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Thread: Rosacea and other health issues...

  1. #1
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    Default Rosacea and other health issues...

    Hello ALL

    Was just wondering what other health issues do you have along with your rosacea? Sorry if this question has been asked before...just got some time off work and trying to figure out some things for myself (blame my day job as it requires constant problem solving!!!) ...

    I have IBD (ulcerative colitis which is inflammation of the bowel) but this hasnt been an issue for the last few years - ive actually gone from having an imflammed bowel to face! I go through periods of tiredness too (not currently) for the last year although Im not 100% this could be the result of an immunosupressant i take from time to time. Last year strangely enough (I get my blood count monitored quite a lot) i started exp low wbc (neutrophills) which would then randomly get back to normal (at normal levels the last time i checked too - last month). The doc thought this was rather strange but had seen this in several of his patients last year where there was no obvious reason - he just believed it could have been caused by a possible virus...although I had no other symptoms to indicate I did have a virus...Strangely enough this got me thinking since my wbc have gone back to the normal range (Im not 100%) but my redness in the cheeks have also increased - coincidence or not???

    How about the rest of you???...Do you think rosacea is a disease by itself or a symptom of something else? If it is a symptom of something else (which I believe) then why do the docs not investigate further - they just seem to be handing out meds???...I had a letter from the derma to my gp where i was cc'd who described my health as generally well - well he didnt ask me any questions to come to this conclusion...hmm...

    Look forward to reading your responses!

  2. #2
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    I've read that UC has been linked to mycobacterium avium complex infection.
    I think that immune suppressants are not solving the underlying cause, which is an under active immune system, producing low affinity antibodies due to adrenal dysfunction, rather than an over active one, as the mainstream medicine said.
    And you have to adress the bacterial origin by building the flora back, as the immune system. Yucca root, licorice root are both GREAT anti inflammatories and will really help you, and they will also feed the flora and build the adrenals, which will improve the immune response by producing high affinity antibodies.

    By the way I have IBS and leaky gut syndrome, and lot of seb derm/rosacea sufferers have GI probs.

    Here's an article about the role of probiotics and the link to IBD and even skin inflammations :

    Inflamed in the Membranes : Digestive Tract and Skin

    Relative to its digestive action (catalyzing dietary proteins), bromelain may affect leukocyte migration and cytokine production in the GI tract;1 in fact, administration of the enzyme in ulcerative colitis (UC) patients led to deceased colonic inflammation. Investigating bromelain's mechanism of action in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), Duke University Medical Center scientists discovered this collection of proteases from pineapple decreases neutrophil migration to the inflammation site and supports the removal of chemokine receptors.2



    Inflammation is a chief factor in numerous gastrointestinal (GI) disorders and diseases, including IBDs such as UC and Crohn's disease. As harmful bacteria can be a trigger of inflammation in the body, it makes sense beneficial bacteria competing with those bad microbes in the gut would help manage IBDs.



    Probiotics, however, do more than just compete, as they can inhibit the expression of inflammatory cytokines in the gut.3 Individually, Lactobacillus farciminis can help maintain intestinal integrity and modulate inflammatory response in colitis;4 L. paracasei can help modulate mucosal inflammation in UC by reducing colonic cytokines;5 and Lactobacillus GG can inhibit the expression of immune and inflammation genes, including TGF-beta, TNF-alpha, cytokines, NOS and ICAM, in the small bowel mucosa of IBD patients.6

    Combinations of probiotics have also proven beneficial to IBD intervention. A trial conducted at Rikshospitalet University Hospital, Oslo, Norway, found lactobacilli and bifido administration decreased clinical symptoms and endoscopic inflammation in UC patients.7 And Swiss researchers reported a probiotic cocktail modulated cytokine balance, including TNFa-to-IL-10 ratio, in the duodenum of an animal model of chronic enteropathy.8

    Reflecting the synergism of probiotics and prebiotics, A University of Dundee, Scotland, study showed bifido probiotic combined with the prebiotic inulin-oligiofructose (as Raftilose® Synergy 1 from Orafti) reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and regenerated epithelial tissue in patients with active UC.9

    The prebiotic fructo-oligiosaccharide (FOS) administered in an animal model of UC inhibited inflammation, resulting in reduced disease activity and damage in the distal colon.10 More recently, a 2008 Hakkaido University, Japan, animal study concluded consumption of FOS decreased hypersensitivity in antigen-specific skin inflammation by improving microbiotic composition, especially bifido bacteria count; symptomatically, skin swelling decreased after FOS intervention.11

    FOS isn't the only natural ingredient to manage inflammation in both GI and skin barriers. In the GI, Aloe vera has inhibited ROS production and reduced inflammatory cytokines PGE2 and IL-8, rendering it useful in IBD care.12 Subsequent research has added to this mechanism, as Aloe vera protected against oxidative damage by decreasing TNFa, IL-1 and IL-6 while increasing antioxidant super oxide dismutase (SOD) in a salmonella-mediated inflammatory model.13 Similarly, Aloe barbadensissuppressed TNFa and IL-1b from activated leukocytes.14

    In the skin, Aloe vera has been found to promote wound healing and curtail inflammatory activities in second-degree burns.15 Researchers have suggested aloe can inhibit the LOX pathway to inflammation in situations of burns and skin ulcers.16

    An eye-protecting compound, the carotenoid lutein, has expanded its protective benefits to the skin, especially problems related to sun exposure and aging. According to a Cornell University animal study, lutein modulated the skin’s response to ultra-violet B (UVB) radiation-induced inflammation and immunosupression.17 Similarly, researchers from Harvard Medical School found lutein and zeaxanthin diminished the negative effects of UVB radiation by reducing acute inflammatory response.18
    And just for fun, here you will find an interesting story about a guy (hosting the best online site on kefir by the way) who cured his UC by using kefir grains in rectal injections (yes yes) : http://users.sa.chariot.net.au/~dna/IBD/index.htm
    Last edited by MasK; 22nd April 2010 at 01:06 PM.

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    Where do you buy licorice root in the US?
    Doug

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    I believe the digestive system plays some role in Rosacea as 70% of our immune systems are part of the digestive system. So a bad digestive system means a weakened immuned system which leads to disease, acne, etc... I have read when women start menoupause their digestive system and immune system are not good. And supposedly a lot of women get Rosacea during this time. So that tells me something is going on with the digestive system.
    Doug

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    Thanks Mask for posting the link and article!

    Ill be honest I had to look up what Yucca root was - but its cassava (or mogo) right? If so, I do eat that quite often - boiled and fried! Sometimes marinated...does that count??? Really tasty and didnt know it was a great anti infammatory - great excuse to eat more of it now!

    What I also find interesting is that certain diseases affect certain ethnic groups more than others too. Rosacea with caucasians or fair skinned people, lupus usu. in non caucasians, IBD in the western world although increasing in other places etc...

    For those with IBS or other GI issues have you ever tried elimination diets or diets like Raw food or SCD? They may help to reduce your symptoms...

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    mrsmoof thanks for your response too. I have a close good friend who has similar beliefs and knows about all sorts to do with natural health - he is currently in the states but should be back next week where I will seek him out for his great advice and tell him about my rosacea dramas of the last few weeks! I trust him with my health more than the dermas!!!

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    Default Interesting Article...

    ROSACEA is a relatively common skin disorder that mainly afflicts adults between the ages of thirty and fifty--women nearly three times as often as men. It usually occurs over the cheeks and nose and looks like a sunburn. Some people will also get pimples that resemble acne. Rosacea can wax and wane; certain foods or alcohol or exposure to the sun can increase the problem.

    Unfortunately, no one is certain precisely what causes rosacea. Studies have connected it with everything from menopause to alcoholism, but it seems that the most convincing evidence links it to either food allergies and/or an imbalance of the digestive system.

    The traditional treatment is the antibiotic tetracycline. It's unclear precisely how it acts to reduce rosacea, but in many cases it is of some help; in some other cases it seems to have little effect. My own approach is an effort to remedy the two factors most closely connected with the development of rosacea and to make some modifications in the diet. For many patients, these measures will completely clear up their symptoms.

    If you know that you have allergies now or have had them as a child, it could be that they are causing your rosacea. Many people find that once they eliminate certain foods, their rosacea disappears. An allergy to yeast is the most common allergenic cause and eliminating yeast from the diet can help such cases.

    In addition, you should also avoid foods that cause blood vessels to dilate, including coffee, alcohol, spicy foods, and any other foods that cause a flush.

    There is a strong link between a certain digestive imbalance called hypochlorhydria--reduced gastric acid output--and rosacea. Hypochlorhydria sometimes occurs as a the result of stress, worry, or depression, but some people seem to have a natural reduction in gastric juices, particularly as they get older. It's believed that this reduction in digestive juices may somehow allow more toxic substances into the system and thereby contribute to rosacea. Many of these people also suffer from constipation and brittle fingernails and hair.

    The solution to hypochlorhydria is hydrochloric acid capsules, but you shouldn't take them before you've had a gastric analysis done by your doctor. If you take the capsules without having been analyzed, you run the risk of developing an ulcer. Be sure not to take the capsules with aspirin or certain other drugs.

    For unknown reasons, taking acidophilus along with hydrochloric acid tablets seems to increase the effectiveness.

    One supplement that seems to help is vitamin B12, perhaps because people with a digestive problem also have trouble absorbing vitamins.

    NATURAL PRESCRIPTION FOR ROSACEA

    Determine if you suffer from food allergies. If yeast Is causing the problem, find out if it is candidiasis. Eliminate any problematic foods from your diet.
    If a gastric analysis determines that you are suffering from hypochlorhydria, take hydrochloric acid tablets under your doctor's supervision. (If you are taking hydrochloric acid tablets, take one acidophilus tablet three times daily.)
    Avoid foods that cause blood vessels to dilate, including coffee, alcohol, spicy foods, and any other foods that cause a flush.
    IN ADDITION TO YOUR DAILY SUPPLEMENTS, TAKE:

    B12: 1,000 mcg. dissolved under your tongue.
    Doug

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    Default The Party "Cure"

    Quote Originally Posted by noddy View Post
    Hello ALL

    Was just wondering what other health issues do you have along with your rosacea? Sorry if this question has been asked before...just got some time off work and trying to figure out some things for myself (blame my day job as it requires constant problem solving!!!) ...

    I have IBD (ulcerative colitis which is inflammation of the bowel) but this hasnt been an issue for the last few years - ive actually gone from having an imflammed bowel to face! I go through periods of tiredness too (not currently) for the last year although Im not 100% this could be the result of an immunosupressant i take from time to time. Last year strangely enough (I get my blood count monitored quite a lot) i started exp low wbc (neutrophills) which would then randomly get back to normal (at normal levels the last time i checked too - last month). The doc thought this was rather strange but had seen this in several of his patients last year where there was no obvious reason - he just believed it could have been caused by a possible virus...although I had no other symptoms to indicate I did have a virus...Strangely enough this got me thinking since my wbc have gone back to the normal range (Im not 100%) but my redness in the cheeks have also increased - coincidence or not???

    How about the rest of you???...Do you think rosacea is a disease by itself or a symptom of something else? If it is a symptom of something else (which I believe) then why do the docs not investigate further - they just seem to be handing out meds???...I had a letter from the derma to my gp where i was cc'd who described my health as generally well - well he didnt ask me any questions to come to this conclusion...hmm...

    Look forward to reading your responses!
    I suffer from gut issues and asthma. I had been feeling generally just run down for a month with both ear and sinus infections. I begged for Vitamin B shot, but to no avail. As so many others have posted, i took a short vacay and did all the wrong things: flying, eating deep dish pizza, cosmopolitans, chocolate cake, wine ad infinitum and was never better rosacea-wise in addition to having a lot of fun at late nite jazz/ blues club. Unfortunately the party ended and I am now once again blushing. Trying to tell myself red is the new black. I am seriously beginning to think we red faces should just have one big continued party and see how we fare!
    Last edited by KRC; 22nd September 2014 at 05:00 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KRC View Post
    I suffer from gut issues and asthma. I had been feeling generally just run down for a month with both ear and sinus infections. I begged for Vitamin B shot, but to no avail. As so many others have posted, i took a short vacay and did all the wrong things: flying, eating deep dish pizza, cosmopolitans, chocolate cake, wine ad infinitum and was never better rosacea-wise in addition to having a lot of fun at late nite jazz/ blues club. Unfortunately the party ended and I am now once again blushing. Trying to tell myself red is the new black. I am seriously beginning to think we red faces should just have one big continued party and see how we fare!

    I have exercise-induced asthma. When I stopped eating gluten and dairy, my lungs felt much clearer within a couple of days. It was actually striking--I've had it since I was 13 and always needed an inhaler to exercise. Obviously, I don't know what's wrong with you, but if you have multiple co-existing disorders that are characterized by inflammation, you might want to try altering your diet and see where it gets you. You might be in for a pleasant surprise.

    Best,

    David
    35 year-old male
    Erythmatotelangiectatic rosacea & Ocular
    20 + laser treatments.
    Toleraine Soothing Light Facial Fluid for moisturizer. I don't use a special cleanser. Clonidine daily; klonopin sometimes.
    BEST and CURRENT TREATMENT I use: Low-Level Red Light Therapy LED array.
    Please feel free to PM me with your low-level red light therapy (LLRLT) questions. I'm happy to help if I can.

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