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Thread: Can rhinophyma be completely treated by surgery?

  1. #1
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    Default Can rhinophyma be completely treated by surgery?

    Dear all,

    i am a 26years male and was diagnosed with seborrheic dermatitis twice and rosacea once.
    My nose is not showing deformity yet, just a few dilated vessels( barely visible, need to be close to the mirror to notice).

    Because of what i have read online, i am extremely worried that I may have to deal with a deformed nose later in my life.

    So i am hoping you guys could let me know if surgery could completely restore the appearance after having developed rhinophyma because of rosacea.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onelove View Post
    Dear all,

    i am a 26years male and was diagnosed with seborrheic dermatitis twice and rosacea once.
    My nose is not showing deformity yet, just a few dilated vessels( barely visible, need to be close to the mirror to notice).

    Because of what i have read online, i am extremely worried that I may have to deal with a deformed nose later in my life.

    So i am hoping you guys could let me know if surgery could completely restore the appearance after having developed rhinophyma because of rosacea.
    First off, Subtype 3 is not common and is especially rare in women. Past literature says that rosacea develops into rhinophyma but there is no evidence to support this. Untreated rosacea MAY develop into rhinophyma. The good news about rhinophyma is that it is treatable and the success rate is high. The latest literature says surgery is still the most popular choice. For more info.
    Brady Barrows
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    First off, Subtype 3 is not common and is especially rare in women. Past literature says that rosacea develops into rhinophyma but there is no evidence to support this. Untreated rosacea MAY develop into rhinophyma. The good news about rhinophyma is that it is treatable and the success rate is high. The latest literature says surgery is still the most popular choice..
    Hi,
    I am a male.
    Noted from you saying that it is a rare type.(a bit relieved)
    So is it safe to say that if a patient has it in the future, via surgeries his nose could be restored to the completely formal shape?
    I just don't understand. The nose seems to enlarge as a whole in these patients whereas the surgery works through removing extra tissues on the outer layer of skin. How is it done actually?
    thanks

  4. #4
    Senior Member Brady Barrows's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by onelove View Post
    Hi,
    I am a male.
    Noted from you saying that it is a rare type.(a bit relieved)
    So is it safe to say that if a patient has it in the future, via surgeries his nose could be restored to the completely formal shape?
    I just don't understand. The nose seems to enlarge as a whole in these patients whereas the surgery works through removing extra tissues on the outer layer of skin. How is it done actually?
    thanks
    Might want to discuss this with your doctor. Cosmetic surgery works wonders. You just need to get the best surgeon to do the job and don't forget to bring lots of money. If you read the post I referred to, there are a number of different treatments for this, including cryosurgery, dermashaving and electrosurgery. It has been suggested that taking Accutane and antibiotics help. Just because your nose is red doesn't mean you have rhinophyma. There hasn't been any real study done on the percentage of rosacea sufferers who develop subtype 3, but the odds are low. The whole subtype classification system is controversial but is a beginning which doctors can argue about. The RRDi is the only non profit organization that recognizes demodectic rosacea as a rosacea variant which has more suffering in terms of numbers (note how many in this forum report cases of this variant) than subtype 3. Subtype 3 gets a lot of limelight but few in this forum report having it. I wouldn't worry about it unless your dermatologist says you have it.
    Brady Barrows
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    Thanks Brady.
    I could relax a bit.

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    onelove, this might interest you:

    http://rosacea-support.org/coblation...a-miracle.html

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrlhamcat2 View Post
    onelove, this might interest you:
    wow, are they the same person?
    on the right side his nose is completely normal

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    The type of medicine your doctor recommends will depend on how your skin looks. Treatment generally works best at improving the pimples and bumps of rosacea. The redness of the skin is harder to treat. Medicines used to treat rosacea include antibiotics, which can be applied to the skin or taken as pills. Your doctor may recommend an oral antibiotic to start with and follow that with an antibiotic gel or cream called metronidazole (one brand name: MetroGel) that you apply to your skin.

    It may take up to 2 months of treatment before the skin looks better. As your skin improves, the amount of oral antibiotic you take can often be cut down or stopped. Treatment with the gel may continue. It is hard to know how long you will need treatment for rosacea. Each person's skin is different, and your doctor may want to adjust your treatment.

    Surgery may be used to correct rhinophyma. Enlarged blood vessels on your face can sometimes be removed by using a fine electric needle or with laser surgery.

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