Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 62

Thread: computer screen flushing

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    108

    Default computer screen flushing

    i have one of those backlight led monitors....anyone notice they flush while looking at it for long time?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,622
    Country: United States

    Default

    I DO! "Artificial Lights" are my biggest trigger I believe. I wish someone on this forum who has found a treatment for people like us would come forward!!
    Doug

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    108

    Default

    maybe just wear zinc oxide sunscreen while looking at them?

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,622
    Country: United States

    Default

    UV radiation from lighting, copiers, computer monitors etc.
    Does shopping make you ill? It may be from the fluorescent lighting in the store - those long rectangular boxes with tube lights inside them. People with lupus are most known for being sensitive to indoor lighting like fluorescent or other lighting in large warehouse type stores, but other people with sun sensitivity (photosensitivity) can also be sensitive to UV rays from lighting. In particular, people with Xeroderma Pigmentosum must totally avoid all forms of ultraviolet light. With lupus, UV can trigger flares, rashes, itching, low grade fevers and cause muscle and joint pain. Other folks describe the effects of UV lighting as giving them a "whoozy" feeling and makes them feel nauseous or fatigued. A two hour shopping spree in Walmart is equivalent to a full hour in the sun. You don't get sunburned but you do get the full hour of UV rays. [Sewell] Hospitals and clinics also use very bright fluorescent lighting. Other sources of UV radiation is from copiers, computer screens, welding, and various kinds of lighting.

    Protecting yourself from indoor UV radiation
    Protect yourself from indoor UV radiation by using the same techniques as you would for the sun outside: sunscreen, hat, sunglasses, gloves. etc. See the Sunscreen web page for more on sunscreens. (For example, my doctor's office has really bright fluorescent lights that make me feel sick. Now that I wear my hat and sunglasses and sunscreen inside the clinic, I no longer feel sick inside the clinic. ) You can also remove sources of UV radiation such as fluorescent lighting and replacing them with incandescent bulbs or adding UV shields to existing lighting. If you work in a place with UV lighting that you can't avoid, consider wearing sunscreens with high UVB and UVA protection as well as light colored sunglasses that block out UV rays.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Computer Monitors (CRT)
    Computer screens also give off small amounts of UV radiation. Most people are not affected by it, but people with lupus or other photo sensitivities should take precautions. Especially if you are in front of the screen for long periods of time (more than an hour at a time, for days in a row).

    The best thing you can purchase to help eliminate the problem is a monitor anti-glare screen that fits over the monitor itself. It knocks down the glare as well as blocks the UV rays. 3M company makes several different kinds. [Sewell]

    Google search for "computer radiation filter"
    3M Standard Glass Monitor Filter fits 16-19 CRT
    http://www.pegasusassociates.com/pro.../UVfilter.html
    http://www.ergoindemand.com/glarefilters2.htm

    Flat Panel Screens
    Newer thin or flat panel computer monitors and all laptop/notebook computer screens are Liquid Crystal type displays (LCDs). Televisions are now available with screens using both LCD and plasma technology. Neither should be confused with the similar-sounding term: "flat screen" which almost always are CRTs (see above) that have a flat screen face. The XP Society attempted to measure UV that might be radiated from LCD screens. They were unable to detect any UVA or UVB using meters capable of measuring as low as 1 microwatt per square centimeter in the UVA and UVB spectrum. [XP UV notes]
    Doug

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,622
    Country: United States

    Default

    In a small preliminary trial, supplementation with fish oil (10 grams per day for three months) reduced photosensitivity in 90% of people suffering from polymorphous light eruptions.
    Doug

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    108

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mrsmoof View Post
    UV radiation from lighting, copiers, computer monitors etc.
    Does shopping make you ill? It may be from the fluorescent lighting in the store - those long rectangular boxes with tube lights inside them. People with lupus are most known for being sensitive to indoor lighting like fluorescent or other lighting in large warehouse type stores, but other people with sun sensitivity (photosensitivity) can also be sensitive to UV rays from lighting. In particular, people with Xeroderma Pigmentosum must totally avoid all forms of ultraviolet light. With lupus, UV can trigger flares, rashes, itching, low grade fevers and cause muscle and joint pain. Other folks describe the effects of UV lighting as giving them a "whoozy" feeling and makes them feel nauseous or fatigued. A two hour shopping spree in Walmart is equivalent to a full hour in the sun. You don't get sunburned but you do get the full hour of UV rays. [Sewell] Hospitals and clinics also use very bright fluorescent lighting. Other sources of UV radiation is from copiers, computer screens, welding, and various kinds of lighting.

    Protecting yourself from indoor UV radiation
    Protect yourself from indoor UV radiation by using the same techniques as you would for the sun outside: sunscreen, hat, sunglasses, gloves. etc. See the Sunscreen web page for more on sunscreens. (For example, my doctor's office has really bright fluorescent lights that make me feel sick. Now that I wear my hat and sunglasses and sunscreen inside the clinic, I no longer feel sick inside the clinic. ) You can also remove sources of UV radiation such as fluorescent lighting and replacing them with incandescent bulbs or adding UV shields to existing lighting. If you work in a place with UV lighting that you can't avoid, consider wearing sunscreens with high UVB and UVA protection as well as light colored sunglasses that block out UV rays.


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Computer Monitors (CRT)
    Computer screens also give off small amounts of UV radiation. Most people are not affected by it, but people with lupus or other photo sensitivities should take precautions. Especially if you are in front of the screen for long periods of time (more than an hour at a time, for days in a row).

    The best thing you can purchase to help eliminate the problem is a monitor anti-glare screen that fits over the monitor itself. It knocks down the glare as well as blocks the UV rays. 3M company makes several different kinds. [Sewell]

    Google search for "computer radiation filter"
    3M Standard Glass Monitor Filter fits 16-19 CRT
    http://www.pegasusassociates.com/pro.../UVfilter.html
    http://www.ergoindemand.com/glarefilters2.htm

    Flat Panel Screens
    Newer thin or flat panel computer monitors and all laptop/notebook computer screens are Liquid Crystal type displays (LCDs). Televisions are now available with screens using both LCD and plasma technology. Neither should be confused with the similar-sounding term: "flat screen" which almost always are CRTs (see above) that have a flat screen face. The XP Society attempted to measure UV that might be radiated from LCD screens. They were unable to detect any UVA or UVB using meters capable of measuring as low as 1 microwatt per square centimeter in the UVA and UVB spectrum. [XP UV notes]
    great info thanx

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    57

    Default

    I heard that an instant way to protect yourself from monitor radiation is to turn the brightness setting right down.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,622
    Country: United States

    Default

    UKDave - what should it be set at? i have mine at 25
    Doug

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Posts
    57

    Default

    I don't know of a specific setting, although I have mine down really quite low, obviously without making things difficult to read, causing eye strain, or feeling that you need to get closer to the screen. I'm not sure if anything has been proven about this, but quite a few sites seem to recommend it.

    Point 4 of this site, for example:
    http://healthmad.com/health/nine-eff...ter-radiation/

  10. #10
    Junior Member Suzy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by UKDave View Post
    I heard that an instant way to protect yourself from monitor radiation is to turn the brightness setting right down.
    WOW!! I just checked mine and it was on max so I have reset it to 50%
    I have a home office so anything that helps how ever small is a plus some days I am online 9-10 hours (yes I do take breaks)

Similar Threads

  1. Coppertone sun screen
    By Lynn Three in forum Topical and oral products (non-prescription)
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 29th June 2010, 02:47 PM
  2. need help finding sun screen company?
    By Lynn Three in forum Topical and oral products (non-prescription)
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 12th January 2009, 01:08 AM
  3. Screen names
    By spuggylegs in forum Off-topic discussion
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 2nd March 2008, 01:54 AM
  4. moisturizer, Sun Screen cause more redness for you?
    By Lamar in forum Topical and oral products (non-prescription)
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 17th December 2007, 04:22 PM
  5. Rosacea Development and the Computer Screen
    By historybook in forum General rosacea questions
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 6th July 2007, 05:00 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •