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Thread: My Vitamin D3 Story

  1. #1
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    Default My Vitamin D3 Story

    I'm kinda in the opposite boat on most with VD3 (but, am open minded) - I'm almost positive I didn't have rosacea at all before starting a sudden regimen of 5k a day that within weeks, escalated to 10k a day in light of the recent swine flu scare of late last year.

    I first noticed my nose oozing clear liquid.. and thought "what the heck.. that's weird" Then I started breaking out around my nose and between the eyes.. It finally occurred to me that the VD3 was having some sort of reaction on my skin..

    I stopped VD3 cold turkey.. and my face seem to clear for a bit. Then a few weeks later had a bunch of stress and whamo! face explodes in all out redness, noose resumed it's oozing and the whole nine yards..

    Now after 2 months of this insanity I'm actually considering taking VD3 again to try to fix the problem I feel it started in the first place. Am I crazy?

    3 days in my face is already more red and hotter.. is this vitamin D3 really worth all this headache?

    Like I know sunshine is good for us.. But, does that really mean synthetic man-made sunshine pills are equally good for us? You know cause after reading iDan's stuff on here he explains it can take years for synthetic D3 to help you.. and that you have to ease up the dose. But, even when easing you still suffer a worsening of symptoms.. I know I've been sunburned my fair share in this life and never has it caused me rosacea.. And think about it, humans wouldn't be able to successfully ease up their naturally sunshine exposure right? So why is it like that with the pills? Something isn't right with the pills.

    I don't think our body's quite know how to handle the synthetic vitamin D. At very least it throws off some kinda natural balance.. I think we are meant to be in the sun.. man made stuff is always going to be flawed in some way shape or form.

    -O
    Last edited by orangedrone; 8th April 2010 at 11:15 PM.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Auburn's Avatar
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    Hi Orangedrone,


    I think we are meant to be in the sun.. man made stuff is always going to be flawed in some way shape or form.
    That's right.

    My story:

    Taking pills is something I really dislike and when it comes to supplements and vitamins, well, I'm not a big fan of those either.

    I found iDan's thread very interesting; been doing a lot of reading on vit D, too.

    Anyway, last year, and because of that thread, I asked my doctor to include vit D in my blood work. My numbers were low, as expected (24). This was in late June, I think. By then my seb derm was completely under control and my diffuse pinkness very mild.

    I started taking 1000 IU of Vit D3, in pill form, daily. Within 48 hours my face went from slightly pink to almost red, my skin felt rather warm all day and I was flushing a lot.

    On the third day I developed insomnia, nocturnia (one night I had to get up six times!), a lot of muscular pain and headaches.

    On the seventh day I threw the pills away. My face went back to normal (for me) in a couple of days. The muscular pain took a bit longer to subside.

    Did some more reading on the subject and concluded that, for me, the best option was the natural way so I began exposing 80% of my skin to the midday sun daily for 20 minutes. The body is supposed to make something like 20000 IU of the best form of vitamin D from sun exposure in less than it takes for the skin to burn.

    Well, I did this from early July all the way to late October. Developed a very mild tan and never, not even once, did I have a side effect from the massive amounts of vit D my body was making naturally.

    My husband's vit D numbers are very low, he got his results last week, so we went to the health food shop to get some good quality vit D and found a few brands that come in liquid form. He's been taking it since last Saturday with few side effects so I thought I'd try it too. Well, ten drops = 1000 IU and in two days I started experiencing exactly the same side effects as with the pills last year.

    I don't care if the stuff comes from sheep's lanolin. Whatever. Vitamin D from the sun does not give me any side effects. The synthetic stuff does. Period.

    I haven't yet been to the doc's for my annual this year and haven't had any sun exposure in the past six months so I don't know what my numbers are but in just a few weeks I will start again with the daily midday sun exposure for 20 minutes and I'll probably get a vitamin D lamp, most likely from Sperti, for the winter.

    Last edited by Auburn; 9th April 2010 at 01:45 AM.
    *
    I've treated seb derm successfully with raw honey and virgin coconut oil and have been symptom-free since June '09. Follow this ---> link <--- for details.

  3. #3
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    Hey orange

    I think vitamin D is all about balance when it comes to rosacea. At least in my case, during the winter if I don't take a vitamin D pill for a while it is very noticeable for my skin. However if I take too much for a few days it causes it to redden a bit. It's all about balance, usually a day on day off of the supplement works out great for me.

    Theres simply too many possibilities to really nail down any explanation at the time but I remember reading something along the lines of vitamin D catalyzing some immune protein in the skin; that could possibly be one way to explain how too much vitamin D might cause your body to have a over-inflammatory response on your face.

    Just test a bit and look in the mirror.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Auburn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by daftpunk View Post

    that could possibly be one way to explain how too much vitamin D might cause your body to have a over-inflammatory response on your face.
    Then why the 20000 or so IU one can get from the sun in a half hour don't cause such response?
    *
    I've treated seb derm successfully with raw honey and virgin coconut oil and have been symptom-free since June '09. Follow this ---> link <--- for details.

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    Yeah, I don't doubt some are having success with it.. But, to me.. this "vitamin", "steroid", "hormone" whatever it really is.. gave me a permanent skin disease.. so you can imagine why I would kinda frown upon it

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    Quote Originally Posted by Auburn View Post
    Then why the 20000 or so IU one can get from the sun in a half hour don't cause such response?
    Don't know but in the supplements, D3 has to be converted in the kidneys to active vitamin D, if I'm right.
    But with the sun I think cholesterol is being converted to vit D by the liver through the skin, so it is not likely to be the same.
    Just and educated guess.
    To be able to convert D3 to active form you need properly working liver and kidneys.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Auburn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by orangedrone View Post

    this "vitamin", "steroid", "hormone" whatever it really is.. gave me a permanent skin disease..
    Can synthetic vit D3 cause rosacea?

    In your previous post you said that you started taking 5K and then 10K daily and that you are almost positive you didn't have rosacea before you started supplementing with D3 but that you developed symptoms while taking it. Symptoms subsided when you quit cold turkey only to return during a very stressful period.

    It is quite possible that your initial symptoms were triggered by something else (e.g., hormone fluctuation, anxiety, stress).

    Also, do you know for sure that what you have is rosacea?
    *
    I've treated seb derm successfully with raw honey and virgin coconut oil and have been symptom-free since June '09. Follow this ---> link <--- for details.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Auburn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Auburn View Post

    Then why the 20000 or so IU one can get from the sun in a half hour don't cause such response?
    Quote Originally Posted by MasK View Post

    Don't know but in the supplements, D3 has to be converted in the kidneys to active vitamin D, if I'm right.
    But with the sun I think cholesterol is being converted to vit D by the liver through the skin, so it is not likely to be the same.
    Just and educated guess.
    To be able to convert D3 to active form you need properly working liver and kidneys.
    In my case, both seem to work fine.

    Nevertheless, there has to be a difference, other than that.

    For most people is just not possible/practical to expose most of their skin to the midday sun daily for 20 minutes. I wonder what would happen if that were not the case. Would rosacea and seb derm be as common if people could safely get enough vit D from the sun?
    *
    I've treated seb derm successfully with raw honey and virgin coconut oil and have been symptom-free since June '09. Follow this ---> link <--- for details.

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    Senior Member Michael_V's Avatar
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    Vitamin D3 (or cholecalciferol) is generated in the skin when sun light is absorbed by the precursor molecule 7-dehydrocholesterol. There are also dietary sources of vitamin D, including egg yolk, fish oil and some plants. The plant form of activated vitamin D is called vitamin D2 (or ergosterol).

    Neither vitamin D3 nor D2 is hormonally active until it is metabolized first in the liver (where a 25 hydroxyl group is added) and then in the kidneys (where a 1 hydroxyl group is added) to 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol.

    The activated versions of both vitamin D3 and D3 are thought to be biologically equivalent; however, the body is a complicated place, and the solar activation of these provitamins (D3 and D2) is known to produce a number of photoisomers, meaning forms that have the same chemical formula but slightly different structures and therefore activities.

    This becomes more complex when we look at the area of greatest interest to us as rosaceans: the antiproliferative activity of vitamin D against keratinocytes. So far as I know, it isn't entirely clear which metabolite(s) or intermediate(s) or photoisomer(s) in the chain (or even combinations of them!) are active against the vitamin D receptors.

    So ...

    I personally trust nature and our evolutionary history. Paleolithic man surely got all the active vitamin D he needed from his many hours foraging or hunting in the sun each day with only modest contributions from dietary sources.

    In going through the nine hundred and thirty-one (and counting) posts to one high dose vitamin D thread, it seems to me that Dan has many disciples but few actual successes. Even Mistica, who has been one of his main evangelists, recently wavered in her faith and openly expressed her doubts. Frankly, if this approach were truly effective, I would think we should see far more remissions by now.

  10. #10
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    Some thoughts for the original poster...

    As far as we know, the reactions that happen with D3 indicate that it's doing what you want it to do, which is help your body fight off infection. Some people are more sensitive to it than others, or maybe have more infection to fight, and so have a worse reaction (me included). Like I mentioned in another post, it seems to be a trend that the people who have the worst reaction to it end up eventually getting the most benefit. In my experience, it also takes longer to get over the reactions at higher doses, even if you ramp up very slowly. I think there haven't been many success stories because 1) it takes so long, 2) the reactions are discouraging, and 3) you have to be doing everything else right. If you're using something that is preventing you from getting better, the D3 won't help. I'm doing extremely well, but I still can't go out and eat double cheeseburgers every day, or use certain topicals.

    I have a 2-year-old who started child care for the first time in January. The first month was a non-stop nightmare of illness for all of us. After that, about every 1-2 weeks we would all get another cold. I started taking 1,000 IU in February, and still got sick.

    In the 1.5 months since I upped the dose to 2,000 and then 3,000 IU, I have not had a cold, but for a while I did wake up periodically with dark green phlegm and minor cold symptoms. These went away by mid-morning. I'm guessing my body was effectively fighting it off. At this point, I have not had any cold symptoms at all for a couple weeks. My wife and son are both still sick, but unfortunately I can't convince her to up her dose, as there is an ignorant doctor involved telling her to take ZERO. She is compromising at 1,000 and it's apparently not enough.

    Skin can take a very long time to recover. I still have faint damage/redness on my nose and feet from a sunburn that occurred almost three years ago. However, I believe that even cases of severe damage will correct themselves eventually (obviously not some damage, such as scarring from burns), as long as you are healthy and there is nothing else preventing it, such as harsh topicals or internal triggers. I think what happened in your case, and in many others, is that you took too much too fast, did some damage, and now just have to wait for recovery. Those who take a bunch, experience a bad reaction, then get better after stopping, obviously are going to translate that as "D3 is bad for me."

    If you want the cold and flu-fighting effects, I don't think you need 5,000 IU or more. Besides my own experience, I read at least one other anecdotal observation of an entire hospital ward resisting a flu outbreak (with exposure to other, infected wards) at only 2,000 IU/day.

    1,000mg Solgar MSM
    25mg diphenhydramine
    Rosacea Care moisturizer, tinted ZincO
    I avoid multi-vitamins and most other high-dose vitamins and supplements, oil-based supplements (like omega 3/6, A, and E), nitrite preservatives, sugar, fruit, milk, exercising in a warm room

    Less is more!

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