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Thread: SURVEY | Effectiveness of light therapy for rosacea and/or seborrheic dermatitis

  1. #1
    Senior Member findingaway's Avatar
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    Default SURVEY | Effectiveness of light therapy for rosacea and/or seborrheic dermatitis

    Hi,

    I have created a Survey Monkey to gauge the effectiveness of light therapy for rosacea and/or seborrheic dermatitis.

    It's 10 questions, everything from skin type, symptoms before treatment to effectiveness of treatment and side effects (if any).

    I wanted to make the survey results available to all at the click of a button at the outset, but it'll cost 24 a month to do that, so I will just have to release the info periodically - unless someone has a better idea. I would do a poll on here, but the options are too limited.

    Anyway, would really appreciate your responses as it could potentially help a lot of people. And please tell me if you think any of it needs changing!

    http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/TDFK7LV

  2. #2
    Senior Member Rand627's Avatar
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    Just so you know, people are going to have to control copy the address to their address bar. The hyperlink doesn't work.

  3. #3
    Senior Member findingaway's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rand627 View Post
    Just so you know, people are going to have to control copy the address to their address bar. The hyperlink doesn't work.
    Thanks for pointing that out

    I'll try again: http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/TDFK7LV

    Or click here

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    Senior Member Rand627's Avatar
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    No problem! I would take it but I've never used a RLT before. Definitely thinking about buying one though so I'll have to check out the results.

  5. #5
    Senior Member findingaway's Avatar
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    Me too. Whats putting you off?

    For me it's -
    • Will it damage my eyes?
    • Improve my SD or make it worse?
    • Do I need infrared?
    • What's the best light wavelength (I've heard it said that 620-640nm is the most effective)
    • Will it make my skin dryer as it stops the skin producing so much oil?

  6. #6
    Senior Member Rand627's Avatar
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    Mostly the price. If I did buy one it would be the portable 140 or so dollar one from the LEDman place.

    As far as I've heard red is by far the most commonly used and supposedly the most convenient. Infrared is kind of an extra that works for some and doesnt for others.

    If I had to buy a single unit with a single LED type it would definitely be red. I don't have SD so I don't have to worry about that.

  7. #7
    Senior Member findingaway's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rand627 View Post
    If I didIf I had to buy a single unit with a single LED type it would definitely be red. I don't have SD so I don't have to worry about that.
    Lucky you

    I am swinging torwards the LEDman too. Yeah, they are pricey!

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    Just bumping this thread up for you

  9. #9
    Senior Member findingaway's Avatar
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    Default Future research

    Quote Originally Posted by phlika29 View Post
    Just bumping this thread up for you
    Thank you!

    I don't suppose you could fix the link in the first post could you?

    PS - By complete chance had a conversation with a scientist this afternoon. Couldn't believe my luck. I was on the phone for nearly an hour and a half!

    EYES

    In a nutshell, he basically said that all light wavelengths are OK to use with your eyes closed - infrared and blue and all. BUT - not UV!! AND - don't stare at blue, cos that will damage your eyes after a few minutes.

    It makes sense as you can comfortably stare directly at the sun with your eyes closed although I wouldn't recommend trying this.

    ALTERNATIVE RED / INFRARED

    I don't know all the detail yet, but basically red and infrared have different effects and can compliment each other. Although by no means perfect, they have been experimenting with a protocol and found that light therapy is more effective if you use red light and infrared alternatively.

    As I say I don't know the ratio, but for arguments sake lets say 2 days red, one day infrared. This way, they help each other to heal the skin (i'm talking really basic terms here!)

    POWER OUTPUT

    He also said that the other element everyone misses out on is the Joules of the units. It might be the right wavelength, such as 633-660mn or 830-880mn but only have 1-2 Joules, which means you'll be there all day and not really get a result. He said that the range should be between 50-70 Joules for it to be of benefit over say a 15 minute period.

    WAVELENGTHS

    In terms of the ranges, optimum range for collagen production is 633mn and optimum range for infrared is 830mn - BUT, it really isn't going to make much odds if you unit is 660mn or 880mn.

    SEBORRHEIC DERMATITIS

    In terms of Seborrheic Dermatitis, he said he wasn't sure what might help, however in his opinion he said blue light (nearer to violet) might be best. Now this makes sense as if you think about it, sun bathing usually helps SD, so getting nearer the UV range (without the UV) may help.

    OCULAR ROSACEA

    Blue, red and infrared is most likely going to help Ocular Rosacea. Interestingly, blue light will kill some bacteria that causes the inflammation in acne. Acne is caused because of overly oily skin, bacteria thrive and thus cause spots and inflammation. I believe the blue, red and infrared lights do this by the body producing an extra oxygen, which as it is on it's own, will desperately want to attach to another molecule, so attaches to the bacteria changing it's form and killing it - not 100% that is 100% correct, but it's something like that.

    Basically, if lets take the meibomian glands for are blocked because of bacteria build up - which I believe they are (see below and here: http://www.dryeyezone.com/talk/showt...8157#post58157)...then, it is reasonable to assume that the blue/red/infrared may help to kill the bacteria in the same way! Here hopes.

    Below is from a post on the dry eye forum - and he is actually talking about an eye drop called Azasite, but the science of what he is saying is interesting.

    Quote Originally Posted by Diana View Post
    Moore778899,
    Azasite is azithromycin, a next-generation erythromycin that kills staph aureus and a few other bacteria. Staph aureus is the normal bacteria that is on the skin and mucous membranes of the body. Staph is the main culprit in colonization of the meibomian glands caused by oils that move more slowly from the glands, thereby becoming a food source for the bacteria. The bacteria's waste products then further harden and stop movement of the oils, so that they're solid at room temperature when they should be liquid at room temperature. (kind of like trans-fats--naturally liquid but altered in the lab to be solid at room temperature) Colonization takes a long time to eradicate but I think I finally killed off enough of the staph by being on Azasite long term to be comfortable again with improved flow of liquid oils.
    ROSACEA

    Now, Rosacea. He said that they had done some pilot studies, but they were not prepared to say it helped Rosacea. Which was a little disappointing - but hey, if people on this forum are anything to go by, it's worth a shot! He did say that is had helped people with Rosacea though. I guess it didn't help everyone!

    SIDE EFFECTS

    I was also a little worried that RLT would dry out the skin as it supposedly stops the sebaceous glands from producing so much oil. Remembering that oily skin is skin that ages best and slowest, you want some oil. Dry skin will ironically lead to wrinkles and aged skin quicker then oily skin. BUT again, there are many more factors, diet, UV exposure, stress levels etc. He said IPL on a regular basis could lead to dry skin as it destroys the skin to produce a very effective result in many cases, but RTL does not destroy the skin at all and therefore there is no risk of overly dry skin.

    RESEARCH

    Now - this is not the firm I talked with or will be going with, but they do have some good links on their site. Here is a link to the research page: http://www.britebox-skin-rejuvenatio...n-research.php

    Anyway - hope that helps!

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    Quote Originally Posted by moore778899 View Post
    Thank you!

    I don't suppose you could fix the link in the first post could you?

    PS - By complete chance had a conversation with a scientist this afternoon. Couldn't believe my luck. I was on the phone for nearly an hour and a half!

    EYES

    In a nutshell, he basically said that all light wavelengths are OK to use with your eyes closed - infrared and blue and all. BUT - not UV!! AND - don't stare at blue, cos that will damage your eyes after a few minutes.

    It makes sense as you can comfortably stare directly at the sun with your eyes closed although I wouldn't recommend trying this.

    ALTERNATIVE RED / INFRARED

    I don't know all the detail yet, but basically red and infrared have different effects and can compliment each other. Although by no means perfect, they have been experimenting with a protocol and found that light therapy is more effective if you use red light and infrared alternatively.

    As I say I don't know the ratio, but for arguments sake lets say 2 days red, one day infrared. This way, they help each other to heal the skin (i'm talking really basic terms here!)

    POWER OUTPUT

    He also said that the other element everyone misses out on is the Joules of the units. It might be the right wavelength, such as 633-660mn or 830-880mn but only have 1-2 Joules, which means you'll be there all day and not really get a result. He said that the range should be between 50-70 Joules for it to be of benefit over say a 15 minute period.

    WAVELENGTHS

    In terms of the ranges, optimum range for collagen production is 633mn and optimum range for infrared is 830mn - BUT, it really isn't going to make much odds if you unit is 660mn or 880mn.

    SEBORRHEIC DERMATITIS

    In terms of Seborrheic Dermatitis, he said he wasn't sure what might help, however in his opinion he said blue light (nearer to violet) might be best. Now this makes sense as if you think about it, sun bathing usually helps SD, so getting nearer the UV range (without the UV) may help.

    OCULAR ROSACEA

    Blue, red and infrared is most likely going to help Ocular Rosacea. Interestingly, blue light will kill some bacteria that causes the inflammation in acne. Acne is caused because of overly oily skin, bacteria thrive and thus cause spots and inflammation. I believe the blue, red and infrared lights do this by the body producing an extra oxygen, which as it is on it's own, will desperately want to attach to another molecule, so attaches to the bacteria changing it's form and killing it - not 100% that is 100% correct, but it's something like that.

    Basically, if lets take the meibomian glands for are blocked because of bacteria build up - which I believe they are (see below and here: http://www.dryeyezone.com/talk/showt...8157#post58157)...then, it is reasonable to assume that the blue/red/infrared may help to kill the bacteria in the same way! Here hopes.

    Below is from a post on the dry eye forum - and he is actually talking about an eye drop called Azasite, but the science of what he is saying is interesting.



    ROSACEA

    Now, Rosacea. He said that they had done some pilot studies, but they were not prepared to say it helped Rosacea. Which was a little disappointing - but hey, if people on this forum are anything to go by, it's worth a shot! He did say that is had helped people with Rosacea though. I guess it didn't help everyone!

    SIDE EFFECTS

    I was also a little worried that RLT would dry out the skin as it supposedly stops the sebaceous glands from producing so much oil. Remembering that oily skin is skin that ages best and slowest, you want some oil. Dry skin will ironically lead to wrinkles and aged skin quicker then oily skin. BUT again, there are many more factors, diet, UV exposure, stress levels etc. He said IPL on a regular basis could lead to dry skin as it destroys the skin to produce a very effective result in many cases, but RTL does not destroy the skin at all and therefore there is no risk of overly dry skin.

    RESEARCH

    Now - this is not the firm I talked with or will be going with, but they do have some good links on their site. Here is a link to the research page: http://www.britebox-skin-rejuvenatio...n-research.php

    Anyway - hope that helps!

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