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Thread: Tea Tree Oil

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Suspended View Post
    4%? The only TTO I have seen is 100%. So in order to make a mixture that is 4% TTO, that would take some serious specificity with mixing.
    for essential oils of the consistency of ti tree oil, an easy Rough Guide for Dilutions is:
    adding one drop of essential oil to one teaspoon (5 ml) of carrier oil is (roughly) a 1% dilution.
    2 drops of essential oil per teaspoon of carrier = 2% ... and so on.
    so 4 drops of essential oil in a teaspoon of carrier oil = 4%.

    as bellableu's pointed out, you absolutely don't want to use dilutions higher than 5% on your skin -
    some people might not have problems using higher strengths at first,
    but they're just increasing the risk of developing a sensitization - and that can have very serious consequences.
    here's some good information on sensitization: http://www.naha.org/faq_safety.htm#14

    as Auburn and bellableu have noted, water is not a good carrier for essential oils. essential oils are lipophilic:
    the carrier needs to contain fat. otherwise you'll just have "hot spots" of 100% essential oil floating in water.
    the usual carriers are jojoba or vegetable oils. it doesn't have to be exotic or expensive stuff -
    whole milk can also be a carrier, if your skin likes it. coconut oil too, but let it liquefy before trying to blend in the essential oil.
    (nb: olive oil would NOT be a good choice for people with seb derm - the seb derm fungus likes olive oil.)

    hope that helps some ...
    Last edited by phlika29; 5th October 2010 at 12:15 PM. Reason: at request of author to acknowledge bellableu's comments

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by bellableu View Post
    I don't have the slightest idea about Accutane, having never used it, so I can't speak personally to whether it increases sensitivity, etc., but still: beware of trying so many things at once that you *do* increase sensitivity, redness, papules, pustules, etc. I gently suggest taking things slowly.

    Trying one new thing at a time might prove more useful in the long run - you'll have a better idea of what does what and what causes possible reactions. That's my standard advice to everyone (myself included - I've been known to try too many things at once, to my own chagrin).

    I think many others have tried variations of what you're doing, so hopefully you've read up on other people's experiences & can save yourself any unnecessary duplications of effort where it won't be helpful to you.

    Again, Good Luck & I hope you find an approach that works for you! Take care.
    Thanks! 'Preciate it
    -But I still haven't found what I'm looking for.

  3. #13
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    Why is applying tea tree oil directly from the bottle bad? I usually just dab a bit on my finger and spread it on my nose. Can this make things worse?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by brasileirao View Post
    Why is applying tea tree oil directly from the bottle bad? I usually just dab a bit on my finger and spread it on my nose. Can this make things worse?
    It might. All Essential Oils should be diluted before applying to skin; these are highly concentrated, volatile oils.

    Tea Tree Oil is meant to be diluted to under 5% strength (less is recommended, like 1 to 2%). Using it full strength is a good way to become sensitive to it. Some people never get sensitized to it, but once sensitized, you're sensitive to any contact with it pretty much forever. EO's are very effective diluted - actually MORE effective diluted.

    Some sources do suggest Tea Tree & Lavender oils can sometimes be used neat (undiluted). But that's controversial.
    Types I, II, IV - mild to moderate, depending ...

  5. #15
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    Thank you very much!

    I've quit using it for now, will give it a few months before I decide to go back. Hopefully hasn't been sensitized to it.

  6. #16
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    What is the preferred method of application once the TTO has been diluted?

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