 10 to 12 hours a day
    was killing my rosacea. So, I have some suggestions that worked
    quite well for me during that time period:

    1. If you can, remove all the fluorescent light bulbs overhead your
    work area and replace them with normal light bulbs (which do not
    change those two brain chemicals). I did this in my office and it
    was wonderful.

    2. If you cant do the above, remove every other fluorescent light
    bulb to decrease the total light penetrating the eye. I did this in
    my lab and it made a difference.

    3. If you cant do any of the above, order a pair of non-corrective
    glasses with various shading that are specially made for indoors.
    This works and is highly recommended by the neuro-opthalmologist
    for his patients that get migraines or headaches from fluorescent
    lighting but cannot remove the light system. Be sure to order the
    shaded glasses that are designed for indoor lighting as they don't
    interfere with vision and in fact usually brighten/sharpen the
    contrast of indoor material due to multiple mechanisms.

    The real take home story is that I don't think a single
    dermatologist or rosacea specialist has ever heard of this trigger
    or immediately dismisses it. This is a real trigger. This is a
    common trigger. This reaction is a physiological one (not a
    psychological one) that is caused by the simple excitation of two
    chemicals in the anterior hypothalamus.

    Hope that helps some.

    Regards,

    Geoffrey
    ______________________________

    Dr. Geoffrey Nase
    Ph.D. Neurovascular Physiologist
    http://www.drnase
    Current regimen:
    .5 mg clonidine 3x daily
    Genteal drops
    klonopin and inderal as needed

    Past treatments: erythromycin, minocycline, metrolotion, elidel, protopic, IPLs, Loprox, clindamycin, blephamide, azelic acid, capex

  4. #4
    Senior Member tryingtogetoverit's Avatar
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    That is very interesting and helpful. Thanks for posting that.

    (Off topic, but I can't stop saying how glad I am to have found this forum, I'm learning so much! It's so great to get a better understanding of all of this stuff!)

    Orion
    ------------------------------
    25 year old male, 20mgs Accutane daily.
    10mg's of Singulair daily (bonus that it helps with my asthma! lol)

    Shave w/ Aveeno Therapeutic Shave Gel, Sensor Excel razor. (Used to use Mach3, but tried Sensor and won't go back!)

  5. #5
    Senior Member Ghost's Avatar
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    I'm not surprised that the neuro-opthalmologist knew the connection between fluorescent light and rosacea. My simple story is that while none of my derms ever used the "R" word to identify my conditon, an opthalmologist did noting my variety of dry eye and saying that it's common to people with rosacea. You could have knocked me over with a feather.

    Ghost

  6. #6
    Senior Member tryingtogetoverit's Avatar
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    I went to a few opthalmologists today...only one knew the rosacea aspect but they all knew about the headaches and sensitivities from fluorescent lighting.

    They showed me the lenses they use...very light rose/pink color. If you set the lense down on a white surface, you could see a faint (very faint) rose color, but otherwise it was invisible.
    They also said they could use an anti-glare coating if I was REALLY dead set against pink. I asked if I got both if it would provide cumulative benefits but they couldn't say for certain. One of them said yes, but what affect it had on my rosacea she didn't say.
    The same opthalmologist said she prefered a peach/yellow shade, although the pink is fine too. I'm just wondering how effective this would be at reducing irritation on the actual eye?

    I'm going to pick out some frames and get the lenses...I'm going to ask my derm first, but it's unlikely he'll be able to tell me which shade would be best.

    Orion
    ------------------------------
    25 year old male, 20mgs Accutane daily.
    10mg's of Singulair daily (bonus that it helps with my asthma! lol)

    Shave w/ Aveeno Therapeutic Shave Gel, Sensor Excel razor. (Used to use Mach3, but tried Sensor and won't go back!)

  7. #7
    Junior Member AmandainAtlanta's Avatar
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    I went with the pink lenses too. My eyes definitely bother me a lot less with them. I also asked at Lenscrafters about getting anti-glare coating, but they said you could not do both. Not sure why. The guy at Lenscrafters said the fluorescent lights bother him and he just has the coating. (But I don't think rosacea).

    My opthalmologist said yellow lenses too. Just see what works best for you!
    Amanda
    Current regimen:
    .5 mg clonidine 3x daily
    Genteal drops
    klonopin and inderal as needed

    Past treatments: erythromycin, minocycline, metrolotion, elidel, protopic, IPLs, Loprox, clindamycin, blephamide, azelic acid, capex

  8. #8
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    Hello Amanda,

    Glad to hear your glasses are helping your eyes. Have they protected your face from flushing under the florescent lights as well?

    Tamara

  9. #9
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    yeah florescent lighting is probably my in my Top 5 flushing tiggers, along with hot rooms, sunlight and stress. The worst feeling in the world is when you are in a small room like an office and the whole entire ceiling is full of those damn florescent lights. And to top it off, the temperture in the room is hotter than hell. That is the ultimate trigger for me.

  10. #10
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    Hi,

    Funny...just yesterday a few of us at work were talking about how much the fluorescent lighting in the building bother our eyes.
    I was the only one who had problems with the lights causing burning and flushing of the face and neck.
    But, the one thing I did notice is that all of us had a red, yucky looking face cause by the lighting. And I'm the only one with rosacea in the building.

    Thanks for the tip on the glasses this should really help and since all of us dislike the lights we are getting a lot of them removed.

    One question....does anyone have problem with burning sensations/flushing from using your computer? I think the screen is causing me some problems....anyone else?

    Thanks,
    Sharon

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