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Thread: Xylitol better than sugar?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brady Barrows View Post
    The other factor about flushing is hormones and it might not be the niacin at all. It would take a scientific clinical study to figure out what is causing the flushing. Wish Dr. House and his team could figure it out, huh?

    Do you think that females tend to flush more than males in the general population?
    Reason why I know it's niacin for my personal case is that when I ate more meat, I started flushing. When I stopped eating that high quantity of meat, I stopped flushing. There is no other time when I flush, whether it's a 'certain time of the month' or a time of day or anything that would suggest hormones.

    Not sure if there is a significant difference between male and female flushing as I've seen on here, both equally seem to have problems, whether from certain foods like pizza, wine, cheese, or exercise, heat, or otherwise. Now as far as the unexplainable flushing, the ones that just seem to happen at certain times of day, perhaps hormones have some role to play in that. But then again, not all female rosaceans have unexplainable flushing, same as males. I know I have a very high testosterone level for a female as I can pack on the muscle with very little effort and am just generally more masculine in all aspects. Perhaps people with high levels of estrogen have more difficulty with that, as my father is developing rosacea now and his testosterone levels are running a third of what they should be, so his testosterone/estrogen levels are favoring estrogen by quite a bit. Coincidence that he is developing rosacea around the same time? Who knows.
    Current skincare regime for rosacea subtypes I, II and IV started March, 2012:

    *Strict diet. No dairy, wheat, sugar, nuts/seeds, legumes. Only meat, 'safe starches', and low-phenol starchy/unstarchy fruits and veggies and water with ghee, lard and duck fat as cooking aids and sources of fat. Also avoiding food intolerances.
    Supplementing with raw food multivitamin, liquid zinc sulfate with copper, epsom salt baths (magnesium sulfate), calcium and vitamin C. Lots of water!

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by christine123 View Post
    Reason why I know it's niacin for my personal case is that when I ate more meat, I started flushing. When I stopped eating that high quantity of meat, I stopped flushing. There is no other time when I flush, whether it's a 'certain time of the month' or a time of day or anything that would suggest hormones.

    Not sure if there is a significant difference between male and female flushing as I've seen on here, both equally seem to have problems, whether from certain foods like pizza, wine, cheese, or exercise, heat, or otherwise. Now as far as the unexplainable flushing, the ones that just seem to happen at certain times of day, perhaps hormones have some role to play in that. But then again, not all female rosaceans have unexplainable flushing, same as males. I know I have a very high testosterone level for a female as I can pack on the muscle with very little effort and am just generally more masculine in all aspects. Perhaps people with high levels of estrogen have more difficulty with that, as my father is developing rosacea now and his testosterone levels are running a third of what they should be, so his testosterone/estrogen levels are favoring estrogen by quite a bit. Coincidence that he is developing rosacea around the same time? Who knows.
    Men who have too much estrogen compared to testosterone are prone to hot flashes which can lead to rosacea which is probably what your father is experiencing. Its called "manopause" (male menopause)

  3. #23
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    In fact, now that I think about it, it's rather interesting that they say the most common age for rosacea to set in is around 40-50, correct? Isn't this around the time when hormone levels start fluctuating in people? Like, perhaps pre-menopausal where estrogen levels drop for women and a surge of estrogen (due to overweight, muscle loss or otherwise) for men? I've always had low levels of estrogen since I was young and my rosacea symptoms started when I was about 14. Women often say fluctuating hormone levels throughout the month wreak havoc on their rosacea.

    It'd be interesting if there was a link between abnormal hormone levels, whether estrogen or testosterone, as that can cause a whole range of problems, and rosacea.
    Current skincare regime for rosacea subtypes I, II and IV started March, 2012:

    *Strict diet. No dairy, wheat, sugar, nuts/seeds, legumes. Only meat, 'safe starches', and low-phenol starchy/unstarchy fruits and veggies and water with ghee, lard and duck fat as cooking aids and sources of fat. Also avoiding food intolerances.
    Supplementing with raw food multivitamin, liquid zinc sulfate with copper, epsom salt baths (magnesium sulfate), calcium and vitamin C. Lots of water!

  4. #24
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    Interesting discussion this
    Another one of my many issues is excessive sebum production. And I mean EXCESSIVE!
    When it first started Id been living with seb derm for 12 years. 3 months after the sebum issue I got rosacea.

    They say over production of sebum is from high testosterone, which is related to adrenaline isn't it?
    I've been wanting to have a hormone test for a long time but thought they wouldn't take me seriously.

    For me the sebum is a big problem. It feeds the seb derm yeasts. And when the seb derm is bad, increased inflammation makes the rosacea worse. When my nose flushes the amount of sebum is unbelievable. Not pretty!

    Interestingly, and sadly, my sister now has rosacea. She is 34 and I'm 30. Hers may have been creeping in a while but became very apparent when she had her first child a year ago.
    So there does appear to be a hereditary genetic factor, but also a hormonal factor

  5. #25
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    This seems to be describing me!
    http://www.rosacea-ltd-flushing.com/adrenaline.php4

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by flemmo View Post
    Another one of my many issues is excessive sebum production. And I mean EXCESSIVE!

    They say over production of sebum is from high testosterone, which is related to adrenaline isn't it?
    Interestingly enough, I have always had a problem with my nose being excessively oily. Not really anywhere else, but if I run my finger along my nose, it's like I dipped the tip of it in a jug of oil (I know, sounds so appealing...) With my high testosterone levels, that makes sense when I read what you wrote. But about the high adrenaline, I'm not sure about myself.

    What you said about your sister just reinforces my fear of getting pregnant. I'm having a hard enough time managing my skin at a barely decent level as it is. I don't want to go through all this hardship, of denying myself eating anything but the fewest foods, working so hard to avoid triggers, etc, and then all of a sudden all my work is undone and more because I'm pregnant and there's nothing I can do about it. I'd be devastated.
    Current skincare regime for rosacea subtypes I, II and IV started March, 2012:

    *Strict diet. No dairy, wheat, sugar, nuts/seeds, legumes. Only meat, 'safe starches', and low-phenol starchy/unstarchy fruits and veggies and water with ghee, lard and duck fat as cooking aids and sources of fat. Also avoiding food intolerances.
    Supplementing with raw food multivitamin, liquid zinc sulfate with copper, epsom salt baths (magnesium sulfate), calcium and vitamin C. Lots of water!

  7. #27
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    Hi Christine,
    I think you'd be so preoccupied with a new baby you'd forget all about your skin
    I've heard many people saying the opposite - that their skin improves once pregnant. I think its just luck of the draw.

  8. #28
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    Default Atkins and Rosacea

    Has anyone seen any big differences between Atkins diet and Rosacea diet? I remember being on the Atkins diet for a year or so and not having much Rosacea. When I went back to eating more carbs I noticed my skin began to get red. I'm not sure if was because of going off the diet or my Rosacea was just getting worse.

    I am thinking about trying out a low carb diet. I didn't really mind dong Atkins. I read the Rosacea diet and didn't see much of a difference. Is there anyone here who knows both of them? Do you know of any differences?

    Has anyone talked to their dermatologist about diet and Rosacea? Are there any dermatologists who believe that diet can help with Rosacea symptoms?

    Lisa

  9. #29
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    flemmo: That may be true, but since I don't even want a baby that doesn't seem like the best trade-off to me.
    Current skincare regime for rosacea subtypes I, II and IV started March, 2012:

    *Strict diet. No dairy, wheat, sugar, nuts/seeds, legumes. Only meat, 'safe starches', and low-phenol starchy/unstarchy fruits and veggies and water with ghee, lard and duck fat as cooking aids and sources of fat. Also avoiding food intolerances.
    Supplementing with raw food multivitamin, liquid zinc sulfate with copper, epsom salt baths (magnesium sulfate), calcium and vitamin C. Lots of water!

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by windycity View Post
    Has anyone seen any big differences between Atkins diet and Rosacea diet? I remember being on the Atkins diet for a year or so and not having much Rosacea. When I went back to eating more carbs I noticed my skin began to get red. I'm not sure if was because of going off the diet or my Rosacea was just getting worse.

    I am thinking about trying out a low carb diet. I didn't really mind dong Atkins. I read the Rosacea diet and didn't see much of a difference. Is there anyone here who knows both of them? Do you know of any differences?

    Has anyone talked to their dermatologist about diet and Rosacea? Are there any dermatologists who believe that diet can help with Rosacea symptoms?

    Lisa
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