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Thread: started honey treatment. honey storage question..

  1. #1
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    Default started honey treatment. honey storage question..

    Hello fellow Seb Derm sufferers,

    I am at my wits end with this disease and have finally decided to give this honey treatment a try.

    I've had Seb Derm for 2 years now and a year in with the disease I wasn't even sure what I had until I was diagnosed. My seb derm has changed character over the last 24 months as well and itís becoming more and more stubborn and I haven't been able to clear it at all for the last 2 months.

    I live in a warm and humid climate where the temperature stays between 80-90 degrees all year around. My question is therefore how I should store the honey in order to keep the enzymes alive. I've done two masks so far, the first which I could feel a lot of itching and "activity" while the mask was on. I then stored the honey in the fridge between the first and second mask as I thought it might be to warm in the cupboard. Though, when I did the second mask I really didn't feel anything. Will storing the honey in the fridge kill the enzymes or am I just getting used to it? I am a little worried though as it was only my second mask and I expected to feel it working more.

    Is it ok to store it there or do I need to get another jar of honey?
    If so I am a little perplexed as to how I should store it. Sure, I blast the AC when Iím at home but the rest of the day my place gets pretty hot, especially in the kitchen.
    Thanks,
    Adm_k

  2. #2
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    I also live in a very and hot and humid climate, same temp as yours. I only started the honey treatment a few days ago, but I keep it in the cupboard and the coconut oil in the fridge. I think freezing the honey would kill the enzymes.

  3. #3
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    what i've read is that temperatures over 105 degrees F (40 C) are bad for the enzymes, but i don't know about cold. i'd aim for keeping it in the same kind of temperature range that bees keep it when it's in their good hands.

    (hm - do bees have hands? it's too early for metaphors )

    if it's over 105/40 in your house during the day but how about keeping the honey in some kind of cooler? if you don't own a cooler, a makeshift one wouldn't be hard to set up
    Last edited by dora; 6th April 2011 at 06:55 AM.

  4. #4
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    Hi all

    Regular honey gets too runny when hot, and rock hard and unusable when cold. Honevo, the one that I have developed and tested and posted on this board, has an additional natural ingredient which makes it temperature stable.

    However, if the Honevo gets really cold, such as during shipping and is easily fixed - simply put the tube in hot water for 5 minutes and it will become a lovely smooth honey again.

    Yes, you are correct about the enzymes...but it is still effective, we know this because the trial used medical-grade honey that was pasteurised as part of the manufacturing process.

    All the best

    Shaun

  5. #5
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    I've wondered a few things similarly about raw honey. I seem to only find the stuff in jars which is annoying because I have to spoon it out. I get nervous about using a spoon because it has been washed with tap water which supposedly kills enzymes. Does anyone have suggestions on a more convenient method to using this often? I was thinking maybe buying a bunch of plastic spoons and just using a new one every day. I really I could find raw honey I could trust was actually raw that was in a dispenser bottle of some sort.

  6. #6
    Junior Member Jayco89's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flurb View Post
    I've wondered a few things similarly about raw honey. I seem to only find the stuff in jars which is annoying because I have to spoon it out. I get nervous about using a spoon because it has been washed with tap water which supposedly kills enzymes. Does anyone have suggestions on a more convenient method to using this often? I was thinking maybe buying a bunch of plastic spoons and just using a new one every day. I really I could find raw honey I could trust was actually raw that was in a dispenser bottle of some sort.
    Wouldn't worry too much about the spoon killing enzymes, as long as it's washed and dried thoroughly it should be fine. My raw honey was runny when I first started and it took about 4 weeks to become a bit more solid; I personally saw little to no success with it, but occasionally use it as a wash / mask. But currently trialling some other stuff!

    Good idea to heat it up in some warm water. Just make sure the water isn't too much much above 30įC, otherwise the enzymes might begin to break down.

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