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Thread: Low Stomach Acid...

  1. #1
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    Default Low Stomach Acid...

    Found this and thought I would post it as I know others have discussed Low Stomach Acid...

    STOMACH ACID ASSESSMENT


    For this test you will need some baking soda. The purpose of this test is to give us a rough indication as to whether your stomach is producing adequate amounts of hydrochloric acid. The most scientific test for assessment of hydrochloric acid levels is the Heidelberg test, although it is not foolproof. Gastrocaps can also be used to measure hydrochloric acid levels with good accuracy. Both these methods are somewhat cumbersome however, and involve a visit to a doctor for you to swallow a special capsule, which is used to measure acid levels.

    Hydrochloric acid is important for digestion and absorption of many nutrients. When hydrochloric acid is lacking (a condition termed hypochlorhydria), malnutrition results. At the same time, one can develop multiple food sensitivities as abnormally large, inadequately digested food particles are absorbed, triggering an immune response. Also, because hydrochloric acid kills many bacteria, yeasts, and parasites, its insufficiency is associated with greater incidence of dysbiosis (gastrointestinal infection). Hypochlorhydria is linked to not only gastrointestinal symptoms (including belching, gas, indigestion, poor appetite, prolonged fullness after meals, bloating, constipation, and diarrhea), but also to autoimmune diseases and degenerative diseases of all kinds. It is a major contributor to chronic unwellness that is under-appreciated. Although hypochlohydria can occur at any age, older individuals are especially effected. Some estimates suggest half of individuals over age 65 have inadequate stomach acid.

    To perform this test: mix one quarter teaspoon of baking soda in eight ounces of cold water, first thing in the morning, before eating or drinking anything except water. Drink the baking soda solution. Time how long it takes to belch. Time up to five minutes. If you have not belched within five minutes stop timing anyway.

    If your stomach is producing adequate amounts of hydrochloric acid you should probably belch within two to three minutes. Early and repeated belching may be due to excessive stomach acid. Belching results from the acid and baking soda reacting to form carbon dioxide gas. The Heidelberg or Gastrocap tests can be employed for confirmation of the results of this test.

    I also look for signs and symptoms of low stomach acid. There are many laboratory test indicators of this condition. Some of these include deficiencies of amino acids, minerals, B vitamins, and, on digestive analysis, elevated levels of putrefactive short chain fatty acids in the stool.

    I like to have patients do a therapeutic trial with supplemental betaine HCL (hydrochloric acid). If you take betaine HCL after a meal and feel nothing, your stomach is probably not producing enough hydrochloric acid. A normal response to taking betaine HCL is a feeling of warmth in the stomach.

    For an individual whose hydrochloric acid levels are lacking, I have them gradually work up to supplementing as many as 5 betaine HCL capsules after meals. Although this may sound like a lot, in response to a very big meal, a healthy stomach produces the equivalent of at least 14 betaine HCL capsules. For optimal results, the protein digesting enzyme, pepsin, should be part of the betaine HCL formulation. This is derived from animal sources and so is not appropriate for everyone. I recommend working with a qualified healthcare practitioner when it comes to betaine HCL.



    www.drdebe.com
    Doug

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    I now was reading where others suggest taking the HCL capsules before the meal and some suggest during the meal..

    So when is the best time?
    Doug

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    Default Another Article on Low Stomach Acid

    The Dangers of Low Stomach Acid


    If you suffer from bloating, gas, indigestion, heartburn and a host of other food related digestive issues (including diarrhea and constipation), you could be suffering from low stomach acid. If you are over forty years of age, there is a forty percent chance that you do.

    Most likely you have at one time or another taken an antacid or an acid-blocking medication before or after your meal to help with your suffering. If this is the case, you are doing exactly the opposite of what your body needs to alleviate the effects of low stomach acid.

    As strange as it sounds, the symptoms of low stomach acid are virtually the same as the symptoms of an overproduction of stomach acid. The treatment, however, is entirely different. In order to feel better, your stomach needs to produce more acid, not less.



    Low Stomach Acid (Hypochlorhydria) Symptoms
    Low stomach acid is a digestive disorder in which there is a low level of hydrochloric acid in the stomach. Also known as hypochlorhydria, gastric acidity reduced, hypohydrochloria, and achlorhydria.

    Low Acid Symptoms

    Bacterial/fungal overgrowth
    Bad breath
    Belching
    Bloating
    Diarrhea and constipation
    Distension
    Fatigue
    Food sensitivities
    A feeling of fullness
    Gas
    Headaches
    Heartburn
    Increased incidence of parasitic infections
    Indigestion
    Malabsorption problems
    Nausea
    Nutritional deficiency
    Rectal itching
    Stomach pain and distress
    Unexplained hunger
    Vomiting
    Weakened hair, nails, and skin
    yeast infections, and a host of other ailments.


    How Low Stomach Acid Wreaks Digestive Havoc
    Since our entire digestive process depends upon food being doused with a healthy amount of hydrochloric acid (HCL) when it gets to the stomach, it is difficult to exaggerate the potentially catastrophic results of a condition marked by an abnormally small amount of stomach acid.

    Without HCL, the digestion of protein, carbohydrates, and fat cannot be properly completed. The stomach needs hydrochloric acid in order to protect the stomach from bacterial and fungal overgrowth (bacteria and fungus cannot thrive in an acidic environment). Hydrochloric acid also helps the body to properly absorb essential vitamins and minerals.

    The presence of undigested food in the small intestine and colon can wreak digestive havoc by causing an overgrowth of harmful bacteria, which in turn produces toxins that are absorbed by the liver. This internal warfare puts a terrible strain on one of our most vital organs, forcing the liver to work twice as hard in order to detoxify itself.

    There is often a long transit time with low stomach acid, and we know that the longer bacteria sits inside us, the more rapidly they reproduce. Toxins are produced and then absorbed by the liver.

    Regardless of how well you eat, poor digestion and malabsorption of nutrients is the end result of low stomach acid. Without adequate nourishment, you will be a target for infectious and degenerative diseases.

    In addition, a toxic condition known as dysbiosis can result, leaving the sufferer with fatigue, gas, headaches, hypertension, insomnia, irritation, muscle aches and pain, personality changes, and many other problems.



    Diseases Associated with Low Stomach Acid
    A lot of what we eat contains bacteria. Normally, stomach acid kills harmful bacteria, working to keep diseases at bay. People with low stomach acid have a higher than average incidence of illness because harmful bacteria ends up in their small intestine, rather than being killed off by HCL in their stomachs.

    Often, without knowing why, people with low stomach acid simply never feel good. This is hardly surprising since many health problems are associated with low stomach acid.

    Conditions Linked to Low Stomach Acid include:

    Allergies
    Asthma
    Autoimmune diseases
    Chronic candida
    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)
    Chronic hepatitis
    Chronic hives
    Dry skin
    Eczema
    Gallbladder disease
    Gastrointestinal (GI) infections and parasites
    Hypoglycemia
    Lupus
    Osteoporosis
    Psoriasis
    Reduced night vision
    Rheumatic arthritis
    Rosacea
    Thyroid disorders
    Type I and II diabetes
    Vitiligo (a skin disorder characterized by white patches or spots)
    Weakened hair, nails, and skin


    What Causes Low Stomach Acid?
    Aging is one of the primary causes of low stomach acid. However, adrenal fatigue, alcohol consumption, bacterial infection, and chronic stress are also associated with this condition.



    Low stomach Acid Testing
    Low stomach acid has a history of not being taken seriously by the medical community. As a result, it is an often misdiagnosed and frequently under-diagnosed condition.

    Sometimes low stomach acid is simply left untreated; in other instances, the sufferer is prescribed copious amounts of antacids, in effect treating their symptoms as though they had too much HCL, rather than too little.

    Accurate testing is available. The Heidelberg Gastric Analysis test is a precise, if somewhat expensive, test that takes between one and two hours to complete.

    The patient swallows a vitamin-sized capsule containing a pH meter and radio transmitter. Next, a bicarbonate of soda solution is drunk in order to stimulate the release of stomach acid. Fluctuations in pH levels are transmitted to a receiver, and then graphed. The capsule is excreted normally.

    Accurate testing is vital with low stomach acid as this digestive problem can be confused with gastric ulcers and hyperacidity, conditions associated with too much HCL in the stomach.

    Typically, one will notice indigestion and discomfort immediately following a meal with low stomach acid and will notice discomfort 1-6 hours after a meal with an overproduction of acid (even waking one in the night.)

    Some home testing can also be done at your own risk...If you have tried antacids and acid-blocking medications, and they don't seem to work for you, try drinking one to two tablespoons of pure apple cider vinegar (or mix it with a small amount of water in order to swallow) when you are suffering from indigestion. If this soothes your indigestion, you most probably have low stomach acid.



    Treating Low Stomach Acid

    Once a diagnosis has been made, you may elect to tackle low stomach acid with a multi-pronged approach.

    Betaine HCL supplements containing thirty or forty milligrams of pepsin are highly encouraged.1 When taken with meals, betaine can help produce stomach acid, alleviating the immediate issue. Long-term use of betaine can help your stomach produce more stomach acid on its own.


    In addition to supplements, incorporating foods containing betaine into your diet can help your body produce more stomach acid. Dietary sources of betaine include beets, broccoli, spinach, and inexpensive wines.2 People who've suffered for years with low stomach acid have been known to have immediate, life changing results with betaine HCL.


    Dieticians, nutritionists and many naturopaths recommend everyone over the age of forty take a digestive enzyme supplement on a daily basis. For greater overall digestion, digestive enzyme supplements taken with meals are recommended. Choose a digestive enzyme that includes betaine HCL, to maximum effectiveness.


    When using antibiotics or while experiencing digestive disruptions such as low stomach acid, probiotic supplements create a healthy environment within the GI tract. A high quality intestinal flora replacement can assist in treating digestive disorders and intestinal yeast infections (Candida), and may help your body to resist the myriad of diseases caused by harmful bacteria.3


    Supplementary, biweekly intramuscular injections of vitamin B12 for a three-week period is often medically recommended; consult your health care provider.


    Ginger is a classic tonic for the digestive tract. It stimulates digestion and keeps the intestinal muscles toned, a key factor in speeding up transit time. Ginger is also recommended for fighting parasites such as the roundworm and the blood fluke.
    Doug

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    I have a number of conditions which from looking at forums might be caused by low stomach acid. It does seem quite coincidental that they all may be caused by it so I do think theres something in this.

    Im seeing a herbalist and am on a detox at the moment, I also take Betaine HCl, I take ropinerole (for RLS) and omaprazole for heartburn, after reading this I understand the heartburn from low acid and will be stopping taking that one from now on.

    Helen

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    Helen,

    When do you take your HCL? During the meal? Right after? Does it matter?
    Doug

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    I am going to start taking an HCL capsule right after i eat a meal. If I dont feel any warmth in my stomach I will up it to 2 capsules and so forth and see what happens. I will keep everyone updated.
    Doug

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    Hi Doug,

    I generally take my HCl before the meal, but to be honest, its usually whenever I remember, this can be while eating or afterwards. Im sure theres an optimal time to take it, but Im quite forgetful and I reckon it all gets mixed up with the food anyway (dont take this as anywhere near a professional opinion lol)

    Last night I went off my omaprazole - would usually get heartburn if i even took it an hour late. I had very slight heartburn after eating, so took some apple cider vinegar, (man that stuff is disgusting, going to buy some tablets today), heartburn went away.

    I also bought some probiotic herbal stuff, wil give it a go and see if its any good.

    Did the burp test this morning and burped at 4mins45, so hmm. lowish stomach acid maybe? its quite close to 5 mins.

    Anyone know if the acv tablets are as useful as drinking the actual vinegar?

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    I also did the burp test this morning - NO BURPS at all. I'll get some Betaine HCL with Pepsin as I'm probably at an age where my stomach acid is low anyway, so it can't do any harm.

    Just have to make sure I don't take them too near drinking Kefir. The acid would undo the benefit of all that good bacteria but it woud be extremely helpful if it zapped any bad stuff at mealtimes.

    My transit time is about 48 hours which seems rather long perhaps this is another indication of low stomach acid?

    Thanks for the information Doug.

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    Default rosacea after taking Omeprazole

    Hello,

    This thread is very interesting for me !

    My rosacea started after having stomach problems. I had pain on my stomach and had a gastroscopy. Everything was ok, she said. She also took a sample to see if I had HP, but that wasn't the case. She described me Omeprazole and since then my rosacea got worser and worser.

    The link between the stomach and Rosacea would be a good subject for further scientific research.

    Thanks for posting this interesting thread and reactions !!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sally View Post

    I also did the burp test this morning - NO BURPS at all.

    Hi Sally,

    Did you check if the baking soda you used for the test was still fresh? If you aren't sure, buy a new box and do the test again. I tested the other day with baking soda I had bought last year and didn't cause any burps. Yesterday I bough a fresh box, tested this morning and burped within seconds.


    My transit time is about 48 hours which seems rather long perhaps this is another indication of low stomach acid?
    Maybe not. When I had low acid stomach my transit time was the same as now (24 hours). The difference, at least for me, was in the consistency of the stool: low acid = indigested food pieces and malformed stool.
    *
    I've treated seb derm successfully with raw honey and virgin coconut oil and have been symptom-free since June '09. Follow this ---> link <--- for details.

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