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Thread: Tea Tree Oil

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    Default Tea Tree Oil

    Excerpt from wikipedia (I realize many of you probably disagree, but I find Wikipedia to be an excellent starting point for research):

    Tea tree oil has been recognized as a potent antiseptic in Australia anecdotally for many years, but has been scientifically investigated only relatively recently. Recent studies support a role for the topical application of tea tree oil in skin care and for the treatment of various diseases and conditions. Tea tree oil appears to be effective against bacteria, viruses, fungal infections, mites such as scabies, and lice such as head lice. A 2008 study of in vitro toxicity showed a tea tree oil preparation was more effective against head lice than permethrin, a popular pharmaceutical remedy.[9]
    Tea tree oil has activity against the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, including MRSA, and when used at a 10% concentration is comparable with mupirocin for application to the skin. At this concentration it has the added benefit of having never been shown to cause resistance; however, this can occur at lower percentages. Tea tree oil is less successful for application in the nose.[10] Also, there is clinical evidence that topical dermatological preparations containing tea tree oil may be more effective than conventional antibiotics in preventing transmission of CA-MRSA.[11]
    In the treatment of moderate common acne, topical application of 5% tea tree oil has shown an effect comparable to 5% benzoyl peroxide, albeit with slower onset of action.[12]
    Tea tree oil is a known antifungal agent, effective in vitro against multiple dermatophytes found on the skin.[13] In vivo, shampoo with 5% tea tree oil has been shown to be an effective treatment for dandruff due to its ability to treat Malassezia furfur, the most common cause of the condition.[14] Just a few drops of tea tree oil added to a small to medium sized bottle of baby shampoo works well to cure head lice as well.[15]
    The effectiveness of topical tea tree oil preparations for the treatment of the yeast infection Candidiasis is supported by its ability to kill Candida in vitro.[16]
    There is some very limited research that has shown that tea tree oil may have topical antiviral activity, especially against the herpes virus (cold sores), chicken pox, shingles blisters, etc.[17]
    One study has shown a 5% tea tree oil solution to be more effective than commercial medications against the scabies mite in an in vitro situation.[18]


    I was unlucky in finding any started threads specific to tea tree oil, so here's me asking whether anyone's had any experience with it? The medicinal uses seem very in sync with a lot of theoretical "causes" I've read for rosacea.
    -But I still haven't found what I'm looking for.

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    I have done the TTO treatment for ocular demodex. It seemed to work for about 3 weeks, so I bought TTO soap, cream, shampoo, everything I could find with TTO in it. I started adding it to my laundry, I put it in a spray bottle with water and squirted my bedding, carpets and dog beds. I also used it to squirt my face before applying moisturizer.

    At first, the one red dot I had cleared right up. Also, some weird white bump cleared up as well. One I had had for over a year. But my eye issues came roaring back and this time, the TTO treatment did not work, and I felt like my eyes were worse because getting the oil in your eyes is totally painful.

    I still use the spray bottle occasionally before moisturizing (although now I am trying the honey/oil protocol, so I have stopped until 6 weeks have passed.) But I do apply it directly to raised bumps on my legs that look like warts. And I still spray down the dog bedding and carpets and I add it to my laundry.

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    Sooo all in all, would you recommend it? I've read many success stories on TTO, but I am nervous it would break me out. I have a good amount of P&Ps already and I definitely don't need any more
    Well, trial and error right?
    -But I still haven't found what I'm looking for.

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    I think it is worth trying. But you have to be sure you dilute it in some sort of oil. DO NOT USE full strength on your face. Or at least dilute it with filtered or distilled water.

    If you want to buy some products, Desert Essence makes some really good TTO products.

    I am having better luck with the honey/oil treatment.

    Also, epsom salts or some bath salts are good for P & P's and redness. Just partially fill up your sink with warm water and pour in some salts. Splash your face with a washcloth. When finished, wash with raw honey and moisturize with coconut oil.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Suspended View Post

    Well, trial and error right?
    Pretty much so. If you decide to try it, don't use it neat from the bottle. Start with a 4% dilution. Also, since it's an oil, it needs to be diluted with another oil (remember, water and oil don't mix). Coconut, avocado and jojoba oils are good carrier oils.

    Cheers
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    I've treated seb derm successfully with raw honey and virgin coconut oil and have been symptom-free since June '09. Follow this ---> link <--- for details.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Auburn View Post
    Pretty much so. If you decide to try it, don't use it neat from the bottle. Start with a 4% dilution. Also, since it's an oil, it needs to be diluted with another oil (remember, water and oil don't mix). Coconut, avocado and jojoba oils are good carrier oils.

    Cheers
    4%? The only TTO I have seen is 100%. So in order to make a mixture that is 4% TTO, that would take some serious specificity with mixing.

    And I do agree with you on diluting an oil with another oil, but I don't have the money right now. What are your thoughts on applying a moisturizer and dabbing a little on with a cotton ball? Or vice versa? Or perhaps just mixing it in with a little moisturizer or water. I realize it's not ideal but I think the only potential side effect is that it would have less of a positive effect.

    I'm hoping you look back at this Auburn because something came to mind earlier when rereading your raw honey/coconut oil regimen:

    You say it's normal for the skin to get redder for the first two weeks and then start to clear up and get better. But at the same time, how can we differentiate between it having a positive effect on our skin versus it just being an irritant if both results make the skin more red. I hope I'm not sounding accusatory, I'm just interested in whether you have some advice.
    -But I still haven't found what I'm looking for.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Suspended View Post
    4%? The only TTO I have seen is 100%. So in order to make a mixture that is 4% TTO, that would take some serious specificity with mixing.

    And I do agree with you on diluting an oil with another oil, but I don't have the money right now. What are your thoughts on applying a moisturizer and dabbing a little on with a cotton ball? Or vice versa? Or perhaps just mixing it in with a little moisturizer or water. I realize it's not ideal but I think the only potential side effect is that it would have less of a positive effect.

    I'm hoping you look back at this Auburn because something came to mind earlier when rereading your raw honey/coconut oil regimen:

    You say it's normal for the skin to get redder for the first two weeks and then start to clear up and get better. But at the same time, how can we differentiate between it having a positive effect on our skin versus it just being an irritant if both results make the skin more red. I hope I'm not sounding accusatory, I'm just interested in whether you have some advice.
    Back to Tea Tree Oil - it's an essential oil and does need to be diluted in a carrier oil. EO's are usually recommended to be used at 0.5% to no more than 5% for facial skin use. It's a matter of a few drops to an ounce of carrier oil. It doesn't need to be super-specific. Diluting in water doesn't work when it's applied to skin - it doesn't actually dilute it at all, it's like applying it straight. Sometimes when people recommend using TTO straight on skin, they aren't aware of how sensitizing that can be. You can try adding a drop of TTO to an oil-based moisturizer to see how it works - but you'd need a fairly large dollop of cream to get the dilution down to under 5%. And, frankly, unless you KNOW your skin is okay with TTO (and not all skins are, mine isn't), you want to start with the smallest possible amount just to minimize reactions.

    I'm sorry if I missed this elsewhere, but what are you trying to treat with the TTO? It's antimicrobial/antifungal, but I thought you were dealing with post-Accutane redness?

    Try to start conservatively. Good Luck.
    Types I, II, IV - mild to moderate, depending ...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Suspended View Post

    but I don't have the money right now.
    Well, maybe you should wait until you can buy the carrier oil.


    I'm just interested in whether you have some advice.
    I do: read the whole FAQ.

    Let's stay on topic.
    *
    I've treated seb derm successfully with raw honey and virgin coconut oil and have been symptom-free since June '09. Follow this ---> link <--- for details.

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    To Auburn,
    Great I'll look at the FAQ. Thanks I'm sure you get quite a few questions that are already addressed in your post. Thanks for your patience


    Bellableu,

    First off, I appreciate the reply. In reply to your question about treating post-accutane redness, yes, that is what I'm trying to do. I think it's completely untrue for someone (I'm definitely not implying that someone is you) to claim that accutane-induced rosacea is due to a sensitivity to the skin and reduction of the epidermal layer. If that was the case, we could simply treat it with moisturizers and supplements that rebuild that barrier. I have yet to find out what the true underlying cause is for people with accutane-induced rosacea, but I believe it is definitely related to something going on internal. Specifically, the intestines, the digestive system, or something similar. The documented side effects of accutane are sometimes directly correlated with some of those organs. I've read a few trending posts about accutane induced rosacea being treated with anti-malarial antibiotics, and if I remember correctly, those antibiotics are anti-fungal as well.

    So though it might not work in the slightest, I am willing to try an anti-candida diet, anti-candida supplements, and an anti-fungal topical.

    On a side note, metrogel (which I'm sure you've heard of or perhaps even used) and other topical rosacea treatments are used to eradicate Helicobacter Pylori, which is believed to play some part in not only rosacea, but in candida.

    Much of this is speculation, but heck, worth a try right?
    -But I still haven't found what I'm looking for.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Suspended View Post
    To Auburn,
    Great I'll look at the FAQ. Thanks I'm sure you get quite a few questions that are already addressed in your post. Thanks for your patience


    Bellableu,

    First off, I appreciate the reply. In reply to your question about treating post-accutane redness, yes, that is what I'm trying to do. I think it's completely untrue for someone (I'm definitely not implying that someone is you) to claim that accutane-induced rosacea is due to a sensitivity to the skin and reduction of the epidermal layer. If that was the case, we could simply treat it with moisturizers and supplements that rebuild that barrier. I have yet to find out what the true underlying cause is for people with accutane-induced rosacea, but I believe it is definitely related to something going on internal. Specifically, the intestines, the digestive system, or something similar. The documented side effects of accutane are sometimes directly correlated with some of those organs. I've read a few trending posts about accutane induced rosacea being treated with anti-malarial antibiotics, and if I remember correctly, those antibiotics are anti-fungal as well.

    So though it might not work in the slightest, I am willing to try an anti-candida diet, anti-candida supplements, and an anti-fungal topical.

    On a side note, metrogel (which I'm sure you've heard of or perhaps even used) and other topical rosacea treatments are used to eradicate Helicobacter Pylori, which is believed to play some part in not only rosacea, but in candida.

    Much of this is speculation, but heck, worth a try right?
    I don't have the slightest idea about Accutane, having never used it, so I can't speak personally to whether it increases sensitivity, etc., but still: beware of trying so many things at once that you *do* increase sensitivity, redness, papules, pustules, etc. I gently suggest taking things slowly.

    Trying one new thing at a time might prove more useful in the long run - you'll have a better idea of what does what and what causes possible reactions. That's my standard advice to everyone (myself included - I've been known to try too many things at once, to my own chagrin).

    I think many others have tried variations of what you're doing, so hopefully you've read up on other people's experiences & can save yourself any unnecessary duplications of effort where it won't be helpful to you.

    Again, Good Luck & I hope you find an approach that works for you! Take care.
    Types I, II, IV - mild to moderate, depending ...

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